BREXIT positives and negatives

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Blimey! DM 314 a month! Generational issue! DM! German insurance or international?

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Last off topic post - it was German and I was a young lady.

 

When we married, I just had my insurance guy roll that monthly payment into a life insurance which I thoroughly enjoyed when I turned 60. Still reaping the benefits.

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You are still young, Fraufruit❤️.

And your insurance guy was incredibly smart- turning health insurance into a life insurance! I have never achieved that in 30 years or so!😂

And I doubt I ever will be able to!😄

Edit: Now I understand what you wrote! Silly me!

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1 hour ago, fraufruit said:

 

Can't get blood out of a turnip.

Yep.

However I think that if you´re not insured the hospital only has to treat you if it´s life threatening.

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3 minutes ago, Keleth said:

Yep.

However I think that if you´re not insured the hospital only has to treat you if it´s life threatening.

There's still a bill.

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2 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

Isn't there some kind of social health insurance for those who can't afford it? The U.S. has Medicaid. It's crap but it's free.

In Germany, there are all the rules for the unemployed etc but it's complicated and there are complicated and contradictory Catch 22 rules for non-Germans ( sometimes EU nationals ) .. you wouldn't believe it.

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2 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

Isn't there some kind of social health insurance for those who can't afford it? The U.S. has Medicaid. It's crap but it's free.

 

For those who are eligible for ALG ii they get their health insurance paid for by the job center.  However, if they are stuck in some kind of limbo where they aren't eligible for public insurance, I don't know what happens but I doubt that the job center will fork out for private.

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And don't forget those who have private health insurance and due to a change of circumstances can no longer pay for it, the monthly charges will continue to be added to the debt but only emergency treatment will be given. You may not be able to get blood out of a stone but if a health debtor survives and things improve the debt will have to be paid despite normal treatment having been withdrawn. I know a lady who was self employed and privately insured who ran into this problem when her business began failing, in the end she only managed to get out of the problem and receive treatment for non life threatening issues when she married and was included on her husbands public health insurance.

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4 hours ago, cb6dba said:

PR parties can end up in government with less than 50%, the just have to do it with other parties.

 

Yes it is called a coalition and it usually  means the party that won most votes does not have outright control and in fact in some circumstance may not even be in the government, for example in the most recent German election the CDU/CSU had the potential to put together a coalition with more than 50% that excluded the SPD! How fair is that?

In my lifetime I have seen 2 coalition governments in the UK, 3 if you include May's deal with the DUP, none of them did much to recommend it.

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4 hours ago, fraufruit said:

 

Can't get blood out of a turnip.

 

I genuinely have never thought about getting blood out of a turnip. A quick Goggle and my computer says "NO".

 

I'm now thinking about you adding a turnip to your Carmen Miranda. The average turnip weighs about 5kg. Do you really want that extra weight on your neck/shoulders?

 

I'd say no, but as always be your own independant woman.

 

I'm drunk and time for bed. :wacko:

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32 minutes ago, Chelski said:

The average turnip weighs about 5kg.

Are you sure you are not thinking about a pumpkin? I'm fairly sure the average turnip weighs in at about 1 kg.:D

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58 minutes ago, keith2011 said:

Are you sure you are not thinking about a pumpkin? I'm fairly sure the average turnip weighs in at about 1 kg.:D

Bloody pumpkins!

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4 hours ago, keith2011 said:

And don't forget those who have private health insurance and due to a change of circumstances can no longer pay for it, the monthly charges will continue to be added to the debt but only emergency treatment will be given. 

 

This can also happen with public. I know someone who has a business. Tax return showed that he had made more money than expected back in 2018. Suddenly he owes AOK 5000€. Since then, COVID hit and he doesn't have the extra money anymore. He asked to make monthly payments to clear his debt. They said ok so he's paying 500 a month towards his debts plus his monthly dues. Then tries to go to a doctor and finds that his health card is blocked. Asks AOK and they say yes, were blocking it until you're paid up.

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10 hours ago, john g. said:

There's still a bill.

Yes but my point was that you can´t just turn up at hospital and expect to be treated without insurance unless it´s life threatening even if you think they´ll just bill you for it.

If I remember it also has to be life threatening there and then and not long term such as cancer etc.

Was a few years ago that I saw the report on this so not 100% sure but I remember there being a cancer sufferer on it and he wasn´t treated until the TV station paid for his treatment.

 

 

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8 hours ago, keith2011 said:

 

Yes it is called a coalition and it usually  means the party that won most votes does not have outright control and in fact in some circumstance may not even be in the government, for example in the most recent German election the CDU/CSU had the potential to put together a coalition with more than 50% that excluded the SPD! How fair is that?

In my lifetime I have seen 2 coalition governments in the UK, 3 if you include May's deal with the DUP, none of them did much to recommend it.

I think you're missing he point there as well.

In that situation the people voted, received the number of representatives they voted for and then those representatives tried to build a government. 

 

If you think the situation you describe is unfair, what you you say to to the UK system delivering a government with the minority vote percentage? Could easily happen, would you say that was unfair?

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8 minutes ago, cb6dba said:

If you think the situation you describe is unfair, what you you say to to the UK system delivering a government with the minority vote percentage? Could easily happen, would you say that was unfair?

Both ways are unfair but FPTP is the worse of the 2.

When you have a coalition why should a party that got a small % of votes have a say.

Then in FPTP you get a majority even with a low % of the vote.

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1 hour ago, cb6dba said:

If you think the situation you describe is unfair, what you you say to to the UK system delivering a government with the minority vote percentage? Could easily happen, would you say that was unfair?

In fact it's normally what happens. I believe you have to go back to 1932 to find the last UK government elected with a majority of the popular vote!

 

As I said, it's an elected dictatorship that sometimes as much as two thirds of the electorate doesn't want. It's an appalling system. PR would never have allowed these "sub-movements" like the ERG or Momentum to hold the sort of sway they did over their respective parties because they would have been forced out to form their own fringe parties. The fact UKIP managed 12% of the popular vote but had no representation in parliament is why they infiltrated the Conservatives. If they had had their fair share of seats then they could have debated "Europe" in parliament to their hearts' content, without wrecking the UK.

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55 minutes ago, Keleth said:

Both ways are unfair but FPTP is the worse of the 2.

When you have a coalition why should a party that got a small % of votes have a say.

Then in FPTP you get a majority even with a low % of the vote.

The small party gets a smaller say, typically. Ultimately the government has to govern for all, not just those that voted for them. In PR everyone is slightly unhappy. With FPTP half the people are really unhappy. 

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11 minutes ago, murphaph said:

With FPTP half the people are really unhappy. 

 

Yes, but that makes the other half really, really happy.

 

Stigginit and all that.

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