What's the issue with dual nationality?

271 posts in this topic

Sorry, maybe not clear enough.  What is meant by automatic.  If you are born in Germany with one German parent, and other parent is citizen of a country that allows automatic citizenship by descent.    Say a child born here now post-Brexit, with German mother and British father (who was born in the UK).

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1 minute ago, snowingagain said:

Sorry, maybe not clear enough.  What is meant by automatic.  If you are born in Germany with one German parent, and other parent is citizen of a country that allows automatic citizenship by descent.    Say a child born here now post-Brexit, with German mother and British father (who was born in the UK).

And I know of more than a few kids born and raised in the US, with just one German parent, who are not forced to choose.  

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34 minutes ago, snowingagain said:

Sorry, maybe not clear enough.  What is meant by automatic.  If you are born in Germany with one German parent, and other parent is citizen of a country that allows automatic citizenship by descent.    Say a child born here now post-Brexit, with German mother and British father (who was born in the UK).

 

If the kid is raised here then it is allowed to keep the German one post 21st birthday.

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3 minutes ago, Krieg said:

 

If the kid is raised here then it is allowed to keep the German one post 21st birthday.

 

This is if neither parent is German.  If one is German, you do not have to choose at 21.

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German Citizenship - Federal Foreign Office (auswaertiges-amt.de)

 

As well as German nationality, our child has had a second nationality since birth. Does our child have to choose between the two later in life?

 

No, as far as German law is concerned, if your child automatically had two nationalities at birth, he/she does not have to decide between the two at a later stage. Your child is therefore a permanent holder of dual nationality. 

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19 minutes ago, snowingagain said:

 

This is if neither parent is German.  If one is German, you do not have to choose at 21.

 

Yes, correct, I missed the part about one parent being German.

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2 hours ago, BethAnnBitt said:

And I know of more than a few kids born and raised in the US, with just one German parent, who are not forced to choose.  

though this is still true, I think now if you live abroad you have to let the local embassy about the child's birth before their 1st birthday.

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1 hour ago, snowingagain said:

though this is still true, I think now if you live abroad you have to let the local embassy about the child's birth before their 1st birthday.

If you’re a German citizen, born abroad, and your child is born abroad, then that rule seems to apply. 

https://www.germany.info/us-en/service/03-Citizenship/german-citizenship-acquired-through-notification-of-birth-occuring-abroad/943378

 

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3 hours ago, snowingagain said:

German Citizenship - Federal Foreign Office (auswaertiges-amt.de)

 

As well as German nationality, our child has had a second nationality since birth. Does our child have to choose between the two later in life?

 

No, as far as German law is concerned, if your child automatically had two nationalities at birth, he/she does not have to decide between the two at a later stage. Your child is therefore a permanent holder of dual nationality. 

 

This is an eye opener.  My daughter has German and British nationality but neither of us are German.  Based on the link she will not be able to retain both as an adult as she must choose one or the other.  Will she not have the right, like other German citizens, to request that she retain her citizenship and also take up GB citizenship?

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36 minutes ago, bennetn said:

 

This is an eye opener.  My daughter has German and British nationality but neither of us are German.  Based on the link she will not be able to retain both as an adult as she must choose one or the other.  Will she not have the right, like other German citizens, to request that she retain her citizenship and also take up GB citizenship?

So was she born in the UK, or she was British at birth as you are British, and then later got German citizenship by naturalisation before Brexit?  In that case she is also fine. 

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1 hour ago, bennetn said:

 

This is an eye opener.  My daughter has German and British nationality but neither of us are German.  Based on the link she will not be able to retain both as an adult as she must choose one or the other.  Will she not have the right, like other German citizens, to request that she retain her citizenship and also take up GB citizenship?

 

This might apply to your daughter (?):

https://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/en/einreiseundaufenthalt/staatsangehoerigkeitsrecht-node/optionsregelung-node

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16 hours ago, bennetn said:

 

This is an eye opener.  My daughter has German and British nationality but neither of us are German.  Based on the link she will not be able to retain both as an adult as she must choose one or the other.  Will she not have the right, like other German citizens, to request that she retain her citizenship and also take up GB citizenship?

 

If she was born with both citizenship and she is raised here she would be able to keep the German one.  I put in a previous post in this thread what "raised here" means.

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19 hours ago, snowingagain said:

 

So was she born in the UK, or she was British at birth as you are British, and then later got German citizenship by naturalisation before Brexit?  In that case she is also fine. 

No, born here.  Mother is an EU citizen and I had perm residence (as EU member at that time) so birth registered in DE.  She has British passport now also as British citizen but at some point in her later life she will need to apply for "full" British citizenship in which case it sounds (reading the FAQ link) that she will have a choice to make.

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3 minutes ago, bennetn said:

No, born here.  Mother is an EU citizen and I had perm residence (as EU member at that time) so birth registered in DE.  She has British passport now also as British citizen but at some point in her later life she will need to apply for "full" British citizenship in which case it sounds (reading the FAQ link) that she will have a choice to make.

If you are British she is automatically British.  Fully British!   But possibly not fully German, as per Krieg's post.  So she has to decide at 21 whether to rescind British (costs a bit but not much) to remain German.   My son born here is British, but also has other EU citizenship through his father.  Eldest has both too, but decided to naturalise German before Brexit, to avoid the hassle and cost of giving up UK citizenship.

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I'm wondering about my granddaughter (5 years old). My son (50 years old) British born, who naturalised German a few years ago (due to Brexit) therefore holds dual British/German citizenship. His daughter (my granddaughter) was born later. She's officially German, though I'm not sure whether she's also entitled to British citzenship (maybe due to descent) and whether it's an automatic right or whether she has to apply for it. There's another twist. Her mother originally is Filipina but naturalised German (having to renounce her Philppine citizenship) a couple of years after the daughter's birth. So, at the time of her birth her father was dual British/German and her mother was a citizen of the Philippines. I'm wondering if it's possible that she is entitled to all three citizenships. 

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32 minutes ago, bramble said:

I'm wondering about my granddaughter (5 years old). My son (50 years old) British born, who naturalised German a few years ago (due to Brexit) therefore holds dual British/German citizenship. His daughter (my granddaughter) was born later. She's officially German, though I'm not sure whether she's also entitled to British citzenship (maybe due to descent) and whether it's an automatic right or whether she has to apply for it. There's another twist. Her mother originally is Filipina but naturalised German (having to renounce her Philppine citizenship) a couple of years after the daughter's birth. So, at the time of her birth her father was dual British/German and her mother was a citizen of the Philippines. I'm wondering if it's possible that she is entitled to all three citizenships. 

Pretty sure she is automatically British.

Check if you're a British citizen: Born outside the UK or stateless - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

 

 

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47 minutes ago, bramble said:

I'm wondering about my granddaughter (5 years old). My son (50 years old) British born, who naturalised German a few years ago (due to Brexit) therefore holds dual British/German citizenship. His daughter (my granddaughter) was born later. She's officially German, though I'm not sure whether she's also entitled to British citzenship (maybe due to descent) and whether it's an automatic right or whether she has to apply for it. There's another twist. Her mother originally is Filipina but naturalised German (having to renounce her Philppine citizenship) a couple of years after the daughter's birth. So, at the time of her birth her father was dual British/German and her mother was a citizen of the Philippines. I'm wondering if it's possible that she is entitled to all three citizenships. 

 

She's definitely British. Nothing more has to be done there.

 

I guess she was Filipino at birth, and I would assume still is.

 

She's provisionally German (if I am understanding it all correctly - neither parent was German at the time of birth?). At the age of 21 she'll have to choose between British/Filipino or German citizenship unless she fulfils the following:

 

Quote
  • has been habitually resident in Germany for at least eight years,
  • attended school in Germany for at least six years

or

  • completed their schooling or vocational training in Germany.

 

 

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22 minutes ago, snowingagain said:

 

Thanks. Will have to check whether we can register her as British just to be on the safe side (you never know). No need for British passport at present. She has a German one. 

 

5 minutes ago, theGman said:

She's provisionally German (if I am understanding it all correctly - neither parent was German at the time of birth?). At the age of 21 she'll have to choose between British/Filipino or German citizenship unless she fulfils the following:

 

She's definitely German. Her father was dual British/German at the time of her birth. I'll have to look into the Filipino possibility when I have more time. Not urgent. Thanks for the links.

 

 

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