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USAJobs.gov - questions on seeking work via this site

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Me again, with another question! Sorry if you get sick of me...I'm deep in gathering all the information we could possibly need to figure out before moving!

 

I have some questions about if you get a job through USAJobs. (Let's ignore the fact that it takes forever and all the other details.) Say it happens.

 

Does anyone know about health insurance with this? And taxes? Do you pay German taxes and receive public health insurance (this is what I'm hoping for) or do you pay US taxes and end up having US health insurance? How does that then work as far as if you need medical care? Are you required to go to the military base or can you go anywhere?

 

I'm familiar with Tricare because I had that for the majority of my life and would prefer not to receive all my healthcare on a military base (sorry...I just haven't had positive experiences with that.) We're trying to figure out if it's worth going the USAJobs route or if we're better off just trying to find a job in Germany. 

 

I don't believe this matters but I'm a German citizen. I haven't been on German health insurance since I was a kid so I don't think I can just go back to it and pay for it though, correct me if I'm wrong on that!

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6 hours ago, mlynn said:

I don't believe this matters but I'm a German citizen. I haven't been on German health insurance since I was a kid so I don't think I can just go back to it and pay for it though, correct me if I'm wrong on that!

It matters.

 

As a German citizen, you can rejoin your old public health insurer under §5 (1) Nr. 13 a) SGB V: https://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/sgb_5/__5.html

This is regardless of what profession you had in the interim, i.e. while you were away from Germany.

But you would have to ask your parents which Krankenkasse it was that you were insured with as a child (you will have had free cover under your parents' public health insurance through Familienversicherung), since only that specific Krankenkasse has to take you back.

Please see here:

 

Being a German citizen, even if you had never been a member of public health insurance, i.e. if you had never lived in Germany, German public health insurance would have to accept you as a member under §5 (1) Nr. 13 b.) SGB V: https://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/sgb_5/__5.html 

But only as long as you hadn't ever been self-employed in the interim, which is what that reference to "Absatz 5" is about and regarding the reference to "§6 Absatz 1" as long as you hadn't ever been a high-earning employee with a salary above the Versicherungspflichtgrenze nor a civil servant nor a member of the clergy nor a judge nor a soldier, since these professions usually have private health insurance in Germany.

For details, please see here:

 

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5 hours ago, mlynn said:

Does anyone know about health insurance with this? And taxes? Do you pay German taxes and receive public health insurance (this is what I'm hoping for) or do you pay US taxes and end up having US health insurance? How does that then work as far as if you need medical care? Are you required to go to the military base or can you go anywhere?

 

I don't believe this matters but I'm a German citizen.

 


Your citizenship does matter.  Read the 'who may apply' portion.  It is rare that a US Government department or agency hire non-US citizens through USAJobs.  Very rare.  As an example, the FBI and DoJ hire from USAJobs.  To be an FBI agent or US Attorney or anyone who works for them, one must be a US Citizen. 

Insurance is handled through the US Government.  It's not Tricare.  Tricare is for military members and their families. 

Where one is stationed is solely based upon the job and the department or agency to whom they are working.  If the job provider is part of the DoD, then yes a military base is possible, but not 100%.  If the job is being offered by the DoE or DoI, then most like no as they don't normally operate on a military installation.

Your first hurdle is the citizenship.

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4 hours ago, BayrischDude said:


Your first hurdle is the citizenship.


My post may have been confusing. I’m a dual citizen- German and US. So I can apply for jobs on USAJobs. My partner is also a US citizen. Sorry for the confusion! 

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6 hours ago, PandaMunich said:

But you would have to ask your parents which Krankenkasse it was that you were insured with as a child (you will have had free cover under your parents' public health insurance through Familienversicherung), since only that specific Krankenkasse has to take you back.

 

 


Well this is exciting news! I thought I had heard this at some point but for some reason assumed that was too easy and can’t be true. I do know which I had so that part is easy at least!

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4 hours ago, BayrischDude said:

Insurance is handled through the US Government.  It's not Tricare.  Tricare is for military members and their families. 

Correct. But I’ve had Tricare (through one of my parents and then later on my partner) and used it as an example to share that I’ve had enough experience with medical care on US military bases to know I am not up for doing that again. I want to make sure it would not be similar in a job through USAJobs. 

 

But it sounds like it’s somewhat irrelevant because being German citizen (well dual citizen) and having had German public health insurance before means I should be able to go back to that same insurance. 

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7 hours ago, PandaMunich said:

But only as long as you hadn't ever been self-employed in the interim, which is what that reference to "Absatz 5" is about and regarding the reference to "§6 Absatz 1" as long as you hadn't ever been a high-earning employee with a salary above the Versicherungspflichtgrenze nor a civil servant nor a member of the clergy nor a judge nor a soldier, since these professions usually have private health insurance in Germany.

 

I've been in the US since leaving Germany as a kid so I don't think I would meet any of those disqualifying factors like self-employment or income. I imagine that my US health insurance doesn't count against me. Even if my income did, I wouldn't meet the high-earning threshold in the US.

 

I guess the confusing part is that here in the US I taught for a little while and was hired as a "contractor" for this job so I wasn't directly employed by the school. I don't know if that counts as "self-employment" because it was in the US, not Germany. It certainly wasn't full time. It was more like part-part-time with low pay. 

 

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1 minute ago, mlynn said:


My post may have been confusing. I’m a dual citizen- German and US. So I can apply for jobs on USAJobs. My partner is also a US citizen. Sorry for the confusion! 

 

Your dual citizenship with Germany is an immediate disqualifier for all GS, GG, Non-Appropriated Funds (NAF) jobs, or contractor positions reserved for Technical Expert/Analytic Support/Troop Care personnel in Germany.  Your dual citizenship is also an impediment if the job requires a U.S. security clearance.  There is an adjudication process for the clearance, but I don't know of any dual citizens who were able to make it through that process.

 

Article I of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Status of Forces Agreement (NATO SOFA) states a person who is a citizen of, or ordinarily resident in, the Receiving State (Germany in this case) is not considered a civilian component of the Sending State (U.S.) forces.  This means you will not be authorized any of the benefits associated with SOFA, such as shopping at the Commissary, PX, or using any of the facilities and services reserved for the U.S. Forces and civilians accompanying the U.S. Forces.  Likewise, Articles 71, 72, and 73 of the NATO SOFA Supplementary Agreement exclude German citizens from receiving SOFA benefits as contractors.

 

Your dual citizenship with Germany is not an issue if you apply for a job in Belgium, Italy, or any other NATO country.  However, the dual citizenship will still be an issue for a U.S. security clearance.

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Just now, JG52 said:

 

Your dual citizenship with Germany is an immediate disqualifier for all GS, GG, Non-Appropriated Funds (NAF) jobs, or contractor positions reserved for Technical Expert/Analytic Support/Troop Care personnel in Germany.  Your dual citizenship is also an impediment if the job requires a U.S. security clearance.  There is an adjudication process for the clearance, but I don't know of any dual citizens who were able to make it through that process.

 

Article I of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Status of Forces Agreement (NATO SOFA) states a person who is a citizen of, or ordinarily resident in, the Receiving State (Germany in this case) is not considered a civilian component of the Sending State (U.S.) forces.  This means you will not be authorized any of the benefits associated with SOFA, such as shopping at the Commissary, PX, or using any of the facilities and services reserved for the U.S. Forces and civilians accompanying the U.S. Forces.  Likewise, Articles 71, 72, and 73 of the NATO SOFA Supplementary Agreement exclude German citizens from receiving SOFA benefits as contractors.

 

Your dual citizenship with Germany is not an issue if you apply for a job in Belgium, Italy, or any other NATO country.  However, the dual citizenship will still be an issue for a U.S. security clearance.

 

This is fascinating! It also makes a lot of sense. I always knew there were a few things I'd be prevented from doing because of dual citizenship but never knew what. 

I wonder if this prevents my partner (US citizen only) from applying to these jobs since we are married and I am the dual citizen? I guess, your point about security clearance, I could see it being taken into account should it be a job that requires a high security clearance or something? I could be wrong but that's what I would guess. 

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4 minutes ago, mlynn said:

 

This is fascinating! It also makes a lot of sense. I always knew there were a few things I'd be prevented from doing because of dual citizenship but never knew what. 

I wonder if this prevents my partner (US citizen only) from applying to these jobs since we are married and I am the dual citizen? I guess, your point about security clearance, I could see it being taken into account should it be a job that requires a high security clearance or something? I could be wrong but that's what I would guess. 

 

Your U.S.-citizen partner is free to apply for any GS, GG, NAF, or contractor job in Germany.  Your German citizenship has no impact on your partner's job prospects or security clearance.  If your partner is hired for any SOFA-protected job in Germany, you will receive a Dependent ID card that will allow you all of the benefits your partner receives, such as shopping at the Commissary and PX, registering vehicles through the U.S. military system, and access to the U.S. Postal System (APO).

 

Depending on where the job is, neither you nor your partner will be able to use the U.S. military medical facilities.  There are TRICARE authorized providers near each military community, but I think they are all German.  This is an area where I have very little experience, so I can't help.

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1 hour ago, JG52 said:

 

Your dual citizenship is also an impediment if the job requires a U.S. security clearance.  There is an adjudication process for the clearance, but I don't know of any dual citizens who were able to make it through that process.


I know several dual citizens who got security clearances, including myself. However, clearances come with strict and sometimes arbitrary rules, and it’s highly unlikely they will let you work in the country of your dual citizenship. The processing will also take a loooong time. And, the people I knew in those positions all got their clearances for jobs located in the US (at least at first). 
 

Like @JG52 said, your husband can get a clearance much easier. It’ll still take longer than normal to process if he has any foreign contacts such as your German relatives. 

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On 18/09/2021, 14:08:11, mlynn said:

 

I've been in the US since leaving Germany as a kid so I don't think I would meet any of those disqualifying factors like self-employment or income. I imagine that my US health insurance doesn't count against me. Even if my income did, I wouldn't meet the high-earning threshold in the US.

 

I guess the confusing part is that here in the US I taught for a little while and was hired as a "contractor" for this job so I wasn't directly employed by the school. I don't know if that counts as "self-employment" because it was in the US, not Germany. It certainly wasn't full time. It was more like part-part-time with low pay. 

 

 

Since this is about the second option, §5 (1) Nr. 13 b.) SGB V: https://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/sgb_5/__5.html

i.e. about people who have never had either public or private health insurance in Germany, this does not apply to you.

You will simply go back to your old German public health insurer, under clause a.), i.e. under §5 (1) Nr. 13 a.) SGB V.

 

I had just put in the conditions under clause b.) for completeness' sake, i.e. if the next person along who read this thread had German citizenship, but had never before lived in Germany and never had German public health insurance and therefore had no choice but to try to get into German public health insurance through clause b.). 

These people will only be accepted by German public health insurance if during their whole lives anywhere worldwide, they had:

  • never been self-employed
  • never been a high-earning employee, i.e. an employee with a salary above the Versicherungspflichtgrenze, for example for 2020 the limit would have been 62,550€ gross salary per year
  • never practised one of the "harmful" professions (civil servant, member of the clergy, judge, soldierofficer of the European Commission)

 

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Even if you did have Tricare, you could still use German doctors.  My husband is retired military, so we get Tricare.  But when he needed to see a urologist, he saw a German provider.  One of his colleagues’ wives got cancer and got all of her treatment from German providers, mainly because they had immediate availability when Landstuhl didn’t.

 

 

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