What will my US car need for TÜV?

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We are looking to ship our 2011 Subaru Outback from the US to Germany. I'm reading about the TÜV conversion requirements, and I'm wondering if there's any easy way to get a ballpark idea of how much alteration would be needed in this car. Thanks for any tips.

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This has been mentioned before, could be quite expensive. How much would you pay to get it shipped to Germany?

 

Might make sense to sell it over there and buy another vehicle over here.

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8 minutes ago, Dani L said:

We are looking to ship our 2011 Subaru Outback from the US to Germany

 

5 minutes ago, Fietsrad said:

Might make sense to sell it over there and buy another vehicle over here.

 

as soon as I saw "2011" I thought shipping it was not the best choice.   

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It’s a 2011 car. Do yourself a favor and sell it and buy here. TUeV will have a field day with it. 

 

I’m going to guess that TUeV will require like 2000 (possibly more) in repairs. The big thing is the exhaust system and emissions. This is just a guess remember. Then you will have to probably pay more in tax because it is a big car. You will also need winter and summer tires. Plus shipping and customs. 

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5 hours ago, klingklang77 said:

You will also need winter and summer tires.

 

Not true - you need suitable tires for the Winter.  When we purchased our last cars we had them equipped with Ganzjahresreifen which for us (near Hamburg) work fine.  If you would live in a hilly / mountainous area with lots snow then Summer & Winter tires are sensible.

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No idea of the cost, but it really sounds like it could be a massive hassle. I guess the car has sentimental value? If not, I don't think you're doing yourself a favor by importing it. Don't forget that Subarus aren't as popular here, so repairs and parts could get expensive too.

 

I guess if you're importing it as a military family, it could be different. I don't know too much about it, but I have heard it's a better deal?

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As mentioned subaru is not a brand that is common here although it exists. In my opionion used car prices are currently very high in the us...they have went up more than here. So it would be a perfect time to sell avoiding the cost of any conversion, transport if you are paying it etc. As well as all the hassle to do all the hassle of tuv after a move. Also keep in mind unless you ship it back selling it here would lead to a big loss. Germans want to see service stamps from the day the car is new which you will not have and also that fact that it was not a germany sourced  car will strongly affect any later resale.

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8 hours ago, HEM said:

 

Not true - you need suitable tires for the Winter.  When we purchased our last cars we had them equipped with Ganzjahresreifen which for us (near Hamburg) work fine.  If you would live in a hilly / mountainous area with lots snow then Summer & Winter tires are sensible.

 

Well, yeah, that’s true. I’m in Munich and I do take trips in lower Bavaria, so I need winter tires. 

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My advice is to not ship a car from the US to Germany, unless as other says, it has sentimental value. 

 

We moved to Germany in 2019 and shipped our 2015 Audi in the same container as our household belongings since we had the space. We thought it would be a better to bring it with us, even knowing it would need to go through the certification process.  It was such a hassle having to coordinate between the companies that handle the different pieces, and in the end cost us about 5k EUR for shipping, customs, changes, certification plus transport from where the work was performed in Hamburg down to Munich (we used a car shop close to the port our container arrived at). Also, it took 2 months for our container to arrive to Germany plus another 6-8 weeks to go through all of changes & certification, so we used a car share for 4 months before our own car arrived.

 

Some things that got changed were the lights (e.g. EU certified, blinker lights changed from red to yellow), the cleaning mechanism for the headlights, changing the speedometer to km, license plate holders, we did have to buy winter tires but that would have been required anyway. We didn't have to worry about emissions since we came from CA where they are pretty strict on this and the car went through regular certifications.

 

Before we moved, we contacted 3 or 4 different car shops that could do the work & certification for us and we had a hard time getting them to nail down a quote on costs because everything depends on the car. We also spoke to some places that were a little grey in how they get the cars to pass certification... so watch out for that too.  Definitely call places ahead of time to ask for quotes if you are going to do this.

 

In the end, the car passed certification and was delivered to us just fine. But in hindsight, it was more stress than was worth it. 

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Thanks everyone for the input. 🙏🏻 I'll do a little more research, but sheesh, it sounds stressful – and I thought I'd be saving some stress by not having to sell it here and buy another car there :lol:. Sounds like it'd be less work to go that route after all.

 

The car is sentimental - it was my mom's who passed a few years ago. Also it was a "granny car" meaning barely driven: 10 years old but only about 57K miles. But it sounds like even the age of the car alone, plus all the other factors you've brought up, could require quite significant hassle.

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27 minutes ago, jill_ said:

My advice is to not ship a car from the US to Germany, unless as other says, it has sentimental value.

Professionals import classics like Ford Mustang ‘65, Corvette Stingray ‘69, etc. They earn good money on it. 

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