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Woodworkers/Carpenters in Berlin with a planer machine?

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Hello everyone, are there any woodworkers/carpenters in Berlin that have a planer machine that can fit a baord that is 40cm wide and 3 cm thick? I have two live edge boards that around about 1.4 meters long and they have some warping/cuping. I've attempted the DIY methods to flatten them out, such as moisture on one side to cup in the opposite direction, etc. These methods have helped to a minimal degree. What I really need is to feed them through a planner machine and flatten them out properly. 

 

Does anyone here have access to this kind of equipment. Again, it's just two boards and I'm sure the whole process would take less than 10 minutes. I'm of course willing to pay for the service :) Let me know if you're able to help. 

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I can't help you because I'm too far away and my jointer/planer (planer/thicknesser in the UK) isn't that wide.  A local shop with a Hammer A3-41, or similar machine, should be able to flatten your slabs.  Unless I wanted to tackle the slabs by hand, which is how I learned many years ago, I would use a router sled to flatten a large slab.  Depending on how much cupping and twist (wind) those 3cm thick slabs have, you might not have much wood left after the board is flat and both sides are parallel.

 

All wood moves to some extent, and if your boards aren't sufficiently dried or aged, they might not be done moving.  I only buy kiln-dried timber and leave slabs in my shop for several weeks to stabilize before I start resawing or cutting them to size.  Sometimes there is still movement after resawing, so they go back on the rack for a few more weeks to recover.  If your boards still have a high moisture content, then any flattening now might not accomplish much other than making them thinner with more wind later as the stresses are relieved and it dries out.

 

When I work with a slab that has too much cupping or wind, I will rip it into smaller strips, joint and plane the strips to a uniform thickness, and then glue them back together into a larger slab with alternating ring patterns.  This retains most of the original slab width, reduces the amount of material that must be removed to flatten, and makes the new slab more stable.  The glued joint is stronger than the wood grain, so there is no issue with the jointed strips failing.

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https://www.offene-werkstaetten.org/

 

Look there for the werkstatt nearby with the tools/machines you require.

 

We have a local one here in Munich/Bavaria (where everything is better) that has all the standard large tools of a carpentry shop. You pay per minute but it is much more of a club/verein. Surprisingly, most people still have their fingers.

They might ask you to do a training for any given piece of machinery. Worth it, bunch of 68ers need the support and friends.

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