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German Einschulung vs. American 1st day of school

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15 minutes ago, MikeMelga said:

here they expect for the kid to learn at home, even if the parents can't read! That's fucked up!
 

 

I find amusing that a project manager can't solve this situation.  Because for us it was super easy, barely an inconvenience, we support them in the subjects that we can and find help in the ones that can't.   A combination of asking the neighbors, asking our friends (you know, there are tablets and the kids can use them to video-conference with other people, amazing times), paying the neighbor kid for tuition, using the tuition system offered by the school itself, and so on.    And the WhatsApp group from the helicopter parents, that has been a godsend even if I dread to check it.

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7 minutes ago, Krieg said:

 

I find amusing that a project manager can't solve this situation.  Because for us it was very easy, barely an inconvenience, we support them in the subjects that we can and find help in the ones that can't.   A combination of asking the neighbors, asking our friends (you know, there are tablets and the kids can use them to video-conference with other people, amazing times), paying the neighbor kid for tuition, using the tuition system offered by the school itself, and so on.    And the WhatsApp group from the helicopter parents, that has been a godsend even if I dread to check it.

Neighbours? When we made this decision we were living in an apartment where most neighbours would refuse their kids to talk or play with mine! One called the police once saying we were making too much noise, but we haven't been home for 4 days! Or the time they called the police to tow our car from the front of their window, although it was a place marked for parking!

Sure, it was a fucked up evangelic neighborhood, I could also try to search for a more generous place to live... or just pick a decent school!

 

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On 11/09/2021, 20:54:12, kiplette said:

In the UK, the kids get brought in to FS1 or the Reception class and left to weep with their new teacher, whilst the parents shove off (weeping or cheering, depending) until the end of the day. It is so much better here - a real rite of passage, and a great celebration.

Great summary of both the first day of school in the UK, and how it compares with Germany. From my experience, kids here in Germany are quite a bit more positive about school in general, than in England. I wonder whether it is precisely this sort of start to school life which sets them up for a more positive experience? 

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11 minutes ago, Krieg said:

Like always, it is the world against Mike.  And Portugal this and Portugal that.

If I told you the story of my 8 years in Germany, including all details I leave out, you would change your mind.

And I had to change country to realize how awesome Portugal is, even with all its defects.

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17 hours ago, dmbartender said:

Haha, well what can I say? If Oma wants to buy the Schulranzen, then I let her do that. She is from the DDR, where the start of school was celebrated even much more than in Bavaria.

 

Golly, absolutely. I'd be right there with you.

 

So what does Oma remember of Schulanfang in the DDR? 

 

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44 minutes ago, dstanners said:

I wonder whether it is precisely this sort of start to school life which sets them up for a more positive experience? 

 

I'm not sure I can agree with that. The first day of school is party time here and I think it gives some of the children a false impression of what's ahead of them.  My impression was that from day 2, after the party was over, it was down to solid, structured learning and I don't think all the children are prepared for that.  I may be wrong, but that's how it seemed to me when mine were going through it.

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I think it's great that a fuss is made for the first day of school in Germany. (Most) kids are actually excited. In the months leading up to the school year, everybody would ask you something (have you picked your Ranzen yet, Schultüte - bought or built, which design, where is your school etc.) which built up a sense of excitement and expectation.

School is a big step for most children. It might not be traumatic in the strict sense if their very first day is a full day and nothing special but why the f*** does it have to be?? 

Make a fuss, have a party, celebrate your kid for starting first grade. They will probably love it. The truth - that school is like everything else in life and sucks sometimes - will come soon enough. I really don't understand why anyone can have a problem with that. If course there are the parents that exaggerate and overdo things. And of course there are schools where having the most expensive Ranzen is considered cool. But that is not the case everywhere. 

 

Yes, schools should have better ways of online schooling - But they don't at the moment. Some do, but it is no a rule. 

Yes, all students should have fast internet at home - But they don't at the moment, and not all parents can offer network support if things go wrong. 

Yes, school books should be free - But they are not at the moment 

Yes, every student should have a tablet - But they don't at the moment (have you thought of abusive parents taking the kid's tablet and selling it? Or using it for themselves?) 

In the end, it is what it is and to change things will take time. Throwing money at the problem doesn't necessarily solve it right away. Also, it is difficult to generalize a topic so diverse as schooling, especially since there are huge differences between different Bundesländer. 

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7 hours ago, Tap said:

The first day of school is party time here and I think it gives some of the children a false impression of what's ahead of them. 

 

I do wonder about that, but I think as maxie says,the process is months long, the older Kiga kids are Schulhüpfer or Schulanfänger or whatever term is locally used, and do separate activities and preparation, and that celebration day is in a way the culmination of that, but like marriage, it has also transformed you from what you were, into what you now are, and that lays a responsibility on the child to live up to this new identity of being a Schoolchild. Therefore you are willing to accept the challenges ahead.

 

I think it's amazing. In kid#3 and #4's classes there was each time a child who shouldn't have really been there, and in each case they quietly went into a Vorschule class somewhere in town, and presumably repeated their Schulanfang the following year. This was not a disaster in either case, everyone just shrugged and got on with it. Extraordinary.

 

I did Anthropology as my degree so there is just a chance I have over-thought the whole shebang :lol:

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5 hours ago, kiplette said:

 

I do wonder about that, but I think as maxie says,the process is months long, the older Kiga kids are Schulhüpfer or Schulanfänger or whatever term is locally used, and do separate activities and preparation, and that celebration day is in a way the culmination of that, but like marriage, it has also transformed you from what you were, into what you now are, and that lays a responsibility on the child to live up to this new identity of being a Schoolchild. 

 

I heard from a friend's kid that there is a ceremony at Kiga where they kick out the oldest kids. She was born right after the cut off date but spent the kita years with the older group for some reason so it would have been sad for her to wait a year to go to school. They asked if she could start early and it wasn't a problem. She's in gymnasium now.

 

Another friends kid is starting a year late due to concerns about his command of German. He went to a Schulkindergarten last year and now started school and loves it. He'll be 8 in March.

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In some schools the children in the 2nd class are very involved, responsible for a little entertainment, telling the new ones their experiences, making 'welcome' decorations etc. They are now the ones 'in the know'. It's a little rite of passage for everyone.

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Just came back from the Einschulung of my youngest. Again extremely well done with lots of heart put into it. I’m very happy today.

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