New tenants want to come to our handover

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I apologize if this content exists elsewhere, but I could not find it here or through an internet search.

 

We are coordinating our termination letter and handover details with our landlord and he has informed us that the new tenants will possibly come to our handover appointment. I was surprised by this, as I've never heard of new tenants being involved in the final inspection. Our apartment is still in relatively good condition, with of course minor things we will repair, but it was my understanding that these details are between the old tenants and the landlord, not the new tenants and the old tenants.

 

Is this something that is common, and I'm just not aware of because we are relatively new in Germany? Is it appropriate that we ask that just the landlord is present?

 

I appreciate any insight from more experienced renters.

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well - technically your landlord has two appointments: one with you, the leaving party - and then another one with the next tenant, the incoming party.

It is quite common for landlords to minimize the time required by inviting both tenants to this event.

 

Not a problem really - your "Übergabeprotokoll bei Auszug" will serve as the new tenant's "Übergabeprtokoll bei Einzug".

 

If you don't want that (for whatever reason) simply tell your landlord. 

 

Long time ago, when I was still renting, I always found it beneficial to be able to talk to the next tenant (or the previous tenant) about things like Ablöse, Renovierung, or even the last half a month of rent so I can get out/in early. You just need to make sure the landlord is present (or an authorized representative).

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17 minutes ago, impossibledreamer said:

Our apartment is still in relatively good condition, with of course minor things we will repair, but it was my understanding that these details are between the old tenants and the landlord, not the new tenants and the old tenants.

 

Is this something that is common, and I'm just not aware of because we are relatively new in Germany? Is it appropriate that we ask that just the landlord is present?

 

I haven't heard of this being customary but Karin is probably right that your landlord wants to save time and not have two appointments.  Some details can be between the new and old tenants since the new tenants might want to buy your kitchen or other furniture or they might be planning to renovate anyway and will tell you not to bother.

 

You and the landlord may have witnesses at the handover, might even be a good idea but if you prefer the new tenants not be there, just say so.

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Thanks for your responses, Karin and Leon. I think we are a bit nervous because when these tenants toured our apartment, they asked a lot of questions regarding what renovations we would be doing. Its quite an old building and there are a lot of oddities, like gaps between the floor panels, under the baseboards, etc. We have the impression that these tenants expect much more than the landlord regarding renovations, including things that existed before we moved in. I know there are laws and clauses in the lease regarding these details, but we're still nervous about the resolution.

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When we moved into our previous house, the former tenant was there clearing out.  She was "buddies" with the former landlady, though, even though she was moving out sooner than planned.  I remember her stuff was in the trash cans as we were moving in.  This was okay with ex landlady, as was most everything the ex tenant did.  She had somehow convinced ex landlady that she was the daughter she never had, despite moving early, yet staying in the area.

 

Four years later, when it was our turn to move, ex landlady was a total nightmare.  We ended up suing her, in part because she tried to make us pay for things the ex tenants did.  Like, for instance, she charged us for having stuff in the trash cans, even though we paid her rent and Nebenkosten for the month we weren't even living there.  Fortunately, we prevailed in our lawsuit, but it wasn't without a lot of stress, expense, and irritation. 

 

To be honest, if I had to do it again, I would not want to meet the previous tenants.  The previous tenant in our situation ended up being in cahoots with the ex landlady as she tried to screw us.  I would not want to be involved with the next tenant's business at all.  But take that with a grain of salt, since I am also in the military community, and people tend to act more like they're still in high school in that population.

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36 minutes ago, impossibledreamer said:

We have the impression that these tenants expect much more than the landlord regarding renovations, including things that existed before we moved in.

 

Alarm, alarm, alarm. Trust your instincts, and then heed them !

If there is no good reason for you to deal with the new tennants, why would you tolerate their presence in your private business with your landlord?

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39 minutes ago, impossibledreamer said:

I think we are a bit nervous because when these tenants toured our apartment, they asked a lot of questions regarding what renovations we would be doing. Its quite an old building and there are a lot of oddities, like gaps between the floor panels, under the baseboards, etc. We have the impression that these tenants expect much more than the landlord regarding renovations, including things that existed before we moved in.

 

In that case, tell the landlord that you don't want the new tenants there at the handover.  Make sure that there is a handover report where everything you are supposed to do is in writing.  Have someone you know be present if you can so that they can verify what was said if you need to.  Your obligations are only to the landlord.  If the new tenants later bug the landlord that you didn't do x and y, you have it in writing from the landlord that you were not asked to.

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Once I dealt with a supervisor of a housing cooperation when I dissolved my parental house. He asked me if I allowed potential new tenants in for viewing. I agreed since I saw it as an opportunity to get rid of a lot of stuff like fridge, stove, kitchen table and chairs which worked out well. He also made up a list of things I needed to do like removing the electrical wiring in the shed since it would be completely renewed, remove the wallpaper in one room, remove the carpet on the stairs, etc.

 

My father built a fireplace in the living room in the 1970s which was approved by them, but I didn’t have to remove it thankfully. The new tenant had to remove it herself since she didn’t want it. I made that clear. Saved me 2 days at least. My parents also built a sink in a closet in a bedroom, but the supervisor didn’t notice it, nor did he discover that a door was missing between the kitchen and the hallway. I surely didn’t mention it, because I’m not a handyman. All things from the 1970s and no records of it (anymore). My parents lived there 46 years.

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play the covid card and simply say you are definitely not comfortable having strangers in your flat, vaccinated, tested, or otherwise.  

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Thanks for all your insightful responses. I think I will listen to my instincts and avoid having them at our handover. We have the added complication that they might buy our kitchen, but we've done the costs with our moving company and it's not terribly impractical to bring most of it with us. I don't want to engage a bidding war once they sign the lease and suddenly refuse the previously agreed upon price. So I think if they don't sign a contract to buy it before we hand in our official termination letter, we'll tell them we are taking it with us. 

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