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How do you find Austrian German?

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While visiting Vienna I couldn't make out what people were saying, it sounded so different than RTL Deutsch.

 

However lately I've been reading lots of Austrian websites & while they're in Standard Deutsch, it seems they use shorter phrases and less compound nouns than DE sites (even Bavarian ones).

 

Is it only me or are the Austrian people more likely to use shorter phrases and less compound nouns? Shorter legal terms, too (Meldezettel vs Meldebestätigung). Less -gung terms anyway! :) They even seem to use more Latin-derived words & even some Slavic. Is Austrian German easier to learn to read?

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Austrian accent is one the most beautiful accents of German.

 

Austro-Bavarian radeln is fahrradfahren in High German.  I wonder, how drunk one must have been to invent the word fahrradfahren?

 

Austrian is German without Hitler (ironically he was Austrian).

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If you cannot understand them, try talking a bit so they hear your hear your accent and realise you are a stranger. Then many talk slower and clearer.

 

Do Austrians generally use shorter words, or just different words?

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5 hours ago, Fietsrad said:

Do Austrians generally use shorter words, or just different words?

I don't really know but after investigating the various forms you have to fill in for your address registration it seems they're not as fond as Germans for using long compound nouns AND long sentences. Plus it seems their compound nouns have less consonants than German ones. Sometimes I feel DE Germans complicate terms for the sake of it. Meldezettel certianly seems neater and less scary than Meldebestätigung for people used to English or Latin. Germans use 5 extra letters for the same form.

Even if one takes the random names of Versicherung (health care) providers in DE and AU, the German names tend to be longer and have more consonant clusters as well, while Austrian ones tend to be both shorter or at least have more vowels. So to me the way the official language is used in both places is not the same at all. I guess despite other similarities with Austrians, Bavarians are still closer to other Germans in their formal language and legal terms. More headaches for us foreigners I guess (form of gatekeeping?). :D

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There are several videos on the lovely "Easy German" site that go into the Austrian/ German differences  E.g.

 

Whether your specific question is addressed I don't know.

I really enjoy their videos, there are loads covering specific grammar points, everyday and current topics, pronounciation... Good humoured and drawing on natural spoken language.

Each video is also subtitled in German and English.

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1 minute ago, BethAnnBitt said:

Me too.  The characters are fabulous.  So I use the subtitles in Hochdeutsch.  😂

 

Ha, I didn't even know there is that option. Thanks for the tip. :)

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14 minutes ago, bramble said:

Ha, I didn't even know there is that option. Thanks for the tip. :)

I watch on ARD Mediathek so I can use subtitles.  As I’ve mentioned before, that’s how I’ve been able to improve my German overall.  

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5 minutes ago, BethAnnBitt said:

I watch on ARD Mediathek so I can use subtitles.  As I’ve mentioned before, that’s how I’ve been able to improve my German overall.  

 

That is of course an extremely useful option I've never thought of after all these many years of watching Vienna Tatort. Thanks again for the tip. :) Will try it next time Vienna Tatort is on. 👍

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So my dilemma is being able to understand spoken language vs being able to read documents easily.

 

I don't think it's anything inherent in the Austrian German language per se, rather how officials choose to use it. It's not that Austrian German has shorter sentences than German German, but that Austrian bureaucrats, for whatever reason, make a greater effort to make their official documents readable.

 

E.g. Austrians would write "Bestätigung der meldung" or when using a single word Meldezettel. The former title, although having less letters than the oh-so German Meldebestätigung is friendlier to English or Romance speakers as its more akin to the structures used in their languages, i.e. French. My brain goes blank at words like Meldebestätigung but both Bestätigung der meldung and Meldezettel are easily processed. :D

 

This form from Vienna looks less scary than the equivalent form from any German city in my experience: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cf/Bestaetigung_der_meldung_2007-07-09.jpg

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On 8/21/2021, 1:52:14, bramble said:

I watch the Vienna Tatort https://www.daserste.de/unterhaltung/krimi/tatort/kommissare/team-wien-eisner-fellner-100.html quite often because I like the main characters Moritz and Bibi, even though half the time I can't understand the dialect. 

7 years in Bayern, and I am proud to fully understand Moritz & Bibi. I still watch Tatort here in Israel, I like the Vienna one precisely because of their accent. 

 

BTW Lidl is a short form for Ludwig typical for Bavaria and Austria, a lot of people have last names ending with -l, which is the same as High German diminutive -chen. The company itself however is not from Bavaria, the founder's last name was Schwarz. You do not want to open a supermarket in Germany with the name Schwarz Markt, so he found someone with the last name Lidl and bought the rights to the name. 

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If you cannot understand them, try speaking a few words in German with your English/American/.. accent. Many people automatically speak slower and clearer when confronted with an Outlander.

 

I think it is good to be sure not to call them 'Deutsch', just like Canadians do not like being called 'Americans'.

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On 19/08/2021, 23:08:39, bytex said:

... it seems they use shorter phrases and less compound nouns than DE sites.

 

Full points for observation. You may be onto something. Austrian sounds more clipped and nasalised to me.

(Still cannot understand a single word Adolf ever said in one of his ranting, raving, barking, screaming speeches though.)

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I was in Tirol over the weekend.

 

There is no word in Austrian German for 'mask'. And 'Abstand' must mean something different once you cross the border from Bavaria.

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The former title, although having less letters than the oh-so German Meldebestätigung is friendlier to English or Romance speakers as its more akin to the structures used in their languages, i.e. French.

 

I meant more of course. ;)

Btw, I watched the opening of The Sound Of Music and actually some places seen are in Bavaria:

scenery beginning of the Sound of Music - YouTube

This whole movie, but especially the opening scene is the best TV commercial of Austria and the Bavarian/Austrian borderland if there ever was one.

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