Is telling your boss that you are looking for a new job a good idea?

14 posts in this topic

A colleague of mine recently left the company. Apparently, from what we have been told

 

- When our new boss joined a few months ago, the first thing he told the new boss was "I hate this company, and I want to leave"

- A few months later, he notified the boss that he was starting to send out resumes, because he didn't see any improvements in the company, so he was fed up

 

I think this is very brave, but also very honest and transparent. My boss didn't seem angry that he left.

 

Do you think it's a good idea what he did?

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Of course he wasn't  angry the guy left - good riddance to bad rubbish.  With an attitude like that, the team is better off without him. 

I find that kind of behaviour incredibly rude.  

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7 minutes ago, catjones said:

why do you ask?

 

Because I will soon start looking for a new job too (the guy who left had good reasons), and I'm wondering what's worse

 

A. Not saying anything until I hand over my resignation, and then be accused of not having been honest and transparent (e.g. "You could have told us you didn't like this and that in your job, we could have tried to fix it, instead of just walk away")

B. Saying "I'm looking for a new job", and then being already labelled "a traitor"/"a troublemaker"

 

I would normally choose option A.

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26 minutes ago, maxie said:

Of course he wasn't  angry the guy left - good riddance to bad rubbish.  With an attitude like that, the team is better off without him. 

I find that kind of behaviour incredibly rude.  

 

You don't know him, you don't know the company, you don't know the boss.

 

He actually had very good reasons to not like the place.

 

And his attitude maybe is better than somebody who today says "Everything is fine, I like it here", and tomorrow hands over their resignation with an explanation "I don't like it here".

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2 minutes ago, UpToWick said:

 

Because I will soon start looking for a new job too (the guy who left had good reasons), and I'm wondering what's worse

 

A. Not saying anything until I hand over my resignation, and then be accused of not having been honest and transparent (e.g. "You could have told us you didn't like this and that in your job, we could have tried to fix it, instead of just walk away")

B. Saying "I'm looking for a new job", and then being already labelled "a traitor"/"a troublemaker"

 

I would normally choose option A.

 

Most people would probably choose option A because you are protecting your bread and butter until you have found something else.  Even though you choose option A, it doesn't mean you didn't already try to fix things.  The relationship between an employee and an employer can be complicated.  You may want to fix things but you may have a boss that doesn't make it easy.  If you get accused of not having been honest etc., you would be able to say sorry but I did tell you I didn't like this and that in my job, you didn't listen and so I had to go.

 

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Whether it's a good idea to be open about your job search depends on what kind of person your boss is and what kind of relationship you have with them. It may be a good or a bad idea depending on circumstances.

 

Certainly, and without any need to know your colleague, your company, nor the boss, welcoming your new boss by telling them "I hate this company" has nothing to do with transparency - it's just an act of sheer stupidity. You may have valid reasons to dislike the company - the moment you express them like that, your reasons count nothing. Is it so hard to stay professional? No wonder the boss wasn't angry...they were happy to see him off!

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well - I don't treat my jobs like family, I treat them like business. 

 

My dreams, feelings, plans, desires... are personal matters, not meant to be shared with business partners until they actually become tangible facts.

 

So (in case I was working on a job change) I'd tell my current employer about the upcoming change as soon as I have a signed contract in hand. 
Also, when I tell them, I wouldn't go deep into the personal reasons (like saying...."this job sux, so go shove it"...) I'd give business reasons like.... "the salary is higher", or "they offer an interesting career path", or even "the job is closer to home", "the schedule gives me better work/life balance".... whatever your reasons are, keep the "angry" ones to yourself.

 

Whatever you do, keep in mind that you meet everybody twice: on your way up, and then on your way down again.

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12 hours ago, UpToWick said:

Do you think it's a good idea what he did?

If he did that means:

1. He is confident to be able to find a new job very fast. 

2. He is not easily replaceable. His boss also needs time to find someone else for the job. 

 

I think this is good, in that circumstances. I usually helped my boss with interviews for a replacement candidate, but then I was in good relations, and I informed the boss after I had an offer at the new job, not at the point of sending resumees. 

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You could talk to your boss and discuss what it is bothering you, without saying you will look for a new job. If things do not change, then there will be no surprise when you quit.  I think this way is fair with both sides.

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16 hours ago, UpToWick said:

 

Because I will soon start looking for a new job too (the guy who left had good reasons), and I'm wondering what's worse

 

A. Not saying anything until I hand over my resignation, and then be accused of not having been honest and transparent (e.g. "You could have told us you didn't like this and that in your job, we could have tried to fix it, instead of just walk away")

B. Saying "I'm looking for a new job", and then being already labelled "a traitor"/"a troublemaker"

 

I would normally choose option A.

 

You are adding unknown reactions to your decisions.

Which of the two choices you mention would your employer select if they were to terminate your job?  Do you think they would be "honest and transparent" when considering the elimination of you or your job or would you feel "betrayed" if they told you "Hey, we're thinking about firing you and looking for your replacement"?

Save your confessions for the church.

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Saying you're looking for a new job means to the boss "I don't really want to leave. I want a payrise/promition/work on something different", and that can backfire, though the most likely way it backfires is that you allow yourself to be convinced by what turn out to be empty promises. You then end up spending another year at the company doing the crap that you hate when you should have moved on.

 

Better not to say anything. People leave; any decent employer knows that.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Dembo said:

Saying you're looking for a new job means to the boss "I don't really want to leave.

 

If an employee said that to me, it would mean the employee is leaving and I would start looking for a replacement.  I take people at their word.

If you 

1 hour ago, Dembo said:

want a payrise/promition/work on something different",

 say this:

"I want a payrise/promition/work on something different",

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On 22.6.2021, 23:05:31, UpToWick said:

You don't know him, you don't know the company, you don't know the boss.

 

He actually had very good reasons to not like the place.

 

And his attitude maybe is better than somebody who today says "Everything is fine, I like it here", and tomorrow hands over their resignation with an explanation "I don't like it here".

Nope, sorry. There is a whole world between "Everything is fine, I like it here" and "I hate this company, and I want to leave". Especially with somebody new coming in who might not be aware of the issues yet. For me, that is the opposite of a constructive attitude of somebody who wants to change things for the better. 

If you think the company is crap - leave. Or make suggestions to improve things. Don't greet the new guy with "Everything is sh*t here." 

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