Tea stains on kitchen counter

26 posts in this topic

Hallo zusammen,

 

Here there's a white laminate (I think) kitchen counter that appears to be an extra-super Ezy-stain surface. When I was first here over a year ago and hadn't paid too much attention to cleaning I obviously left something on there that left a couple of rings - I think tea but the rings are more plate sized. So probably just a spill. This was about the time that all the cleaning products disappeared from the shelves so I didn't have anything there and then to attack it with. 

 

When the hamsters had calmed down a bit I bought some typical cleaning stuff, but nothing helped. Google pointed me to using a baking soda paste, but that didn't do anything (it did remove a ring I'd got from a beetroot jar on the window sill and gets the spoons shiny). I found some spray with 5% bleach and that  seemed to make it fade so I figured if I kept using it it would eventually go. But some months later and it is still quite visible in daylight.

 

I'm reluctant to use bleach as I did that once before - it worked but obviously damaged the surface and left it feeling rough.

 

Any other suggestions? Just accept that I'm buying the Vemertin a new kitchen top when I leave?

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Oh, I have the same problem, but on my really nice  deep charcoal-grey laminate. Several water rings and tea stains which really show up. I've tried all the baking soda and other suggestions googling comes up with, even stainless steel cleaner was one. No success. (Had a quick go with black shoe polish too!!)

I'll have a look at the wax pen idea but am pretty resigned to eventually replacing the whole work surface.

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Thanks. Paint sounds like it'd work for a small fleck but for a bigger area you'd end up with a patch that didn't quite match the rest and then you'd end up trying to do all of it and you see where that leads.

 

So maybe bleach + wax to repair the damage done by the bleach is the way.

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I have a couple of stains on the counter- but have taken the home decor route. Nice  bamboo board and a straw mat cover them nicely!

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3 hours ago, RedMidge said:

I have a couple of stains on the counter- but have taken the home decor route. Nice  bamboo board and a straw mat cover them nicely!

and how exactly does thi help the OP and the stain on their worktop?  

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4 hours ago, Dembo said:

Thanks. Paint sounds like it'd work for a small fleck but for a bigger area you'd end up with a patch that didn't quite match the rest and then you'd end up trying to do all of it and you see where that leads.

 

So maybe bleach + wax to repair the damage done by the bleach is the way.

 

Try toothpaste.  It's supposed to get tea / coffee stains off your teeth.  Might work for your counter too.

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Hydrogen peroxide might work.  Mr. Clean Magic Eraser (if you can buy).

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I tried the oxy-action stuff on the problem zones, no use.

 

I'm toying with trying paint on the end section by the sink where the staining is bad, before giving up and getting it replaced. Any ideas of what kind of suitable primer and paint that would be available here I might try? Ideally would do a bit of arty blending to produce a sort of cloudy charcoal grey!

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We have one of these, https://www.dm.de/dr-beckmann-putzstein-p4008455026015.html. Not expensive and it lasts forever. Can't say if it will work for you, but hasn't failed us yet. Similarly this: https://www.dr-beckmann.de/unsere-produkte/detail/obst-getraenke Although it is for clothing, it may work on a countertop. My understanding is that these little vials for different stains are just different concentrations of their cleaner. 

 

Mind that changing the pH of a substance (stain) can also alter its ability to be removed. Tea stains shouldn't be complicated, so that may be the case, or it's not tea? 

 

Point being I'd avoid strong cleaners if you're not certain. Case in point... Gall soap for laundry often works well  -- except I notice it 'replaced' certain simple stains (olive/cooking oil) into lovely dark reddish-brown blotches. Some sort of enzyme reaction I guess. One of my t-shirts, wife's blouse, and a few tea towels now look very suspicious, and even bleach doesn't seem to get these out... A regular wash or two probably would've got the oil out, now it's permanent. Lesson learned.

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Well, the Putzstein won't break the bank and can be used elsewhere if it doesn't work, thanks!

I suspect I have tried so many methods on the stains that they are probably now chemically bound in to the surface!

 

 

 

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Try something acidic if the baking soda didn't work. Bathroom cleaner with antikalk properties is acidic enough for example. Some components of organic matter are soluble in acids, other components are soluble in bases (like worked for your beetroot). Plant leaf stains (overflow from watering) go away with acid. Unless your counter is marble, which will dissolve in acid!!!! Try a small patch first.

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On 8.4.2021, 19:13:14, Dembo said:

Any other suggestions?

 

Fablon.

 

Not a recommendation, but an option (really crappy, granted).

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5 hours ago, Feierabend said:

before giving up and getting it replaced

 

are you moving any time soon?  In your place, I would do what I can to make it look nice for myself but wouldn't resort to actually replacing the thing until it's time to move.  That way, the next time you eff up the surface, you won't have to buy another new one again ;) 

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No immediate plans for moving though would like to downsize eventually. I'd just like to have it looking nice for me; it was so smart when it was new only about 3 years ago! Am just fearful of doing a botched job, as I tend to be impatient! Have managed to do small items of softwood furniture acceptably, but this material seems so different ...

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If you can get hold of it, a product called "Barkeeper's Friend" is amazing. I often have stains from tea on our pale laminated kitchen surfaces and this removes them without damaging the surface.

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22 hours ago, LeonG said:

 

Try toothpaste.  It's supposed to get tea / coffee stains off your teeth.  Might work for your counter too.

 

I can confirm that toothpaste works neither on the counter nor on my teeth for removing tea stains.

 

21 hours ago, catjones said:

Hydrogen peroxide might work.  Mr. Clean Magic Eraser (if you can buy).

 

I've ordered a Magic Eraser to try. Not really sure what it is - seems to be a fancy sponge. Same goes for the cleaning stone. "Something acidic" sounds like it might work; white vinegar gets recommended as an alternative to baking soda. And it seems you can buy "Barkeeper's friend" on Amazon so maybe I'll give that a try.

 

Thanks for suggestions.

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You'll like Barkeeper's Friend for a lot of cleaning situations even if it doesn't work on your countertop.

I use the magic erasers very often. They are great for under kitchen cabinets and many other things. No problem on countertops but they can scratch some things like painted doors, etc. I always test first.

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10 hours ago, Dembo said:

I can confirm that toothpaste works neither on the counter nor on my teeth for removing tea stains.

 

You need something more abrasive than your present toothpaste then. Possibly a harder toothbrush? Have you tried bicarbonate of soda?

 

For the kitchen surface have you tried Cif / Jif? It tends to do the job where other products fail because it is fairly abrasive. Never tried it on my teeth though.

 

You could also try a drop of oil first, just in case the gunk happens to be lipo-soluble.

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