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Moving to Stuttgart, big mistake, boring ?

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well.... OP already found his/her answer (I believe even before starting this thread) and just needed some reassurance from the crowd before actually saying "no" to a good job offer.

 

That's an OK way to live your life - discussing major life decisions with random strangers on a forum - but I wouldn't recommend it.

 

One study interviewed people on their death beds, asking them what they regret about their life. Interesting enough most of those people did not regret anything they had done, but several things they had not done. (Like not having taken that job offer in Stuttgart).

 

I don't know what kind of job OP does, but nowadays a lot of jobs can be done remotely (or at least partially remotely). So, you could live in Berlin and work for a company in Stuttgart. 

 

My sister moved from Munich to Stuttgart for a job 30 years ago. She is still there. I visited about 10 times total, on various occasions. It was not boring. The only thing I didn't like about Stuttgart is the location smack dab in the bottom of a bucket - the air is terrible some days.  

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42 minutes ago, karin_brenig said:

well... OP already found his/her answer (I believe even before starting this thread) and just needed some reassurance from the crowd before actually saying "no" to a good job offer.

 

That's an OK way to live your life - discussing major life decisions with random strangers on a forum - but I wouldn't recommend it.

 

One study interviewed people on their death beds, asking them what they regret about their life. Interesting enough most of those people did not regret anything they had done, but several things they had not done. (Like not having taken that job offer in Stuttgart).

 

I don't know what kind of job OP does, but nowadays a lot of jobs can be done remotely (or at least partially remotely). So, you could live in Berlin and work for a company in Stuttgart. 

 

My sister moved from Munich to Stuttgart for a job 30 years ago. She is still there. I visited about 10 times total, on various occasions. It was not boring. The only thing I didn't like about Stuttgart is the location smack dab in the bottom of a bucket - the air is terrible some days.  

 

All that, that you wrote, sums it up pretty well. Are you a psychologist?

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1 hour ago, karin_brenig said:

well... OP already found his/her answer (I believe even before starting this thread) and just needed some reassurance from the crowd before actually saying "no" to a good job offer.

 

That's an OK way to live your life - discussing major life decisions with random strangers on a forum - but I wouldn't recommend it.

 

One study interviewed people on their death beds, asking them what they regret about their life. Interesting enough most of those people did not regret anything they had done, but several things they had not done. (Like not having taken that job offer in Stuttgart).

 

I don't know what kind of job OP does, but nowadays a lot of jobs can be done remotely (or at least partially remotely). So, you could live in Berlin and work for a company in Stuttgart. 

 

My sister moved from Munich to Stuttgart for a job 30 years ago. She is still there. I visited about 10 times total, on various occasions. It was not boring. The only thing I didn't like about Stuttgart is the location smack dab in the bottom of a bucket - the air is terrible some days.  

 

I disagree with this common idea "you regret things you had not done". Some things are better NOT to be done.

I don't need to put my hand on a fire to know that it hurts...

 

I did a similar move years ago, from a vibrant international city in an English-speaking country, to a middle-sized city in the middle of Germany (not far from Stuttgart), for career reasons. I ended up being stuck there for 3 years, and I still regret, almost 10 years later, to have wasted 3 years of my young life there.

 

I also don't believe in the "you can always go back to Berlin" idea...after you made all the effort to move, you won't move back soon, even if you don't like the job. And human beings tend to stick to suboptimal situations (e.g. toxic relationships), hoping that they improve, rather than make a move.

Plus it's bad for the resume to have a short stint.

You'll be stuck there for years...

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And let’s not kid ourselves, Stuttgart is dreadful. Perfectly fine for people who hate having social lives and/or adore driving to the woods to walk and point at birds, but my god what a boring little place it is. If you love Berlin, leave Stuttgart to the hobbits. Everyone wins.

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I lived in Stuttgart from ‘94 to 2004, then Munich from 2004 to 2014 and have been in Berlin since 2014. All moves were job related. I actually enjoyed my time in Stuttgart (I lived in Böblingen and worked in the city). However, it took me about two years to make any real friends (they say the Schwaben are slow to warm to someone from the outside), but they are now still some of my best friends today and we had really good times together. I also enjoy hiking, skiing and motorcycle riding, so the surrounding countryside was ideal for my purposes. That said, it is more of a sleepy provincial town, money/materialism seem to be very important to some and much of the city is really quite ugly and staid.

 

Munich was great and I love the city, probably my favorite city along with Prague.

 

Berlin is definitely the polar opposite. It is indeed edgy and more international. I have a love/hate relationship with Germany’s capital as I definitely appreciate cleanliness, efficiency and law and order and a lot of this is lacking here. However, it’s a big city and you can pick and choose how and where you live. For instance, in my part of town it’s a lot like Schwabing in Munich, which was what I was looking for when I bought a place four years ago. Public transit is very good here too, albeit very scuzzy compared to Stuttgart and Munich, and there is quite a cultural offering to be had.

 

A former colleague worked in Berlin for about two and half years before joining the competition in Stuttgart and thereby essentially doubled his salary overnight. However, the novelty of the new city soon wore off for him and he longed to come back. Then in January of this year he got his firm to transfer him to the Berlin branch with his Stuttgart salary. He has no regrets leaving. He also said that downtown Stuttgart has recently been taken over by the “Party- und Eventszene” and become rather seedy.

 

From what the OP has written, I would advise against him relocating to Stuttgart unless the job opportunity is just too good to turn down.

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2 hours ago, Contourt said:

 

All that, that you wrote, sums it up pretty well. Are you a psychologist?

no, I am a programmer (dealing with users has a lot to do with psychology).

 

My mother was a psychologist, though - and I was one of her favorite guinea pigs (not good, when you feel like you're being tested and observed 24/7) 

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15 minutes ago, karin_brenig said:

no, I am a programmer (dealing with users has a lot to do with psychology).

I thought that was more true for the support folks.

 

I spent the last just short of 20 years of my working life in Support Services ending up in Global Hardware Support with Sun Microsystems / Oracle.

True to one manager's words of wisdom: "If you are not directly supporting customers you'd better be supporting those who do".  Which I did.

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2 hours ago, Ralf said:

I lived in Stuttgart from ‘94 to 2004, then Munich from 2004 to 2014 and have been in Berlin since 2014. All moves were job related. I actually enjoyed my time in Stuttgart (I lived in Böblingen and worked in the city). However, it took me about two years to make any real friends (they say the Schwaben are slow to warm to someone from the outside), but they are now still some of my best friends today and we had really good times together. I also enjoy hiking, skiing and motorcycle riding, so the surrounding countryside was ideal for my purposes. That said, it is more of a sleepy provincial town, money/materialism seem to be very important to some and much of the city is really quite ugly and staid.

 

 

 

Munich was great and I love the city, probably my favorite city along with Prague.

 

 

 

Berlin is definitely the polar opposite. It is indeed edgy and more international. I have a love/hate relationship with Germany’s capital as I definitely appreciate cleanliness, efficiency and law and order and a lot of this is lacking here. However, it’s a big city and you can pick and choose how and where you live. For instance, in my part of town it’s a lot like Schwabing in Munich, which was what I was looking for when I bought a place four years ago. Public transit is very good here too, albeit very scuzzy compared to Stuttgart and Munich, and there is quite a cultural offering to be had.

 

 

 

A former colleague worked in Berlin for about two and half years before joining the competition in Stuttgart and thereby essentially doubled his salary overnight. However, the novelty of the new city soon wore off for him and he longed to come back. Then in January of this year he got his firm to transfer him to the Berlin branch with his Stuttgart salary. He has no regrets leaving. He also said that downtown Stuttgart has recently been taken over by the “Party- und Eventszene” and become rather seedy.

 

 

 

From what the OP has written, I would advise against him relocating to Stuttgart unless the job opportunity is just too good to turn down.

 

wow, great answer. I had similar situations in my life too where I lived and worked in cities of other European countries, which were rather on the quiet side. I hated it. I managed to break away two times rather quickly without having a backup plan and this damaged my CV irreparably.

I have been characterized as indecisive and undependable. Berlin, as great as it may seem, offers good job opportunities but to too manly people. Finding a good opportunity in Stuttgart to reignite my skills and my "career" seems the most ideal thing right now.

At the same time, I have to confront the same situation. Going to a, for me, "dead-boring town". A situation that resembles two attempts I've done in the past, in which I acted the same way.

In a way, I didn't come here to ask why it's boring there, that's a fact. Some, but not all, of my friends found out what I am up to and warned me not to go there.

I came here to reassure myself that it's indeed a bad move. But it's so contradictory because at the same time it saves my career and as a result my financial situation as well.

I wouldn't totally rely on answers given on a forum but your experiences here help me a bit towards decision-making.

 

 

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2 hours ago, UpToWick said:

 

I disagree with this common idea "you regret things you had not done". Some things are better NOT to be done.

 

 

I did a similar move years ago.... and I still regret, almost 10 years later, to have wasted 3 years of my young life there.

 

I also don't believe in the "you can always go back to Berlin" idea...after you made all the effort to move, you won't move back soon, even if you don't like the job.

You'll be stuck there for years...

 

Well said. Really! Decisions, Decisions. That's life. You never know where it will get you to.

But it's true about regretting things you decided not to do. It happens.

well...

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1 hour ago, Contourt said:

But it's true about regretting things you decided not to do. It happens.

 

Reminds me of:

Quote

"Grab a chance and you won't be sorry for a might have been." Commander Ted Walker, RN.

 

from Arthur Ransome's We Didn't Mean to Go to Sea

 

Have the entire series up in the loft...

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7 hours ago, klingklang77 said:

 

Reutlingen? 

 

I was os surprised when I visited Tübingen a few years ago for the chocolate fest. There was a Dunkin’ Donuts in the old town! 

 

And Frankfurt is a nice place to live. I come from NY originally, so the “crime” in Frankfurt is like nothing to me. It also does have a good nightlife. OP this might be something for you to consider. 


 

The Dunkin’ didn’t last long.  Last time I was there, it was closed down.  

 

We lived in Pfäffingen, which is about seven kilometers west.  
 

We now live in a suburb of Wiesbaden.

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8 hours ago, Contourt said:

Thanks for the tip. I speak German and it took me a while to learn the language. In Berlin, I still have a problem with their accent. I expect Hochdeutsch or nothing. Any weird accent or dialect and it sounds Chinese in my ears. 

 

The language thing is somewhat exaggerated. People in shops or doctors or whatever don't speak to you in Schwäbisch for the main reason that if they did half the population wouldn't understand. I overhear some people speaking Schwäibisch-y (the main thing is they don't pronounce the Ns at the end of words and say Das isht, du bisht etc.), but as always with dialects there's no standard and basically every village has its own version. But I've also heard native Berliners and thought "is that German?".

 

7 hours ago, Contourt said:

[Berin is] Paradice for driving with the bicycle, the streets are always flat.

You won't have that problem here.

 

 

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Small chance your new employer might see this post...;)

 

If its a contract position, then 6 months to a year somewhere you're not sure of is less stressful as you know there is going to be an end  - and you can keep your existing pad in Berlin.

 

Moving somewhere you're might to be stuck for years is a bit risky if you're already having doubts.  

 

Depends if you can afford to wait, or whether you have to take it.

Good luck.

 

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Here's my take on Stuttgart, I've been here for 10 years now:

 

I still don't love it.

 

It still hasn't grown on me.

 

It is in my opinion a compromise location, not a dream destination.  You're here because it makes sense, not because you always wanted to be here.

 

It's fine.  It's better than Mannheim.   Not better than Heidelberg, or Tübingen, or Freiburg, or Ulm or Schwäbisch Gmünd...maybe not even better than Heilbronn - and that's just in BW.  Berlin?  no contest - stay there!

 

 

 

  

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I went to a bar once in Stuttgart. Everyone was a male who worked in the automotive industry. I've been to Stuttgart a lot and I don't think it's a bad as the reputation, but that said, I'd like to post a simple, direct question: Do you like Germany? Or do you like Berlin, despite it being located in Germany? From your posts I got the feeling of the latter. If you don't like/love German culture, you will not be very happy in Stuttgart. I think that's the question you should ask yourself.

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10 hours ago, mainzigartig said:

I went to a bar once in Stuttgart. Everyone was a male who worked in the automotive industry. I've been to Stuttgart a lot and I don't think it's a bad as the reputation, but that said, I'd like to post a simple, direct question: Do you like Germany? Or do you like Berlin, despite it being located in Germany? From your posts I got the feeling of the latter. If you don't like/love German culture, you will not be very happy in Stuttgart. I think that's the question you should ask yourself.

To paraphrase Brecht: "The best thing in Stuttgart is the train to Munich."

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Congratulations, you are the winner of a weekend for two in Stuttgart!

 

What's second prize?

 

The whole week!

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On 29/03/2021, 12:12:28, Contourt said:

I asked why and she said that it's just some language versions from uneducated monkeys back then who thought it's right to bend the language to its death.

 

If you're not very liberally paraphrasing, I feel sorry for you that you've been taught by whoever said something so clueless. A German teacher, at that? Yikes.  

 

On 27/03/2021, 11:05:57, Contourt said:

This is how I found this position, through Vernetzung, and it's a good one. But can I waste three years of my life at the so-called cemetery like Stuttgart?

 

lol, I think you should take a big pinch of salt with whoever is telling you such ridiculous things. Stutgart is a major city, there's lots going on. It is certainly more bourgeois and straightlaced than Berlin, not that Berlin has any shortage of relocated bourgeois Schwaben. 

 

As others have said, it depends what you want. If you set impossible standards, it's kind of hard to beat them. Personally (I was born and raised in a large city, too) the idea of living in Berlin is totally unappealing to me, though I enjoy a visit now and then. I do miss the international flair of big cities, but IME, nowhere in Germany, not Berlin, Frankfurt or Munich, compares for me. And obviously Berlin offers more extremes, if all-night party life, 24 hour beer and blow is what you're after.

 

I've only been to Stuttgart a few times, but I liked it enough doing touristy things. My brother-in-law lives there (or just outside, as he also complains about the bucket of dirty air that the city is) and likes it, and he's deeply into goth and metal stuff. There's much more of a scene for that than where he comes from, so for him it's an improvement. He otherwise has an office job at a big well-known German company, earrings, dragon rings and long black hair and all. And he's received promotions, so he's not totally outcast. Don't know if I'd move to Stuttgart either though, it might actually be too big and industrial for my taste. But, I also like walking around the woods pointing at birds.


I don't know where you are in your career, but I think it is a lot easier to flex your wings and make a name for yourself outside of Berlin. And later transfer back somehow if you want, or can. Too many people want to make it in Berlin, fair enough, but then find themselves among thousands competing for the lowest rungs on the ladder. TTers living there may disagree, but for me it's a much overrated city. 

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Personally, I prefer Hamburg to Berlin.  But I've only gone to either city once each, and we had my mother-in-law with us when we went to Berlin.  I love my MIL, but we didn't get to see or do as much as we might have.

 

There are things I miss about living in BW.  Our dentist is still down there and we are way overdue for a checkup.  I'm looking forward to booking a weekend at the fabulous Waldhotel in Degerloch, getting a cleaning, and hitting a few favorite restaurants.

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I lived in Bonn for several years, much smaller than Stuttgart, that was exciting enough. There are lots of Staeffele in Stuttgart, stairs up and down the hills, not so long ago they were for access to vineyards, great for exploring.

 

Really there is not so much difference between big towns in Germany as to quality of life, opportunities. Except perhaps that many towns in the East are tidier than those in the West.

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