How long should I remain with my employer after I get my permanent residence?

17 posts in this topic

I am in a strange situation, and don't know where else to ask.

 

I came to Germany on a limited 2-year Blue Card with a 2-year employment contract.

I have applied for my Niederlassungserlaubnis, and expect to receive it soon. Once I have this permanent residence, I no longer need my employment, but I had to sign an extension of my contract in order to apply for it.

 

How long should I continue working for my company after receiving my residence permit so that I am not being rude? I am not leaving them for a different employer, but essentially entering retirement (very) early.

 

If this topic is not appropriate here, please just let me know and I will delete it.

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I was part of a downsizing shortly after receiving mine going to alg1 there was no issue. What you will need to do is comply with the terms of your ontract extension so you dont have legal issues with that.. i e proper termination process.  You also will need to arrange insurance etc. If you have any dependents on family visas with you when you need to extend those you will need the right income etc to get those extended.

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@lunasuenos: Thank you for the reply. I have everything covered as far as the legal requirements and giving notice, etc.

I am more unsure about the social courtesy between myself and my employer, and would like to not "burn the bridge" if possible. Is there a standard acceptable period that I can wait to maintain the relationship, or is it entirely dependent on the company?

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I think it totally depends on your view and understanding of your company. Dont believe ther is a one size fits all approach  on this as long as you follow your noticification period for leaving that part is not really up for interpretation, but maybe someone will have better input. 

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Much appreciated!

I only ask because the 3-month notice period seems especially long to me, but is taken as standard here.

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On 3/15/2021, 12:05:17, MadManEarle said:

I am in a strange situation, and don't know where else to ask.

 

I came to Germany on a limited 2-year Blue Card with a 2-year employment contract.

I have applied for my Niederlassungserlaubnis, and expect to receive it soon. Once I have this permanent residence, I no longer need my employment, but I had to sign an extension of my contract in order to apply for it.

 

How long should I continue working for my company after receiving my residence permit so that I am not being rude? I am not leaving them for a different employer, but essentially entering retirement (very) early.

 

If this topic is not appropriate here, please just let me know and I will delete it.

I'd say you can choose that based on how you feel.

 

The only downside I could see would be a future employer looking at this situation and wondering why you left the company so soon and maybe also so soon after getting your leave to stay.

As you are just going in to retirement then that isn't a problem. Should you decide to go for another job later, have a reason ready in case they ask why you retired son after getting your permanent residence. If you can answer that well enough it shouldn't be a problem.

 

As says above, just work your notice period. 3 months isn't a standard, but it isn't that long either. I've been held to 3 month from the end of the current quarter year and I've known people (who granted earned a lot) held to a year. 

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On 15/03/2021, 12:50:27, MadManEarle said:

@lunasuenos: Thank you for the reply. I have everything covered as far as the legal requirements and giving notice, etc.

I am more unsure about the social courtesy between myself and my employer, and would like to not "burn the bridge" if possible. Is there a standard acceptable period that I can wait to maintain the relationship, or is it entirely dependent on the company?

 

Thanks for that contract so I could get permanent residency, but I am outta here baby! 

 

Perhaps you can inquire about a Aufhebungsvertrag to leave earlier on mutual grounds. This will obviously depend on your employer and you. But, if you are confident financially and of never working again, well, hey, do what you want. I would consider how the company had treated me. If managers and colleagues were fair and cooperative and everything, then 3 months is no biggie. You have the rest of your young life.  If they weren't so nice, proceed as you wish. 

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You may consider being open and telling your employer that you want to retire but will stay until they found someone else to take over your job.

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Thank you all for the responses. I really do appreciate them.

I think maybe I was not as clear as I wanted in the earlier post.

The extension I have signed is "unlimited", and I will give a minimum 3-month notice before leaving.

 

16 hours ago, cb6dba said:

As says above, just work your notice period. 3 months isn't a standard, but it isn't that long either. I've been held to 3 month from the end of the current quarter year and I've known people (who granted earned a lot) held to a year. 

Very interesting, thank you. I was led to believe that 3 months was the minimum allowable period for notice, but had no idea that they also were so long.

 

15 hours ago, alderhill said:

Thanks for that contract so I could get permanent residency, but I am outta here baby! 

I would like to avoid exactly this, if possible. So far, I have been treated well enough, and I want to also treat them respectfully. But I see no reason to continue working indefinitely.

 

15 hours ago, alderhill said:

You have the rest of your young life.

This seems like a strange point to make. Does my age change how I should act toward my employer?

 

3 hours ago, jeba said:

You may consider being open and telling your employer that you want to retire but will stay until they found someone else to take over your job.

This is probably what I will do. I just wanted to find out if bringing up the subject would sour the relationship before I did anything. I would rather make my social faux pas on this discussion board than with my boss. ;)

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9 minutes ago, MadManEarle said:

Very interesting, thank you. I was led to believe that 3 months was the minimum allowable period for notice, but had no idea that they also were so long.

To clarify, there is a legal minimum if none is defined in our contract.

What does your contract say?

 

 

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14 minutes ago, MadManEarle said:

I just wanted to find out if bringing up the subject would sour the relationship before I did anything.

 

Tread very carefully. The teutons do seem to have a high regard for loyalty. IME. Generally speaking I think this is reflected in the lack of fluidity in their relationships compared to your average Anglo-Saxon, who can appear flighty or superficial by comparison. I have myself been surprised at the response of colleagues when they heard I was leaving work places. The attitude was not - ah, you're moving on to greater things (positive), good luck, but rather TRAITOR! you are abandoning us!

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27 minutes ago, cb6dba said:

To clarify, there is a legal minimum if none is defined in our contract.

What does your contract say?

My contract is 3 months, so I have been planning around that.

 

24 minutes ago, optimista said:

Tread very carefully. The teutons do seem to have a high regard for loyalty. IME. Generally speaking I think this is reflected in the lack of fluidity in their relationships compared to your average Anglo-Saxon, who can appear flighty or superficial by comparison. I have myself been surprised at the response of colleagues when they heard I was leaving work places. The attitude was not - ah, you're moving on to greater things (positive), good luck, but rather TRAITOR you are abandoning us!

Yes, I have noticed the same tendencies. Much more collectivist than I am used to, which has been a hard adjustment sometimes.

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1 hour ago, MadManEarle said:

This seems like a strange point to make. Does my age change how I should act toward my employer?

 

You misunderstood. If you are young enough, what is 3 months to help out your lovely colleagues make an orderly transition? You know, to not burn bridges. I don't know how old you are, but say you have the next 60-70-80 years to be retired. What's the rush?

 

I think 3 months is quite fair and reasonable, and it'll go by quick. But if you have very itchy feet, you can try as I suggested to agree on an Aufhebungsvertrag which allows you to get out early. If you're 58, I can understand if you are looking at life's clock more anxiously and just want to get outta there. Fair enough.

 

I think there is no way around them being surprised that you leave so soon after signing a permanent/indefinite contract. At the end of the day though, it's none of their business and they will probably survive. Likewise, if you are financially independent and don't need a reference or anything, then do as you wish. Are you planning to meet them ever again after leaving? Is it a family business? (Your family??) 

 

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10 minutes ago, alderhill said:

what is 3 months to help out your lovely colleagues make an orderly transition?

 

I don't think your colleagues will care later whether you stayed 3 months or 3 weeks.  6 months after you left nobody will remember that you put in a little more time there than you would have cared to.  Once you are gone, you are gone.  No matter when you leave something will be hanging or not done or was done wrong and since you are gone, it's easy to say things might have been different if you had done X or Y. 

 

it's business.  If they can't deal with people leaving, that's their problem.  As long as you don't need a reference...

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1 minute ago, DoubleDTown said:

 

I don't think your colleagues will care later whether you stayed 3 months or 3 weeks.  6 months after you left nobody will remember that you put in a little more time there than you would have cared to.  Once you are gone, you are gone.  No matter when you leave something will be hanging or not done or was done wrong and since you are gone, it's easy to say things might have been different if you had done X or Y. 

 

it's business.  If they can't deal with people leaving, that's their problem.  As long as you don't need a reference...

 

Yes, exactly. So if OP wants to leave, and can afford to... just do it!

 

To me I guess, 3 months is not that long so I wouldn't care. The only reason I'd stay in OP's case is to do my colleagues a solid and let them find my replacement in due time and not force extra work on them. (Just make sure the Niederlassungserlaubnis card is in our hand.) Savour the satisfaction of knowing it's your last 3 months of rat race, ever. Then enjoy your goodbye pretzels and Schorle and ciao.

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Ah, I think I see the misunderstanding now, alderhill.

 

I am not trying to rush out at all, but rather determine what a good period of time is to keep working with them specifically because I have just signed the indefinite contract. If the answer is 5 years, then I would have a hard time accepting that, but if the answer is simply give the 3 months notice, then everything is easy.

 

It is very understandable for them to be surprised. Without going too deeply into the details, I made some investments that turned out much better than I expected, and I am also a little bit surprised that I can retire already.

 

To answer your other question, I will have no dealings with this company once I leave. I have no incentive to hang around other than I want to show my appreciation by not putting them in a bad position.

 

15 minutes ago, DoubleDTown said:

As long as you don't need a reference...

Yes, the reference letter system is very strong. I will be glad to be out of it.

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