Relocating nearby to Munich

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Hi guys, I will try to be short. I have been living in Karlsruhe for almost 4 years and  now got a new role in Munich. Currently working remotely. My employer is not asking me to move, I actually can stay and work here as much as I wish. But I this city is small and I think it would be better to move to nearby Munich, because personally I see more opportunities in the future for myself, for my wife and for my children. At the moment neither me nor my wife speaks German and still have to rely on English :) My kids speak German really well :).  Now regarding relocation, I don't want to rent an apartment anymore, I want to buy a house. But I understand that the prices in Munich are simply unreasonable for me.  So I'm asking your suggestions, where nearby Munich is a good place to buy a house to settle with a family, while still being close enough to Munich, and still be available to use English to solve very similar life related things. We lover forests and nature, so we would like to settle near to forest if there are any nearby Munich. Thanks a lot for your time. 

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What’s reasonable for you and what are your expectations concerning the house are important factors in the equation. The towns to the south of Munich are perfect for Nature and forest lovers, but you’ll be hard pressed to find a proper  (detached, large garden, not in need of major renovations) house close to Munich for less than one and a half million. A row house can be had for less.

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23 minutes ago, Aralez said:

Hi guys, I will try to be short. I have been living in Karlsruhe for almost 4 years and  now got a new role in Munich. Currently working remotely. My employer is not asking me to move, I actually can stay and work here as much as I wish. But I this city is small and I think it would be better to move to nearby Munich, because personally I see more opportunities in the future for myself, for my wife and for my children. At the moment neither me nor my wife speaks German and still have to rely on English :) My kids speak German really well :).  Now regarding relocation, I don't want to rent an apartment anymore, I want to buy a house. But I understand that the prices in Munich are simply unreasonable for me.  So I'm asking your suggestions, where nearby Munich is a good place to buy a house to settle with a family, while still being close enough to Munich, and still be available to use English to solve very similar life related things. We lover forests and nature, so we would like to settle near to forest if there are any nearby Munich. Thanks a lot for your time. 

well, what you're asking for is challenging, but not impossible to attain.  

 

My husband and I bought a house (Doppelhaushälfte) in Kirchseeon last year. Ebersberger Forst (the largest forest in Bavaria) is in walking distance. We spend hours riding our bikes there. Keeping your distance from people during a pandemic is easy to do here. The only part of your wishlist that I'm not real sure about would be the language. People here do speak some English - but I wouldn't want to rely on it.

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1 hour ago, Aralez said:

Now regarding relocation, I don't want to rent an apartment anymore, I want to buy a house.

Why? Just rent. Makes no sense to buy a house in Munich. It's the biggest realstate bubble in the world and will eventually collapse. Wait till it does, then buy.

 

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But I understand that the prices in Munich are simply unreasonable for me.  So I'm asking your suggestions, where nearby Munich is a good place to buy a house to settle with a family, while still being close enough to Munich, and still be available to use English to solve very similar life related things. We lover forests and nature, so we would like to settle near to forest if there are any nearby Munich. Thanks a lot for your time. 

I have a friend that bought a new small row house for about 600.000€, about 40 minutes away from Munich. But it's a tiny village and definitely not english-friendly. Worst, these small villages are not foreign-friendly. And some not even German-friendly. Either your great granpas were born there or you don't belong.

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44 minutes ago, MikeMelga said:

Why? Just rent. Makes no sense to buy a house in Munich. It's the biggest realstate bubble in the world and will eventually collapse. Wait till it does, then buy.

 

I have a friend that bought a new small row house for about 600.000€, about 40 minutes away from Munich. But it's a tiny village and definitely not english-friendly. Worst, these small villages are not foreign-friendly. And some not even German-friendly. Either your great granpas were born there or you don't belong.

 

ok - I've heard that talk about "real-estate bubble" in Munich (and the surrounding areas) ever since I can remember. People talked about it when my parents built their house in Baldham, 1969. We all heard it, when my parents bought a house in Schwabing, 1979. I still heard it when I bought my first condo in Neuperlach, 1989. The same talk was going strong when I bought an investment property (or tax-savings apartment) close to the (then brand-new) MUC airport. Those voices were even louder last year, and compounded by stories about the effects of COVID-19 (which people thought would make the imaginary bubble burst) when my husband and I bought our (dream-come-true) house in Kirchseeon (26km outside of Munich) last year. 

 

Point being: while the price of real estate (in Munich or elsewhere) may fluctuate short-term, in the long run - since supply can't grow, but demand naturally will - real estate prices will always go up. We've had the discussion about "rent or buy" on this forum a couple of times - my opinion there is clear: whatever you're paying for rent would be better invested in ownership. Unless you know for a fact that you will not want to live in that location for more than 5 years.

 

About "tiny village" (Kirchseeon has a poplulation of about 7,000) being not "foreign-friendly" that could be the case, and it would be compounded by your inability (or lack of effort) to speak German. This part (in my experience) depends largely on your personal effort to integrate. There's a lot that you can do, if you want to "belong".   

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The Munich bubble and rent vs own have both been discussed to death on TT already. There is no right or wrong in either case but the right fighters just can't seem to give it up.

 

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2 hours ago, karin_brenig said:

About "tiny village" (Kirchseeon has a poplulation of about 7,000) being not "foreign-friendly" that could be the case, and it would be compounded by your inability (or lack of effort) to speak German. This part (in my experience) depends largely on your personal effort to integrate. There's a lot that you can do, if you want to "belong".   

I know a 70 year old northern German who has been living in a small town near Munich for 35 years and he told me the locals still don't accept them as one of theirs.

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2 hours ago, MikeMelga said:

I know a 70 year old northern German who has been living in a small town near Munich for 35 years and he told me the locals still don't accept them as one of theirs.

 

I can totally relate to that :) some people still call me (German born, dual national US/German, spent over 50 years in and around Munich, speak fluent Bavarian) "Saupreiß, amerikanischer" - doesn't mean I don't belong.

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15 minutes ago, karin_brenig said:

 

I can totally relate to that :) some people still call me (German born, dual national US/German, spent over 50 years in and around Munich, speak fluent Bavarian) "Saupreiß, amerikanischer" - doesn't mean I don't belong.

 

It's a shame that people who consider themselves supposedly even-tempered and educated can't behave in a less clearly bigoted way.

 

I'm from the US South and even we consider such open aggression as uncouth and for low-class and uneducated people or those with severe mental defect only.

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3 hours ago, MikeMelga said:

I know a 70 year old northern German who has been living in a small town near Munich for 35 years and he told me the locals still don't accept them as one of theirs.

 

I've heard that many times, but never really know what it means.  Do you get to sleep with them? Eat with them?  Do they get discounts?

Likewise, it would be interesting to hear the other side.  "There's this 70 year old who's been living here for 35 years and he just can't get along with anyone.  He's the town hermit."

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50 minutes ago, AlexTr said:

 

It's a shame that people who consider themselves supposedly even-tempered and educated can't behave in a less clearly bigoted way.

 

I'm from the US South and even we consider such open aggression as uncouth and for low-class and uneducated people or those with severe mental defect only.

 

no, it's a term of endearment ;) when somebody shouts at me "mei, Karin, oide Fischhaut ! Sag' wia geht's da, Saupreiß, amerikanischer ?" then I know here's home. Totally even-tempered, educated, and belonging right there. I agree, 35 years in a place is not enough - it'd have to be a life time.

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16 minutes ago, karin_brenig said:

 

no, it's a term of endearment ;) when somebody shouts at me "mei, Karin, oide Fischhaut ! Sag' wia geht's da, Saupreiß, amerikanischer ?" then I know here's home. Totally even-tempered, educated, and belonging right there. I agree, 35 years in a place is not enough - it'd have to be a life time.

 

Yeah, back when I was younger and didn't know better, I let other women call me bitch as a term of endearment. It wasn't. Still isn't. 

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I also think that the OP should initially rent a property - it would give him a chance to learn the language, and to decide for sure if he actually wants to be in the Munich area.

Also, by learning the language, and conversing with the locals, he is more likely to hear of potential properties before they go on the major listings.

 

As for the "property bubble" around Munich, just take a look at the property listings for Munich - a few years back there were still loads of flats to be had in the €200,000 range - now the cheaper properties are around €400,000.

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9 minutes ago, robinson100 said:

a few years back there were still loads of flats to be had in the €200,000 range - now the cheaper properties are around €400,000.

 

Maybe for 55 meters or less.

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12 hours ago, fraufruit said:

 

Maybe for 55 meters or less.

 

- point is, the price has doubled even to get onto the property ladder!

 

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23 hours ago, catjones said:

 

I've heard that many times, but never really know what it means.  Do you get to sleep with them? Eat with them?  Do they get discounts?

Likewise, it would be interesting to hear the other side.  "There's this 70 year old who's been living here for 35 years and he just can't get along with anyone.  He's the town hermit."

Not invited for parties, not invited to someone's home, and you feel the "bubbles".

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17 hours ago, MikeMelga said:

Not invited for parties, not invited to someone's home, and you feel the "bubbles".

 

Maybe it has to do as well with the amazing personality some people have and their refusal to integrate, because you know, integration is a two ways road.

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17 minutes ago, Krieg said:

 

Maybe it has to do as well with the amazing personality some people have and their refusal to integrate, because you know, integration is a two ways road.

Not in that case, he is a great guy, great social skills. It's pure "local shop for local people, we don't want no strangers here!" mindset.

I had a friend living in Landsberg (not that small!) where people would refuse to rent to a non German. And even when his company rented the apartment, the neighbours came in the first day to tell him that "this is Germany, only one family per apartment, you follow the laws here, and we want no noise!".

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4 hours ago, MikeMelga said:

I had a friend living in Landsberg (not that small!) where people would refuse to rent to a non German

 

There's always a story of some sort about some thing; that's why it becomes a story.

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