Sour dough bread making in Deutschland

11 posts in this topic

Has anyone made sourdough/yeast bread over here and if so could you recommend which flour type you used for the starter?

 

Have began a starter with 405 type and it’s getting some bubbles days into it, was curious if there was any one who had more experience on here. 

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I’ve read through the previous threads in regards to sour dough and many other bread related topics but can’t seem to see any specific flour types used regarding a starter.
 

Although I’m sure you can use most flour types. 

 

Curious to see if there are any bakers on here who make it regularly.
 

 

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I have a lievito madre that runs on wheat flour. I usually use 1050 but 405 will do as well - and a rye sourdough. I think the rye flour is 1150(?). My supermarket only has one kind.  I have only just started baking bread and got the dough from a friend,  but you can easily start your own.  I use the rye dough for any kind of bread - wheat, rye, spelt. There are some great German websites with recipes if you are interested.  

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I have two sourdough starters that always live in my fridge, a rye (1150) and a wheat (405). I've also done Dinkel (Spelt), but was not in love with it as a maintaining sour. Manitoba ("strong wheat") is good, but a waste as a starter for me - I prefer to add it in later. If you're really experimental, you can go with the ancient grains (z.B. Emmer, Kamut), but they're pricey, better for yeast breads. And DO NOT go gluten-free (duh).

The "trouble" with sourdough baking is that everyone tells you to refresh the hell out of your starter, which leads to lots of "discard". This being the case, it has sparked lots of "discard starter" blogs, most of which IMHO are bogus. And most of the finished products are hockey pucks (often disguised as pancakes).

If you're looking for recipes, Shipton Mills (UK) is reliable. King Arthur (US) ok, but my all-time site is:  https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/

This is one of the best breads that I've baked this year: https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2014/04/rye-bread-sunflower-seeds-sourdough/

I'm in Munich, so most of my flour comes from the Hofbräu-Kunstmühle in the city. They're the largest miller/provider of Italian-style 00 flour to the city, and they do conventional as well as Bio-qualität flours (not all milled on premesis though).  Monika Drax mills some of the best flours that I've ever worked with: https://www.drax-muehle.de/.

PM me if I can be of help, or if you just want to sourdo-chat... :)

 

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I´ve tried to start it with whole-grain flour. Didn´t work well.

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Supermarket Rye/Roggen. 1150

Not wholegrain. 

 

Just don't forget to spoon off some starter for next time. 

Cost me a week, that one.

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I tried it for the first time using Dinkel 630 flour. No problems at all and the starter has been going for almost a year. I bake and refresh at least once a week. 

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@jeba: I'm surprised that whole grain didn't work well, considering that before the end of the 19th century most all milled flour was whole grain.

It could also have been a question of the mill itself - some will mill the bran finer (so as to be indestinguishable), others not. Either way, I hope that this didn't put you off sours altogether. :o:)

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ok - this reminds me of my "adventures" as a German in the US, desperate for some "real" bread. I found out, that it's not the starter flour alone. Things can go wrong in other places too.

 

If your water is chlorinated (most tap water is), your results will be unpredictable. In the US I had good results with RO filtered water. Distilled water should be fine too. 

 

Another critical factor is the temperature. Good sourdough grows best around "body temperature". Find a toasty spot and wrap the jar in a thick towel.

 

 

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This is the video I was going from mainly because I want to see how good a bread I can make without fancy equipment.

 

I’ve also read that if you use tap water to let it sit out over night so if there are any impurities (like chlorine) they will evaporate out.

 

Going to keep the starter out at room temp and feed everyday for 7 days then use to bake. 
 

As I won’t be baking every week I will go from everyday feeding to refrigerating and feeding once a week after that. 

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