Would it make sense to first buy a "Grundstück" and then plan to have a house built?

31 posts in this topic

29 minutes ago, mtbiking said:

 

Yes, it is as you say, but on the other hand building a brand new house is expensive and in many cases a huge headache. Adding insult to injury, in southern bavaria plot prices are so high that the existence of a perfectly decent 20 years old house on it  doesn't make a big difference as you mostly pay for the plot. When I last bought some years ago the plot price was around 75% of  the total, and nowadays I see empty plots similar to mine in the neighbourhood being sold for what I paid for plot + house.

It's getting similar in Portugal! Several of my friends, reaching 40's, are building now and they found the same thing.

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6 minutes ago, MikeMelga said:

I thought the same, but he told me the guy was German and price was in line with others, although he could be lying there.

 

I've seen a couple colleagues of mine (Technical background, project leads, smart people) build successfully (with their fair share of problems, of course) and I could hear them talking to the contractor pratically daily for months. You need to keep on top of things and be ready to cut the contractor loose at any time. You have project experience, so you know the drill. Most people don't.

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In my colleagues case, it got to the point where he would schedule a visit and construction workers would be there, but if he had an unscheduled visit, nobody would be there. They were planting workers and pretending to work on it. But yeah, he probably did not take it too seriously.

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I know a few people that have done this and it sees to be a very variable experience to be honest.

 

One couple had their ground (bought along with other people) for over 2 years and before the basic building stuff started. That was having gone through contract problems with the architect, prices going up so people had to drop out etc. It's been a nightmare for them.

I guy I work with bought his land and the house went up quickly once it was organized. Granted it was a pre-fabricated house but the only issue he had is they didn't bother with the drainage system for the garden (the builders didn't). All had to be done later when the water started collecting and running on to his neigbours' gardens. 

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7 hours ago, mtbiking said:

building a brand new house is expensive and in many cases a huge headache.

 

Imagine building a custom car, but instead of going to a custom car builder, you hired a manager who subcontracted the design to one person, the garage from another, the bodywork to another, the interior to another, the brakes....you get the point.  The likelihood of that car being finished on time and drivable is almost nil, yet that is what's done on many home projects....and with detailed blueprints!

I use the 80-20 rule and spend 80% of my time doing research and 20% doing the project.  While it's not perfect, the opposite never fails to fail.

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About 40 years ago I discussed this subject with locals. They convinced me the best and cheapest  way to build a house was to buy a piece of land in the area then go 6 months long every week to a local pub. There you meet local building  workers and others who have contact to employees in suppliers of building materials., transport drivers and others who like to work evenings and weekends and earn a few extra Euros.

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I never did figure out why someone buys and 'old' house and demolishes it and then puts in it's place a 'new' house. Is it really so hard to bring an older house up to a more modern standard?

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1 hour ago, scook17 said:

Is it really so hard to bring an older house up to a more modern standard?

Yes!

 

 

You take over all the existing problems and don't start having any advantages until you've paid for all the fixes.

 

On top of that, you only get the layout of the existing building.

 

If you want more bedrooms, a long dining room, full length windows etc,etc, then you must compromise with the existing floor plan.

 

A new building can incorporate all your architectural designs and whims.

 

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1 hour ago, HH_Sailor said:

Yes!

 

 

You take over all the existing problems and don't start having any advantages until you've paid for all the fixes.

 

On top of that, you only get the layout of the existing building.

 

If you want more bedrooms, a long dining room, full length windows etc,etc, then you must compromise with the existing floor plan.

 

A new building can incorporate all your architectural designs and whims.

 

Agree! Think of the old plumbing, electric wires etc!

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FFS.. when will you lot take off your "I dont have a fucking clue" hats and look at the other options?

 

I bought an old farm house...  Looked at it and saw potential... 

 

I turned it from an old farm house to a very comfortable old place mega property that could be split into 2 separate places... 

 

Gotta fuckin laugh at Miges old plumbing comment and electric wires!!   What else would wire be used for apart from cheese cutting?

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17 hours ago, SpiderPig said:

I bought an old farm house...  Looked at it and saw potential... 

I turned it from an old farm house to a very comfortable old place mega property that could be split into 2 separate places... 

 

@SpiderPig well good for you!

I've seen some of your blog/pics and you've made a grand job of it and I sincerely hope you'll

all be happy living there.

 

I can't lay bricks or tiles. I don't enjoy decorating. I wouldn't know where to start removing and replacing

windows. Lets leave aside gas/water/elec fittings. I can't spot illegal or dangerous fittings

that would cause trouble once papered/tiled over. 

 

I need to pay a professional team to do that for me.

That's what I based my opinion on - "build new, don't renovate"

 

I've seen how much tradespeople charge to fit stuff (I can read their offers).

I've been bitten by their offers when it turns out they need to do something additional...

Those "changes" to the original offer are always super expensive.

 

I do have a architect in the family - and the message from that corner is a very definate 

    "Build new - don't renovate"  unless : 

  • you seriously know what you're doing (as in: you're in the trade)
  • you've got time on your hands or are happy living on a building site, for months, as work progresses
  • you like surprises (what is behind that wall?)
  • there are reasons (fell in love with the building, listed and can't be replaced, or whatever)

 

Shock-horror stories abound in Germany and are made into TV series

See RTL2   / YouTube

https://www.rtl2.de/sendungen/die-bauretter

https://www.rtl2.de/sendungen/zuhause-im-glueck-unser-einzug-in-ein-neues-leben

 

 

 

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