How long can I stay in Germany?

68 posts in this topic

48 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

How could you suggest such a thing?

We got married so I could get on his insurance.聽:D

Several of my (then future) wife's student colleagues thought we had to marry

to prevent me being deported.

Sings... "what's love got to do with it"

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1 hour ago, HH_Sailor said:

Sings... "what's love got to do with it"

There seems to be a long list of appropriate Lieder...

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38 minutes ago, john g. said:

But you still need practice in the wooing phase馃憤馃徏馃檹馃徎

I had to ask mine 3 times.聽 That was 32 years ago...

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On 1/16/2021, 5:09:39, fraufruit said:

How could you suggest such a thing?

We got married so I could get on his insurance.聽:D

Just for information!馃槀

You could safely get divorced and stay publicly insured ( though with your own public contract and payments.)

This has been a public service announcement!馃槀馃槀

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On 1/16/2021, 3:51:48, Bobbyhall said:

Quite curious as to how many people have gotten married to stay in Germany now.聽

Surely there has to be some sort of partner visa, like in Australia.

Fair enough. But then, what's the difference between married and partner?

If the "partner status" is recognized legally in a society, why don't we simply call it marriage?

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4 minutes ago, Gambatte said:

Fair enough. But then, what's the difference between married and partner?

If the "partner status" is recognized legally in a society, why don't we simply call it marriage?

Because German law doesn't recognize domestic partnerships, except in the case of homosexual couples and when calculating welfare entitlements.

Under German law, no matter how long you cohabitate with your partner, you are not afforded the same rights (from immigration to taxation) as married couples. If you want to enjoy those rights, you have to get legally married.

Hence the chorus of voices in this thread suggesting that avenue as a potential solution.

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3 minutes ago, El Jeffo said:

Because German law doesn't recognize domestic partnerships, except in the case of homosexual couples and when calculating welfare entitlements.

Under German law, no matter how long you cohabitate with your partner, you are not afforded the same rights (from immigration to taxation) as married couples.

Fine, but then you could say the concept of "legal partnership" is already present in Germany, it's called "marriage".

Wrong?

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6 minutes ago, Gambatte said:

Fine, but then you could say the concept of "legal partnership" is already present in Germany, it's called "marriage".

Wrong?

Yes, wrong.

German family law is still deeply rooted in the 19th century definitions. A marriage is a marriage and a partnership is a simple matter of cohabitation. The latter affords absolutely no additional civil rights whatsoever.

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Of course I agree "cohabitation" is not equivalent to marriage. But, in the countries where聽the concept of聽 "legal partnership" exist and is recognized by the state, what is the difference there between marriage and legal partnership? Why the heck should a country/state bother to establish the concept of "legal partnership" at all? I think this already exists, it's just called marriage.

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Say you have an accident and they want to to turn of the life support machine.

If you are married, your partner聽makes the call.

As far as I was told, if you are not married, they will call your next of kin. Which cold be (for us)聽in another country聽with a language barrier.聽

If you die unmarried, I'm not sure your partner聽gets to inherit your part of the house, I was also told that next of kin get it.

All this could be wrong mind.

As I say in all things legal, don't assume it works like you think it does, even if what you think is logical.

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12 minutes ago, El Jeffo said:

A marriage is a marriage

OK

12 minutes ago, El Jeffo said:

a partnership is a simple matter of cohabitation.

But cohabitation is not partnership.聽

12 minutes ago, El Jeffo said:

The latter affords absolutely no additional civil rights whatsoever.

Agree.

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15 minutes ago, cb6dba said:

Say you have an accident and they want to to turn of the life support machine.

If you are married, your partner聽makes the call.

As far as I was told, if you are not married, they will call your next of kin. Which cold be (for us)聽in another country聽with a language barrier.聽

If you die unmarried, I'm not sure your partner聽gets to inherit your part of the house, I was also told that next of kin get it.

All this could be wrong mind.

As I say in all things legal, don't assume it works like you think it does, even if what you think is logical.

Fair enough. But throughout your life, before the accident or death, you are always in control, whom/when to make your family member.

If you want another person to inherit your house or whatever, you simply marry this person. What's missing?

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28 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

A will.

Yes, but then the inheritance tax will be a bitch - the exemption amount for spouses is 鈧500,000. The exemption amount for random people is just 鈧20,000.

If you inherit a house worth 鈧1,000,000 from a total stranger, you'll be expected to pay tax on 鈧980,000 of it.

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But you know this beforehand and can control it. If you want a specific person聽 to inherit your house and not to pay more rather than less tax, you marry the person.

What's missing?

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