How long can I stay in Germany?

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Hey new here and was looking for any information to my situation which could be helpful. I've had a look online at both UK and German government websites but still unclear on the stance of this because of Brexit.

 

I came to visit my girlfriend who lives in Hannover before Christmas and due to the UK going into lockdown my return flight was cancelled. The shop I work in, in the UK is now closed so I can't go back to work so I decided to stay here in Hannover.

 

I am looking to move here to live with her eventually but due to COVID it has obviously made things more difficult.

 

My question is: Legally how long can I stay here? I do not want to have a mark against my name which could make my moving here in the future more of a hassle. As I came here in December 2020 I did not need a visa to enter Germany. I seen on the gov website if I plan to stay for more than 90 days to apply for a visa within 14 days of being here which has now passed... It is looking perhaps more likely im going to be here for longer as if I fly to the UK now, I probably wont get to see my girlfriend until flights resume again?

 

Any help or information would be greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks

BH

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...well... I'm sorry for your situation, but for your question about "90 days visa-free stay", you read this correctly:

if you plan on staying longer than 90 days... you did not plan to stay longer. Your flight was cancelled, your initial plan to return to the UK after Christmas was cancelled by the circumstances.

 

You are just now readjusting your plans. Maybe you plan on staying longer than 90 days. Or maybe you're not even decided yet.... ;) maybe you're still watching the situation, with Corona, and flights being opened, or whatever else is going on.... and then (maybe, just guessing) you make up your mind and seriously plan on staying more than 90 days on, or around, March 15th.

 

Then, on March 15th, you and your girlfriend go to Einwohnermeldeamt. You register as a resident. After that, you go to Ausländeramt and ask what you have to do to be allowed to stay. 
There are basically 3 "valid" reasons to live in Germany "long term": you have employment, or you get married, or you are a student.

 

It could also be that by mid March "normal" travel back and forth is possible again - and you could simply go back to the UK, find a job, come visit your girlfriend regularly like before all this happened.

 

Good luck!

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If you live in Germany you need medical insurance. Which does not come cheap. JohnG (insurance broker) will be along shortly no doubt.

If you are here and register later rather than sooner, you may find yourself saddled with medical insurance payments backdated to your date of arrival when you join the public medical insurance system. Being non-EU you will have to apply for a third country residence permit if you want to stay long-term. I doubt you will gain anything by procrastinating. If you leave after a visit of longer than 90 days be prepared to tell them why you do not have a visa when you leave the country.

 

I am not a lawyer.:lol:

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Good luck! For all other non EU foreigners this has been common sense. Go to buergeramt, Auslaenderbehoerde, get insurance. For each day you remain in Germany above the 90 day limit there's some sort of fine. I would get to this ASAP as everything is by appointment only and you cannot walk in to any government office. Plus Beamte are notorious for taking their sweet time in answering E-Mails, if not answering at all. You may have to go back before the 90 days. Sorry for your situation, but this is the reality people of other nationalities have been facing for years.

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So:

Work-job. What are your qualifications? What was your job in the UK

Do you speak any German?

If you want to stay- you need a visa , job, health insurance ( no NHS here- experts on TT are Starshollow, John G)

Driving licence- need to switch your UK licence for a German licence.

You have a German girl friend- she can help with phone enquiries, at the Amt etc. 

Others have given good advice and comments.  The option to go back to the UK might be good- you can reassess your situation and apply from there.

 

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I have read through various threads here in regards to third country residence permits so we will get on it ASAP and see what the advice is. I’m from Scotland and rather annoyed about having to leave the EU, may this change in the future! 
 

I was curious as to the 90 day stay entitlement so if it means I have to fly home before that then I will. Didn’t want to be breaking any rules that was all. Which it seems like I haven’t.

 

I am a barber to trade have been cutting hair for 7 years, have been learning German for over a year now and have been self learning software development/computer programming and coding due to the lockdown. Which seems to be highly sought after here.

 

Very much appreciate those who took time and replied, so thank you very much. 
 

BH

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Quote

I am a barber to trade have been cutting hair for 7 years, have been learning German for over a year now and have been self learning software development/computer programming and coding due to the lockdown. Which seems to be highly sought after here.

 

Germany is a country that values formal qualifications. Without formal qualifications you'll not be able to obtain a work permit as a third country national.

 

If you want to stay in Germany, you'll have to get married. 

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I am looking into gaining a formal qualification.

 

I know others who have came to Germany as barbers to work pre-Brexit and they are not married. Others have studied also from what I have read.

 

Seems slightly excessive to “have to get married”. 

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1 minute ago, Bobbyhall said:

I know others who have came to Germany as barbers to work pre-Brexit and they are not married.

 

They moved here as EU citizens under Freedom of Movement. Apples and oranges.

 

1 minute ago, Bobbyhall said:

Seems slightly excessive to “have to get married”. 

 

No, welcome to the life of third country nationals in the EU. 

 

As a third country national you need a purpose to be here. If you have sufficient funds (and your qualifications are recognised here) you could study. However,  without formal qualifications and a job commiserate to your education you are not entitled to a work permit.

 

This is a consequence of Brexit.

 

 

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That is pre-Brexit, Bobbyhall. The rules have changed.

Getting married isn’t a bad idea. Have done it a couple of times!😂

On a serious note, I feel sorry for you younger people from the UK ( whence I hence ) - the rules have changed.

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Technically I did arrive in Germany before the 31/12/2020. Will this stand me in good stead haha? 
 

Or should I have been registered before this date? 

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10 minutes ago, Bobbyhall said:

Technically I did arrive in Germany before the 31/12/2020. Will this stand me in good stead haha? 
 

Or should I have been registered before this date? 

 

Did you meet all the criteria for one of the Freedom of Movement categories on December 31, 2020? 

 

 

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Which are? I have a British passport so I was an EU citizen when I entered Germany. I have been with my partner for 5 years who is a German citizen.

 

Now all the flights have been cancelled to the UK so regardless I will have to apply for a visa if I can not register under the withdrawal agreement. 
 

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Under the pre Brexit Freedom of Movement  rules, you still needed to show work/ financial status/ health insurance status.

 

 

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10 minutes ago, Bobbyhall said:

Which are?

 

Look them up. I already gave you my opinion, but you didn't believe me. I no longer waste my time offering detailed legal explanations on this forum. 

 

10 minutes ago, Bobbyhall said:

 

I have a British passport so I was an EU citizen when I entered Germany.

 

Tourists don't fall under Freedom of Movement. 

 

10 minutes ago, Bobbyhall said:

I have been with my partner for 5 years who is a German citizen.

 

You are not married. 

 

10 minutes ago, Bobbyhall said:

Now all the flights have been cancelled to the UK so regardless I will have to apply for a visa if I can not register under the withdrawal agreement. 

 

You can't apply for a visa in Germany. It is only possible to apply for a visa abroad. You don't seem to meet any of the criteria for a residence permit either.

 

On the other hand you are allowed to spend upto 90 days here as a tourist. 

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18 hours ago, Bobbyhall said:

I have read through various threads here in regards to third country residence permits so we will get on it ASAP and see what the advice is. I’m from Scotland and rather annoyed about having to leave the EU, may this change in the future! 
 

 

BH

Please provide some important details

 

When did you arrive in Germany ?

 

Are you registered in Germany, which you should do if you are working here ?, Which date did you register in Germany ?

 

We need to know this to say what your options are.

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I fail to see any “detailed” legal explanations rather than “get married”. If you don’t want to give advice and be rather confrontational then if that makes your day good on ya. 
 

According to the government website if I had planned to stay for longer than 90 days it says I can apply for a visa within 14 days... I did not intend to stay here for longer than 90 days as I said, my flight was cancelled and all flights have now been cancelled until March which takes me beyond the 90 day mark. 
 

I came on the 20th of December. I am

not registered, the first available appointment is in March lol!

 

I am also not working here. I have savings and am working on gaining a qualification through virtual learning whilst here. 

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59 minutes ago, yesterday said:

Please provide some important details

 

When did you arrive in Germany ?

 

Are you registered in Germany, which you should do if you are working here ?, Which date did you register in Germany ?

 

We need to know this to say what your options are.

...well... those who read have an advantage over those who don't....

He arrived on December 20th 2020.
He did not register, it was supposed to be a vacation over Christmas with his girlfriend.

He is not working in Germany. 

 

All the options have already been explained in great detail.

1, leave before 90 days are over

2, once back "home" in the UK either

2 a, go on with life as he did before (visit girlfriend from time to time, as schedules permit)

2 b, investigate possible "permanent" stay in Germany and apply for appropriate visa (based on job, study, or marriage), making sure health insurance and funding/income are dealt with accordingly

 

It's not rocket science :)

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2 hours ago, karin_brenig said:

...well... those who read have an advantage over those who don't...

He arrived on December 20th 2020.
He did not register, it was supposed to be a vacation over Christmas with his girlfriend.

He is not working in Germany. 

 

All the options have already been explained in great detail.

1, leave before 90 days are over

2, once back "home" in the UK either

2 a, go on with life as he did before (visit girlfriend from time to time, as schedules permit)

2 b, investigate possible "permanent" stay in Germany and apply for appropriate visa (based on job, study, or marriage), making sure health insurance and funding/income are dealt with accordingly

 

It's not rocket science :)

sorry I did not read right from the top

 

But you are of course right

 

Thanks

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