Garden irrigation system - drip or perlschlauch - pressure question

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On 18/03/2022, 13:37:33, Gambatte said:

No matter how much you can spend buying tomatoes, or whatever, you can't buy any as good as those from the garden. You just can't. Ripe tomatoes, or strawberry, or whatever, eaten 5min after harvesting they just taste heaven. Completely different from anything one can buy. Those who never tried can't possibly know.

 

I kind of stumbled across this fact when I grew strawberries. Then a few blueberries. They were amazing in comparison to what I bought in the shop, no matter which shop I went to.

 

Then I planed a lot of blueberries and strawberries, perhaps too many. Bought and planted a few fruit trees, but have yet to see any fruit, but sure, it takes time with these. Gradually they grow. Last year planted red and black currants and gooseberries and tried for the first time growing tomatoes. Some grew well, and some died mainly due to lack of watering on my part. Other plants I put in the garden didn't survive the winter, figs and kiwi for example. After trying for a couple of years, decided to give up with these and try grapes instead. They seem to have survived the winter. Finally Munich see the night temperature creep above negative. 

 

My neighbours, who are mostly retired folk, just seem to enjoy sitting the garden and occasionally watching their automatic mowers mow the grass. I am sure they think I am like the guy who was on that old TV show, 'the good life'. Nothing as extreme, but I do see very few people bother to grow their own food. It takes effort, but compared to what is mass produced for us today in the supermarkets, there is just no comparison.

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7 minutes ago, scook17 said:

 

I kind of stumbled across this fact when I grew strawberries. Then a few blueberries. They were amazing in comparison to what I bought in the shop, no matter which shop I went to.

 

 

I've been growing my own tomatos for some years now.  As you say, there's no comparison to what you can buy.  I planted this years seeds on Sunday last and I'm just waiting for the little green shoots to appear. I still have plenty of my home made tomato sauce from last year to keep me going until the new crop comes in later in summer.

 

Enjoy your garden, it doesn't matter what your neighbours do or don't do, you're making the best use of that green space.

 

 

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5 hours ago, Tap said:

I still have plenty of my home made tomato sauce from last year to keep me going

 

Frozen? 

 

Or do you can or something scary like that?

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31 minutes ago, kiplette said:

 

Frozen? 

 

Or do you can or something scary like that?

 

All in portions in the freezer, but I might store it in steralised jars this year.  I make jam every year and it's basically the same process.

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the summer before last I made almost 200 jars of tomatoes. Of course, in glass jars, not frozen. I poured the sauce, still hot, into the hot jars (just out of the oven), and closed. Although this was probably sufficient to have them sterile, to be even surer I 'boiled' the jars.

 

Last summer instead I got no tomatoes at all, like most folks around here. Probably too much rain, they were all destroyed by tomato blight. They say the spore can survive 1yr so I'm following the suggestion of no tomatoes this year. Pity. Will do other stuff like peas beans chillies.

 

Also tons of cherries and raspberries of course, "strawby" and "himby" as we nicknamed them in our family.

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6 minutes ago, Gambatte said:

the summer before last I made almost 200 jars of tomatoes. Of course, in glass jars, not frozen. I poured the sauce, still hot, into the hot jars (just out of the oven), and closed. Although this was probably sufficient to have them sterile, to be even surer I 'boiled' the jars.

 

Very much the jam process then. An old dude I spoke to was saying that with apfel mush he puts a little vodka in on top of the mush and burns it as he puts the lid on, to burn off the oxygen. Quite cool. 

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16 minutes ago, Gambatte said:

the summer before last I made almost 200 jars of tomatoes. Of course, in glass jars, not frozen. I poured the sauce, still hot, into the hot jars (just out of the oven), and closed. Although this was probably sufficient to have them sterile, to be even surer I 'boiled' the jars.

 

 

 

That's how I do it with various fruit jams and jars of apple sauce (from an orchard nearby) . The jars will be sterilised when put in the oven at 100 degrees for about 20 minutes.  I always have a sense of achievement when I hear the lids pop and know a vacuum has been created.

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24 minutes ago, Tap said:

I always have a sense of achievement when I hear the lids pop and know a vacuum has been created.

:)

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41 minutes ago, kiplette said:

An old dude I spoke to was saying that with apfel mush he puts a little vodka in on top of the mush and burns it as he puts the lid on, to burn off the oxygen. Quite cool. 

Well, cool for sure.

But hey most home jam makers do not do it and do not get ill from their jam.

I do 'boil' the jars after closing them hot. But I suspect that's not necessary and it's only a waste of time and energy...:wacko::mellow:

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You jam makers with English as native language, should we not say "apple jam" and "pear jam", rather than sauce or mousse or whatever else?

After all the process is the same as with strawberry and raspberry, more or less, isn't it...?

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1 hour ago, Gambatte said:

You jam makers with English as native language, should we not say "apple jam" and "pear jam", rather than sauce or mousse or whatever else?

After all the process is the same as with strawberry and raspberry, more or less, isn't it...?

 

Yes, the process is the same, but I would never say "apple jam", it's an apple sauce or an apple compote, but I really can't say why

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It's a different thing. 

 

Apple mush is just apples heated and squished. Adding sugar is an unnecessary extra. Cinnanmon/cloves or vanilla or whatever might be added. Hence the dude with the vodka - there is less sugar to act as a preservative. 

 

Jam is a set thing, more or less wobbly depending on what you want/how much pectin you add. We don't tend to make apple jam or jelly from the juice, to be honest, I don't think I've seen either. People must, because there are recipes out there, eg. Apple jam recipe | BBC Good Food - including the stage where pectin is added (as lemon juice) to get a 'set'. As snowing says, the jam usually has lumps in - tbf our apple mush has lumps in usually, too :).

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What's the Difference Between Jam, Jelly, Compote, and Conserve?

 

 

Quote

Jam consists of fruit that's crushed or chopped and cooked with sugar (and sometimes pectin and an acid) until the pieces of fruit are soft and lose their shape.


The primary difference between jam and jelly is that jelly is strained for a gem-like clarity without fruit solids.

Jams made from a mixture of various fruits are called conserves. Basically, all conserves are jams, but not all jams are conserves.

Compote can be made with fresh or dried fruit (whole or cut into pieces) that's slowly cooked in a sugar syrup (sometimes containing liquor and spices). Slow cooking is important for the fruit to maintain its shape.


… marmalade is a soft jelly that contains pieces of fruit rind (usually citrus).

 


I love growing fruit and veg. Peaches are my favourite. So much better than store bought nonsense.

 

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In my apple "jam" I do add sugar. I wouldn't mind doing without but I guess it's necessary to preserve it and to give it some body.

It is also not chunky, I blend it with the same immersion blender I use for everything else.

@kiplette interesting you write sugar is not necessary. I just googled it, one bbc recipe for apple "compote" does saysay to add sugar.

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@Boggsdollocks

But if I take the definition you linked, there's no reason there can't be apple jam, provided one makes it the "jam way"😉.

And can you grow peaches here in Germany?? I thought it was too cold. I live near Hamburg, probably not colder than the south, because of the sea.

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9 minutes ago, Gambatte said:

I just googled it, one bbc recipe for apple "compote" does saysay to add sugar.

 

Yes, I think lots of recipes would include it - but the amounts are nothing like with jam, where it's often half and half. Boggs' link above (very interesting) talks about sugar being the main preserving agent in jam, whereas compote is usually to be eaten fresh.

 

When we used to buy it we looked for the ones without sugar, and I certainly would never put any in. 

 

The one time I made it to keep, I did the vodka trick from the old dude, which was fun and it was still fresh after 6 months in the cupboard. The scrapings of the one I made 2 weeks ago went mouldy yesterday in the fridge (forgot it was still there). 

 

5 minutes ago, Gambatte said:

if I take the definition you linked, there's no reason there can't be apple jam,

 

There is indeed such a thing :)

 

Tesco could be set to sell apple jam after they bought a secret homemade recipe | Daily Mail Online

 

 

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@Gambatte Eating jams is more my thing than making it! I suppose you could make an apple jelly and throw in pieces of apple and call it apple jam..? 
You can absolutely grow peaches in Germany. I have two dwarf peach trees, one produces the standard round fruit, the other the flat, saucer type.  I bought them from https://www.obstbaeume.de/ about 7 years ago and they’ve been stellar.

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Rhubarb time!

So exciting, my Rubarb plants seem now ready, this weekend I will be making jam. Super happy. Just will struggle having to fit it with the other zillion things to do in the garden, sport, shopping, family...

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On 24/03/2022, 21:47:38, Boggsdollocks said:

@Gambatte Eating jams is more my thing than making it! I suppose you could make an apple jelly and throw in pieces of apple and call it apple jam..? 
You can absolutely grow peaches in Germany. I have two dwarf peach trees, one produces the standard round fruit, the other the flat, saucer type.  I bought them from https://www.obstbaeume.de/ about 7 years ago and they’ve been stellar.

 

I bought one and it suffered last year from red leaves with dark red spots. Some disease I presume, but have no idea what to treat it with. How do you look after your peach trees?

 

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