Why this forum speaks English and not German

125 posts in this topic

I think, there is some kind of hate towards English speakers in Germany, and that immigrants prefer to speak English and not German. Even though most TT users have decent command of German, we communicate in English here. Why? 

 

This is why:

 

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Two months after Adolf Hitler was appointed chancellor, the German government issued the Gesetz zur Wiederherstellung des Berufsbeamtentums—the Law for the Restoration of the Professional Civil Service. With some exceptions, none of which lasted for long, the 7 April 1933 law ordered that those in government positions who had at least one Jewish grandparent or were political opponents of the Nazi Party be immediately dismissed. Thousands of people lost their jobs as teachers, judges, police officers—and academics at the country’s top universities.

Over the next several years, hundreds of German scientists and other intellectuals would flee to the UK, the US, and dozens of other countries to protect their livelihoods and their lives. The Nazi regime pushed out leading researchers such as Albert Einstein, Hans Krebs, and even national hero Fritz Haber, who had helped develop chemical weapons during World War I. The extraordinary intellectual exodus would have tremendous implications for not only Germany but also the countries that took in the refugees.

 

 

Most modern technology is based on discoveries made in the first half of 20 century, people like Bloch, Einstein and  Schrödinger, should they stayed in Germany, would make German the main lingua franca in science, technology, and business.

 

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A 2016 study found that the 15% of physicists who were dismissed from German universities accounted for 64% of all German physics citations. 

 

Most of them fled to the UK and the US, these two countries still produce a significant proportion of the Nobel Prize winners. And this is why we speak English. Not German. Not French. Not Chinese. English. 

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I always thought it was because Ed Bob speaks english and he wanted to give the english speakers in Munich somewhere to meet up online??

Added added to that (as el jeffo says above), a lot of people speak english. Even where more people speak another language (chine for example), those that would be on this site from that area will speak english.

 

I've seen people come to the UK, start leaning english and be able to go shopping with confidence 6 months later. I've only met one person who did that with german and she already spoke Italian, Spanish, French and Portuguese already. Given that she spoke almost perfect German after 6 months I never really took her as being an average example.

 

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I've always seen TT as a support group for expats so it makes sense to speak English because people who just moved here and even for the first couple of years might have a hard time following the conversation otherwise.

 

It's also relaxing to switch to your own language after a hard day of work. Not that English is mine but it's still better than my German.

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3 minutes ago, LeonG said:

I've always seen TT as a support group for expats so it makes sense to speak English because people who just moved here and even for the first couple of years might have a hard time following the conversation otherwise.

 

It's also relaxing to switch to your own language after a hard day of work. Not that English is mine but it's still better than my German.

Not to mention being able to ask for help when needed.

Does make you wonder why some users go out of their way to alienate themselves from the rest of the forum. Some people are not that bight really. 

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@yourkeau what's your point? It's a no-brainer that TT was set up by English-speaking Bob for English-speaking ex-pats in Munich. The rest is history. How you come to link it to how English has become an international language, is beyond me, but please explain!

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39 minutes ago, LeonG said:

I've always seen TT as a support group for expats so it makes sense to speak English because people who just moved here and even for the first couple of years might have a hard time following the conversation otherwise.

 

It's also relaxing to switch to your own language after a hard day of work. Not that English is mine but it's still better than my German.

This is the point of this thread. Why a Iceland man and a Ukrainian communicate in English, and not in Spanish, Portuguese, or German? 

 

Because of the Nazis, even though this was so long ago. 

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4 minutes ago, yourkeau said:

This is the point of this thread. Why a Iceland man and a Ukrainian communicate in English, and not in Spanish, Portuguese, or German? 

 

Because of the Nazis

 

Dumbest user of the week award.

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Well, I always say to my colleagues that Portuguese or Spanish is a much more important language than German, as outside DACH it has zero importance.

They are not too thrilled with that idea and don´t actually accept it.

 

I think the main reason that German is not important is because it is not a simple language to learn and even within Germany each dialect reduces its value.

English won not just because of US. It won because it is a poor language (as opposed to rich languages), therefore simple and unambiguous.

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The nazis are responsible for the demise of spanish and portugese as a world language?

1840s Nazis??

 

 

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12 minutes ago, MikeMelga said:

Well, I always say to my colleagues that Portuguese or Spanish is a much more important language than German, as outside DACH it has zero importance.

They are not too thrilled with that idea and don´t actually accept it.

 

I think the main reason that German is not important is because it is not a simple language to learn and even within Germany each dialect reduces its value.

English won not just because of US. It won because it is a poor language (as opposed to rich languages), therefore simple and unambiguous.

I read in a book once (and it was even one of languages) that the further a language is spread, the more simple and flexible it has to be.

It has to accommodate changes that crop up over time but still allow a person from one end of the area it's used to understand another from the other end.

 

I was chatting to a colleague about this whole gender pronoun stuff and we had a laugh at how German is going to accommodate any kind of 'they' usage for someone who doesn't want to be identified as he or she.

Old people would lose their shit as the rest of the sentence would just lock their thought process up. Everyone is talking about a person, but referring to them as 'they'.

I think I will have to start that conversation at some point over Christmas.. 

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1 hour ago, yourkeau said:

And this is why we speak English. Not German. Not French. Not Chinese. English. 

 

 This was already in place way before the Nazi era. Colonialism and the fact that spoken English is not desperately complicated seem to be the main factors. 

 

Spanish is also very widely spoken. German never really had a proper shot at it, and the decision was done long before the first half of the last century.

 

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13 minutes ago, cb6dba said:

I read in a book once (and it was even one of languages) that the further a language is spread, the more simple and flexible it has to be.

It has to accommodate changes that crop up over time but still allow a person from one end of the area it's used to understand another from the other end.

 

Well, what I can tell you is that Portuguese is quite homogeneous around the world. I guess it´s easier for me to understand a Portuguese speaker from India than a guy from Stuttgart understanding Bayersich!

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2 hours ago, yourkeau said:

I think, there is some kind of hate towards English speakers in Germany

I'm not feeling' it.  

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15 minutes ago, BethAnnBitt said:

I'm not feeling' it.  

I`d say I`ve only ever experienced the exact opposite.I`ve lost count of how many Germans like to practise their English on me.

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Just now, Keleth said:

I`d say I`ve only ever experienced the exact opposite.I`ve lost count of how many Germans like to practise their English on me.

We even have another thread where people complain that Germans won't speak German to them...

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2 hours ago, yourkeau said:

Most modern technology is based on discoveries made in the first half of 20 century, people like Bloch, Einstein and  Schrödinger, should they stayed in Germany, would make German the main lingua franca in science, technology, and business.

 

Modern-modern tech is based on science that germans back then decried as being incorrect and beneath german science.

 

"Deutsche Physik was opposed to the work of Albert Einstein and other modern theoretically based physics, which was disparagingly labeled "Jewish physics" (German: Jüdische Physik)."

 

"During the early years of the twentieth century, Albert Einstein's Theory of Relativity caused bitter controversy within the worldwide physics community. There were many physicists, especially the "old guard", who were suspicious of the intuitive meanings of Einstein's theories. While the response to Einstein was based in part on his concepts being a radical break from earlier theories, there was also an anti-Jewish element to some of the criticism. The leading theoretician of the Deutsche Physik type of movement was Rudolf Tomaschek, who had re-edited the famous physics textbook Grimsehl's Lehrbuch der Physik. In that book, which consists of several volumes, the Lorentz transformation was accepted, as well as quantum theory. However, Einstein's interpretation of the Lorentz transformation was not mentioned, and Einstein's name was completely ignored. Many classical physicists resented Einstein's dismissal of the notion of a luminiferous aether, which had been a mainstay of their work for the majority of their productive lives. They were not convinced by the empirical evidence for relativity. They believed that the measurements of the perihelion of Mercury and the null result of the Michelson–Morley experiment might be explained in other ways, and the results of the Eddington eclipse experiment were experimentally problematic enough to be dismissed as meaningless by the more devoted doubters. Many of them were very distinguished experimental physicists, and Lenard was himself a Nobel laureate in physics."

 

"It is occasionally put forth[12] that there is a great irony in the Nazis' labeling modern physics as "Jewish science", since it was exactly modern physics—and the work of many European exiles—which was used to create the atomic bomb. Even if the German government had not embraced Lenard and Stark's ideas, the German antisemitic agenda was enough by itself to destroy the Jewish scientific community in Germany. Furthermore, the German nuclear weapons program was never pursued with anywhere near the vigor of the Manhattan Project in the United States, and for that reason would likely not have succeeded in any case.[13] The movement did not actually go as far as preventing the nuclear energy scientists from using quantum mechanics and relativity,[14] but the education of young scientists and engineers suffered, not only from the loss of the Jewish scientists but also from political appointments and other interference. In 1938, Himmler wrote to Heisenberg that he could discuss modern physics but not mention Jewish scientists such as Bohr and Einstein in connection with it."

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deutsche_Physik

 

The uncertainty of a probabilistic world was not befitting of the German mind ... (or so they thought).

 

 

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This is the first time I've seen a thread for which Godwin's Law can be applied to the first post.  Well done!

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