How many of you will trust Covid-19 vaccine with own lives?

How many of you will trust Covid-19 vaccine with own lives?   112 votes

  1. 1. How many of you will trust Covid-19 vaccine with own lives?

    • I will do it, this vaccine is made by doctors, and they know how is done and if is efficient.
      74
    • I will not do it, doctors got different opinions about side effects, for the moment they don't trust this vaccine, why should I do it?
      3
    • Vaccine? For Covid-19? GTFOOH! Doctors still learn the virus and you want to do a vaccine? Are you insane?
      3
    • They plan to force people to do the vaccine, in order to fly, otherwise you cannot fly or travel internationally without one.
      10
    • I am ok without one, I am still healthy, after 8-9 months of ''quarantine living'. With mask and disinfectants who needs a vaccine?
      2
    • I will do it, but in a year or so, first persons are ''lab rats'' testers. I don't trust them yet.
      18
    • I was already sick. No need for a vaccine for me.
      2

Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

822 posts in this topic

25 minutes ago, john g. said:

Anyone have a reasonable idea whether you will be able to have the Covid jab and the flu jab within a short time of each other?

I was at the doctor last year, got a Tetanus B, after 2 months they tested to see if it worked and it did not.

 

The Doctor said, the more vaccines you take at the same time, normally increases its effectiveness. so the next time I tried the local flu jab with a rabies jab and the tetanus jab.

 

Then the did the test later on, and it worked better.

 

So in general I would take as many as you can

 

 

 

 

20 minutes ago, john g. said:

The question also arises- will it be mandatory? I certainly expect it to be the case in the near future to be able to travel from country A to B. 
As others have pointed out, mandatory jabs have always been around for visits to certain parts of the world anyway.

 

Normally its not mandatory, but you may be prevented from traveling some places if you have not had it -- but thats not normal 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, john g. said:

The question also arises- will it be mandatory? I certainly expect it to be the case in the near future to be able to travel from country A to B. 
As others have pointed out, mandatory jabs have always been around for visits to certain parts of the world anyway.

The target is 70% of the population for herd immunity. If you consider local fluctuations, they should try to get more than that.

My guess is around 40-50% will do it volutarely from day one. This should be achieved by April/May.

Then they might reach 60-65% with the people that are waiting to see side effects, somewhere during the summer.

The problem will be the last 15-20%. I think for those they will still avoid mandatory vaccine, but they might link the vaccine to certain jobs like teacher. It´s still not mandatory, but you can´t work without it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, kaffeemitmilch said:

BTW do you all also get the flu vaccine?

 

Yes I did last week - for the very first time.

 

I'd been quite ill twice earlier this year so I had a chat with our local GP & she said that it would be advisable to have it this time around.

The difficulty was getting hold of the vaccine - I'm privately insured & so have to get vaccine from the Apotheke & there was none to be had for love nor money.

After several weeks of trying I mentioned this in a mail to the GP on some other subject & got a nice mail back "we have reserved one for you - just come by".

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, yourkeau said:

I would volunteer for vaccine testing before it is allowed to be used in public (either as a virus carrier patient or control group, depending on my situation) if offered to. Today I donated my blood for science (to the cancer researchers), for example. 

 

Good for you. Volunteering in that kind of way definitely deserves recognition and not ridicule. 

 

I am generally pro-vaccination, having had a close call with TB as a kid, and been a fan of the Chalet School books and therefore knowing how that one turns out. Assuming you are not allergic to an ingredient then I think it is the right thing to do, otherwise there will be no herd immunity, and vulnerable people who can't be vaccinated will still be at risk. 

 

That graphic up the page had me surprised that the USA is not more anti vax, and France? Who knew? What's the problem there? 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's recommended I have the flu shot thanks to the immunosuppressing drugs I take, but I think I've forgotten 2 years out of 5 so far. I did have it this year free from Bosch (I assume I could have also had it free from the Hausarzt if I'd asked). I don't know if this'll make me some kind of priority for the Corona vaccine - probably not high priority.

 

As a baby my parents listened to the scare stories about Whooping Cough vaccine causing brain damage and didn't have me vaccinated. Of course I then caught Whooping Cough when I was two - which apparently was quite serious, not that I remember anything. When my brother was born they didn't hesitate to get him vaccinated. 

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a side note - a friend of a friend who works at the MPI believes it will take until fall 2021 until everybody in Germany can get the/a/any Covid vaccination.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, dessa_dangerous said:

I think a lot of people--provided they were willing to change their minds--could be edified by watching some more of these "corona-specials" in the news that focus on the work being done in the hospitals themselves. 

I`d say 90% of them are not willing to change their minds that`s the problem.When they watch those corona specials they think it`s all lies or overblown.

My niece is an operating theatre nurse in Dortmund and because they have so many cases there and the ICU is almost full she is not allowed to go home to her flat,she now has to live in one of the nurses apartments on site and is definitely not allowed to go out even to shop.Everything is delivered to her.Meals she can only have with other OP and ICU personnel.She is in a really strict lockdown.

Then you hear from someone that their friend from a friends girlfriends cousin twice removed is a nurse and they are being sent home because there is no patients ergo Corona is not bad and overblown.Although that is true for some nurses who work on general wards it is most definitely not true for ICU and OP nurses but because people don`t see it for themselves they don`t believe it.

 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A suggestion for another answer on the poll..

 

Depends what it says on Facebook and the Chans.

 

Because you just know many people are going to rely on the internet to decide if they`ll take it or not.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, MikeMelga said:

Sure, 3rd world countries know what happens without them. On the other extreme we have very developed countries who lost contact with reality.

Yes, my father's cousin  brother got polio as a child. He is now 60, and struggles with his normal body weight to walk with it.  

No child deserves that f** ing disease. And all other preventable diseases

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As for me, I am leaning on getting it. My spouse works directly with covid patients so he will be getting it at his workplace. As for me, I don't know when I will be able to get the first dose. I'm in Hessen, so they're not exactly as organised or at least they don't publicise things online as well as other areas I find. It came out fast, but I remember the swine flu vaccine also came out quickly. Now to be honest, if I were pregnant I would not get it. Don't get me wrong, I am all for vaccines and I have gotten most of the recommended ones. But there will always be that bit of fear of "what if" with no long term studies or actually NO STUDIES in pregnant women. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Metall said:

On a side note - a friend of a friend who works at the MPI believes it will take until fall 2021 until everybody in Germany can get the/a/any Covid vaccination.

That sounds about right and thankfully we don't need to get to anywhere near 100% coverage to see the benefits. Even before we reach the 70% or whatever it is to provide herd immunity to Covid we will see the rate of new infections tumbling as more and more people are vaccinated. 

 

It will be interesting to see the model chosen. The assumption is that it's best to vaccinate the most vulnerable (elderly and those with comorbidities) and healthcare workers first and I reckon that's fair enough but then just to go by age starting with the oldest may be the wrong way. Vaccinating those with most contact to others would surely provide a more effective fire break but the resources to implement such a selective process likely don't exist and a simpler by the numbers approach may get everyone done faster.

 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, murphaph said:

Vaccinating those with most contact to others would surely provide a more effective fire break but the resources to implement such a selective process likely don't exist and a simpler by the numbers approach may get everyone done faster.

 

That would require vaccinating all schoolchildren, which isn't going to happen, because none of the vaccines have been tested on children. No one under the age of 18 will be able to get the vaccine.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@murphaph I tend to disagree.  I think it is critical to take a focused, staged approach on immunization to ensure that there is no breakdown in services.  So, my thinking is a model like this:

 

  • Healthcare workers
  • Critical service workers (police, fire)
  • Critical infrastructure workers (power, water, transportation)
  • Essential workers (educators, government, distribution, selected retail)
  • At-risk/vulnerable
  • Everyone else

This should be manageable.  It‘s been done before.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do the vaccines stop the spread of the disease, or do they prevent the symptoms? I understood it was more the latter, in which case you have to start with the most vulnerable and make sure they're protected as basically the virus will be allowed to run riot and most people will have it sooner or later.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Dembo said:

Do the vaccines stop the spread of the disease, or do they prevent the symptoms? I understood it was more the latter, in which case you have to start with the most vulnerable and make sure they're protected as basically the virus will be allowed to run riot and most people will have it sooner or later.

 

Vaccines are designed to stop the spread.  If you already have it, the vaccine will do nothing.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Space Cowboy said:

Vaccines are designed to stop the spread.  If you already have it, the vaccine will do nothing.

 

To clarify:

  • vaccines allow your body to make antibodies against a virus - without being exposed to the virus itself
  • vaccines can prime you immune system to produce more antibodies than when exposed to the virus itself

So whether you've already caught COVID-19 or not, vaccine is beneficial - and of course they prevent symptoms as well as spread!

 

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My uncle went blind from whooping cough. Not sure how it happened exactly, but his optic nerves were damaged when he had it.

 

So, our pediatrician suggested foregoing the flu shot as it's heavy, and if one were to get COVID at the same time as the flu vaccine, it could be quite bad for the body. Plus, because none of us are in a risk group, she said they don't have enough in the country anyway, and that it would be better for us not to do it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, jubinjohn said:

Yes, my father's cousin  brother got polio as a child. He is now 60, and struggles with his normal body weight to walk with it.  

No child deserves that f** ing disease. And all other preventable diseases

I read this article a few days ago... terrible disease! But an inspiring story!

https://alcalde.texasexes.org/2020/09/one-of-the-last-people-to-live-in-an-iron-lung-is-a-longhorn/

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, Dembo said:

Do the vaccines stop the spread of the disease, or do they prevent the symptoms? I understood it was more the latter, in which case you have to start with the most vulnerable and make sure they're protected as basically the virus will be allowed to run riot and most people will have it sooner or later.

Basically small amounts of virus get into your throat. Then they reproduce for a few days and when enough exist, you are contagious, meaning you will expell enough virus to contaminate others.

What the vaccine does is allows your body to fight the virus right at start, preventing reproduction, therefore preventing you from becoming contagious. And of course saving you.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now