How many of you will trust Covid-19 vaccine with own lives?

How many of you will trust Covid-19 vaccine with own lives?   84 votes

  1. 1. How many of you will trust Covid-19 vaccine with own lives?

    • I will do it, this vaccine is made by doctors, and they know how is done and if is efficient.
      53
    • I will not do it, doctors got different opinions about side effects, for the moment they don't trust this vaccine, why should I do it?
      1
    • Vaccine? For Covid-19? GTFOOH! Doctors still learn the virus and you want to do a vaccine? Are you insane?
      1
    • They plan to force people to do the vaccine, in order to fly, otherwise you cannot fly or travel internationally without one.
      9
    • I am ok without one, I am still healthy, after 8-9 months of ''quarantine living'. With mask and disinfectants who needs a vaccine?
      2
    • I will do it, but in a year or so, first persons are ''lab rats'' testers. I don't trust them yet.
      16
    • I was already sick. No need for a vaccine for me.
      2

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454 posts in this topic

I gave up trying to decide which side to support on Israel-palestinian conflict. Both sides are full of assholes. Now I support none.

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On 11/01/2021, 21:07:31, RajeshG said:

The bottle necks ( atleast at the care homes ) were - 

  • The care takers have to prepare the documents for each resident +. their consent or that of their power of attorney before hand and coordinate the old people to come out at intervals so as not to infect them in this vaccination process
  • Doctors have to explain in details about the vaccine and its effect to each and every person again and again
  • The admin person has to put in all the data into a laptop and push it to the central server using a weak data network

But they are all getting better at it, it seems

 

Today my partner got the 2nd dose. Germany is doing it correctly by giving both the doses at the right time. And no side reactions or  even minor discomfort, atleast till now.

 

So go ahead folks, get inoculated when you get an opportunity. 

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31 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

 

Ok. So now we can assume that your nationality is Israeli. 

 

Thanks for the info.

Because all Israelis think the same on political issues just like Americans, LOL

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14 minutes ago, MikeMelga said:

I gave up trying to decide which side to support on Israel-palestinian conflict. Both sides are full of assholes. Now I support none.

Neither do I. But with one little difference: I don't want to die.

 

 

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Kid#1 who lives in a house of 15 in the UK and had to isolate in the autumn when the Covid doctor from upstairs tested positive is now in isolation again because a downstairs housemate tested positive today.

 

Now this girl got her first vaccination dose last week because she is a medic (and got a nasty fever, but short lived). She then went straight back onto the Covid ward and is now positive. 

 

None of those who have had their jab (the house includes 2 docs and a dentist) is expecting their second dose any time soon.

 

Not quite the jolly hockey sticks picture the UK is wanting to share.

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8 hours ago, RajeshG said:

. And no side reactions or  even minor discomfort, atleast till now.

I´m not sure I´d regard that a good thing. A reaction is indicative of the immune response to the vaccine. By that logic lack of reaction may be indicative of lack thereof (or only a weak one) which wouldn´t be too uncommon e. g. in immunosuppressed patients. At least that´s how I would view it when it comes to conventional vaccines. Don´t know what to make of it with regard to those new mRNA vaccines. But it wouldn´t hurt to have the level of antibodies checked a few weeks after the second dose, methinks.

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7 hours ago, kiplette said:

Now this girl got her first vaccination dose last week because she is a medic (and got a nasty fever, but short lived). She then went straight back onto the Covid ward and is now positive. 

It takes a while for immunity to develop. Going back straight after having received the vaccine means going back without protection.

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Let's remember that even after the second shot you "only" get 95% chance of protection. There will be many stupid news articles of people who got the second shot and still got the virus hard.

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11 hours ago, yourkeau said:

No, where do you have this bullshit from? All 3 qualified acquaintances of mine got their 2nd doses. Indeed the line to 2nd dose was shorter than the line to 1st one, but 2nd does is 100% reserved for everyone getting the first one. So far:

2.2 mln got the first dose

550k second dose

 

 

 

This so-called 'bullshit' comes from Israel itself as they are the ones who have published the data. Scientific data is always published for peer review and this very reason. Other countries can take a look at the data and decide whether to follow Israel (and the UK) and give the first dose to as many people as possible and hold back on the second dose for longer than the manufacturer recommends or, based on this data, stick to the manufacturer's recommendations. The last thing anybody wants is for people to be vaccinated and we are still in the same situation at the end of this year with lots of new cases/deaths and we need another lockdown.

 

Take a deep breath and calm down, just because there is something mentioned about Israel is a non-positive way doesn't mean the whole world is against your country or religion or it is a personal attack against you.

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4 hours ago, jeba said:

It takes a while for immunity to develop. Going back straight after having received the vaccine means going back without protection.

 

I suppose in the case of medical personnel in an overstretched system that is inevitable. 

 

The not giving a second dose does not sound like a cunning plan, but maybe they are right that one dose will give some people immunity, and you get to more people quicker with the one dose, and over all it will result in immunity in larger numbers of people quicker than doing it 'properly'.

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4 minutes ago, kiplette said:

 

I suppose in the case of medical personnel in an overstretched system that is inevitable. 

 

The not giving a second dose does not sound like a cunning plan, but maybe they are right that one dose will give some people immunity, and you get to more people quicker with the one dose, and over all it will result in immunity in larger numbers of people quicker than doing it 'properly'.

It´s not a binary thing where you either have immunity or not. There are many shades of grey in between and a single dose should already be enough to significantly reduce the risk to become severely ill from covid 19 even if you catch it.

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So do you think what the UK is doing is an OK plan, given that their Covid numbers are so high?

 

And also, while you are here, doesn't immunising people in a population where the target virus is present in high numbers encourage resistant strains to develop? 

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Personally I would say with the high-risk groups you shouldn't take any chances and follow the manufacturer's guidelines so 2 jabs 4 weeks (I think) apart. For people in the non-high risk groups then spacing the jabs out may be an idea as people will get some protection and it will allow more people to be vaccinated and get some immunity in a shorter period of time.

 

The number of infections may not decrease as much as people would like but the number of deaths should come down significantly as the high-risk groups are the ones that are likely to end up in intensive care.

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https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20210114-covid-19-how-effective-is-a-single-vaccine-dose

According to Pfizer data published in December 2020, the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is roughly 52% effective after the first dose.

However, this early protection comes with some important caveats. First, the protection doesn't kick in until at least day 12 .

 

For the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, things are a bit different. In a paper published in January, the authors explain that the vaccine offers protection of 64.1% after at least one standard dose. This compares to 70.4% if you've had two full doses, or – oddly – 90% in people who have had one half dose followed by one full dose.

 

According to a document the company submitted to the FDA, the Moderna vaccine can provide 80.2% protection after one dose, compared to 95.6% after the second (in people aged 18 to 65 – it's 86.4% in those over 65). 

 

 

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9 hours ago, MikeMelga said:

Let's remember that even after the second shot you "only" get 95% chance of protection. There will be many stupid news articles of people who got the second shot and still got the virus hard.

And after 2 weeks, not immediately.

 

9 hours ago, warsteiner70 said:

 

This so-called 'bullshit' comes from Israel itself as they are the ones who have published the data. Scientific data is always published for peer review and this very reason. Other countries can take a look at the data and decide whether to follow Israel (and the UK) and give the first dose to as many people as possible and hold back on the second dose for longer than the manufacturer recommends or, based on this data, stick to the manufacturer's recommendations. The last thing anybody wants is for people to be vaccinated and we are still in the same situation at the end of this year with lots of new cases/deaths and we need another lockdown.

 

Take a deep breath and calm down, just because there is something mentioned about Israel is a non-positive way doesn't mean the whole world is against your country or religion or it is a personal attack against you.

Sorry, English is not my native language, and I did not expect that you will be offended by the word "bullshit".

 

What you write is factually incorrect. There is no such policy in Israel to administer only one dose. Some expert suggested this approach, but the ministry of health quickly responded that this is forbidden. Also it is forbidden to mix doses of different producers (Pfizer and Moderna).

 

 

Quote

 

The Ministry of Health clarifies that anyone who received the first vaccine dose will also receive the second dose that was reserved for him or her during the administration of the first dose.

The only exemptions will be those who became sick after receiving the first dose.

 

 

https://www.gov.il/en/departments/news/05012021-02

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12 minutes ago, Keleth said:

According to Pfizer data published in December 2020, the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is roughly 52% effective after the first dose.

However, this early protection comes with some important caveats. First, the protection doesn't kick in until at least day 12 .

Another problem is, the protection of the first dose does not last long. 2-3 months and that's it, you are unvaccinated again.

 

Second does should work for 6 months at least.

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3 minutes ago, yourkeau said:

Another problem is, the protection of the first dose does not last long. 2-3 months and that's it,

Pfizer and BioNTech themselves have already urged caution on the grounds that their data ends at day 21, and "there is no data to demonstrate that protection after the first dose is sustained after 21 days". 

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Yes. So I don't understand this desire to experiment.

 

It seems Germany follows the same approach as Israel: vaccinnate old people first, then younger ones.

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12 hours ago, kiplette said:

So do you think what the UK is doing is an OK plan, given that their Covid numbers are so high?

 

And also, while you are here, doesn't immunising people in a population where the target virus is present in high numbers encourage resistant strains to develop? 

Yes, probably. At least, you wouldn´t think twice about it with conventional vaccines.

What you refer to in your second sentence is a problem which can´t be avoided anyway as e.g. in parts of South Africa or Brazil you have herd immunity already with up to 75% of people having antibodies. And that´s just those developing countries I heard about.

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