Is sending mail registered / einschreiben a provocative act?

16 posts in this topic

This is going to sound weird... somewhere between etiquette and formality, and not wanting to be the one to rock the boat.

 

Anyway, if you send mail to a business / govt dept you've never been in contact with, and they would be the one doing you a favour / helping you out, would they consider it rude / provoking that you sent the letter as registered mail per einschreiben?

 

For legal certainty, I would like to send the letter per einschreiben. I just don't want to get their backs up, and I've never needed to send a first contact letter per einschreiben before.

 

Presumably, though they don't have to sign for the letter, they'll still see the postman's mark on the envelope it was per einschreiben.

 

Is the mere act of sending registered seen as provocative?

 

I'm probably overthinking this - maybe it's covid loneliness paranoia :-) 

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You're probably overthinking this, but someone may beg to differ. 

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4 hours ago, catjones said:

the letter's content defines provocation; not register mail.

 

I agree.

 

For an office, registered mail is no big deal because whoever gets the mail will sign for it regardless of who the thing is addressed to.  It's not like sending a letter to a neighbor who isn't home when the Postfrau comes and then the neighbor just gets a postcard telling them to go somewhere and sign for some letter they didn't want anyway.

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I reckon, if you are writing to a company with a staff of 20.000

then no one will notice.

 

A family business of 5 people may (only just may) consider it odd.

But hey, a line like "I have experiences of lost postal mail before" 

would be enough explanation.

 

Maybe we're overthinking...

 

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Could you get in contact with the receiver beforehand? Let them know a letter is on the way and you want to make sure you get it so you'll send it per Einschreiben "as some stuff has gotten lost recently" as @HH_Sailorsuggested

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Perhaps you should also apologize to the post office and ensure them you generally trust them to deliver mail, but that in this particular case you’d like to send it registered, please. 

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5 hours ago, DoubleDTown said:

It's not like sending a letter to a neighbor who isn't home when the Postfrau comes and then the neighbor just gets a postcard telling them to go somewhere and sign for some letter they didn't want anyway.

This would only happen if you request a signature upon delivery. You can send a registered letter that doesn't need one and it arrives with the rest of the post, - the only difference being it has been tracked and scanned during the journey.

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19 hours ago, paulwork said:

For legal certainty, I would like to send the letter per einschreiben.

Why don't you send a fax? You also get the delivery confirmation.

 

Deutsche Post used to provide this service for free with their E-Post website, but they discontinued it soon after I left Germany. However, I did manage to use the service in 2019 to remind my asshole bank that they owned me money left on my closed account, and they processed this fax much faster than E-Mail (the country of Luddites, what to do).

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On 19.11.2020, 15:02:59, lunaCH said:it has been tracked and scanned during the journey.


Actually the Einschreiben is only tracked at the beginning (when you bring it to the post office) and end (delivery day) of its journey.

 

In between it‘s treated like all other letters.

 

If you want full tracking then „Express“ is the way to go.

 

And if you only want peace of mind then the „Prio“ option for €1 more than regular postage is also available.

 

No insurance if it‘s lost, but you can see when it was delivered.

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1 hour ago, martinamr said:

And if you only want peace of mind then the „Prio“ option for €1 more than regular postage is also available.

No insurance if it‘s lost, but you can see when it was delivered.

The Einschreiben Einwurf now offers up to €20 insurance. The Einschreiben Standard up to €25. 

And AFAIK Prio only changes the speed of the delivery. Any letter can get lost. 

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2 hours ago, lunaCH said:

Any letter can get lost. 


Of course.

 

That‘s why I wrote „for peace of mind“, with Prio you know it‘s been delivered.

 

If your Einschreiben gets lost €20/25 won‘t recover the documents either in most cases.

 

But actually my point was that an Einschreiben isn‘t „tracked and scanned during the journey“, only at the start and end of it.

 

(I see now that the quoted text isn‘t shown in my earlier post.)

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4 minutes ago, martinamr said:

That‘s why I wrote „for peace of mind“, with Prio you know it‘s been delivered.

As far as I can see from the post office website https://www.deutschepost.de/de/e/einschreiben.html Prio is an optional extra which you add to a standard letter to speed up delivery and track it, but not valid (legal) proof of delivery. I must admit I had never come across Prio until today. You have peace of mind for say sending something to someone you know personally or for something local - but I wouldn't use it to send stuff which needs legal backing.  

 

The site says that Einschreiben Einwurf is valid proof of delivery - but this is not strictly true. 

For absolute peace of mind (in a legal sense) I think you really need Einschreiben Standard. This is the least expensive way of sending it where the recipient has to sign for it. 

 

Some may argue that Einschreiben Einwurf may be better as the recipient can't reject it. But it will depend on individual needs and circumstances really. 

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From a practical viewpoint:

 

A few weeks ago I had a customer who had sent paperwork to the Arbeitsamt via Einschreiben. The "Übergabe" kind.  It had arrived at the destination and was signed for, but her case worker hadn't received the contents of the letter (yet?).

 

So you have legal proof that you sent something, and that something was received, but bottom line it doesn't help get your case solved.

 

Back to the original question: for a few years I worked as a receptionist for a German company.  That included receiving, opening, and distributing mail.  Often people sent things per Einschreiben; I took note of this, but wasn't offended, and more often that not the final recipient had no idea as I disposed of the envelope before passing the mail on.

 

Other people wrote "per Einschreiben" above the address inside of the letter on the actual document but sent it as a regular letter.

 

So the person ultimately receiving it probably thought it had been an Einschreiben, but it wasn't.

 

And an interesting anecdote: a few of those Einschreibens were with a Rückschein, but the mailman forgot/didn't notice and handed over the entire envelope including the Rückschein and left.

 

So those senders never ever received the Rückschein.... but of course they had proof it was delivered as I had signed for it.

 

So if it's just to satisfy your personal curiosity of "have they received my letter?" I stand by my advice to consider using "Prio", which of course has no legal standing. But it gives you... peace of mind :-)

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