Flooring options for kellar

11 posts in this topic

Good morning,

I am looking for some easy to do, durable flooring ideas for cellar floor for a neubau with fussboden heating. Right now the floor has bare estrich and nothing else on it. I want to make it a smooth easy to clean surface.

My fall back option is ceramic tiles. But I am looking for ways to avoid it, because I will be doing this job myself. I like floor coating paints but somewhere in internet i read that they are not suitable to apply on floors with floor heating .

Advices and thoughts on it are very much appreciated.

Have a great sunday ,

 

Regards

Jj

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I just bought some vynyl click laminate from toom baumarkt... Its says on the package that its good for floor heating !!      Its easy to cut and to lay...   but deffinately a thin layer of foam/stypopur underneath!... 

 

But dont be afraid of tiles... if you get the big ones, its a pain to lay them all straight... if you get the "farmhouse style" small 10x10 then there is more to lay but my god is it easier!

 

 

This type of style...

https://www.hornbach.de/shop/Marmor-Travertino-chiaro-10-x-10-cm/7288202/artikel.html

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I read that Linoleum is suitable, of course check manufacturer's temperature guidelines. Modern linos are beautiful compared to the stuff of my childhood! And are made from mostly natural materials.

SP is expert in these matters though!

But just a question - if a fault develops in the underfloor heating, isn't it then a pain to have to remove ceramic tiles?

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5 minutes ago, Feierabend said:

 

But just a question - if a fault develops in the underfloor heating, isn't it then a pain to have to remove ceramic tiles?

 

And what about if a fault develops in the pipes of a conventional radiator served heating system?    In This country, all or atleast MOST of the pipes are plastered into the walls!!   

 

Except... At my place where they are all surface mounted so I can see if there is any water loss!  

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I also did not like fitting the tiles in the shower cubicle at my place last week... they were a bit on the heavy side, so fine adjustment was a right pain...

 

If you look in the TT blogs section you will see a link to my conversion... scroll down to the end to get an idea of the size I am talking about ( They are 1.8cm thick!!)   

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7 hours ago, Feierabend said:

I read that Linoleum is suitable, of course check manufacturer's temperature guidelines. Modern linos are beautiful compared to the stuff of my childhood! And are made from mostly natural materials.

SP is expert in these matters though!

But just a question - if a fault develops in the underfloor heating, isn't it then a pain to have to remove ceramic tiles?

Thanks for the reply, . If there is a fault, well I'm doomed already, since I have some design boden glued in ground floor. 

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On 18/10/2020, 10:49:34, SpiderPig said:

I also did not like fitting the tiles in the shower cubicle at my place last week... they were a bit on the heavy side, so fine adjustment was a right pain...

 

If you look in the TT blogs section you will see a link to my conversion... scroll down to the end to get an idea of the size I am talking about ( They are 1.8cm thick!!)   

I saw your work. Large tiles looked great with fewer joints.  Could you please tell me why did you choose that much thick ones?. 

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There are very few things that really need to "absolutely Spot on" in my barn, and the shower floor needed to be correct, so one of my friends did the under construction... I wasnt paying attention to him and He didnt do it to my Standard, so to avoid risk of any possibly movement, I used them thick buggers!!  So, Peace of mind and all that

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