Christmas traditions in Germany

59 posts in this topic

Chad, have you checked eBay? I've seen some there in the past. The price really depends on the quality, and the quality can vary a lot.

 

edit: also, try using a variety of English words to describe it, to get more hits. e.g. "carousel", etc.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@mlovett. Actually, I hadn't (no clue why). I just checked and there are a ton on Ebay. Thanks :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I'll see if I can shove it in there. :)

 

We've also got the Weihnachtspyramide going - I love them!

 

 

- I'm sure you can M! After all, Christmas is meant to be fun, isn't it?!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They had a giant pyramid at the Moers Christmas Market that was lit up, and with angels looking out. It was really cool!

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We're going to my mother-in-law's for Christmas Eve which means wiener hot dogs and potato salad. Now, I love many of the German Christmas traditions, but this one just boggles my mind!

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The crank-table is just what we used to have Christmas dinner on at my Oma and Opas house! I have to admit though, there was a lot less fighting and a lot less alcohol involved. In general, I quite liked Christmas at my grandparents, which was more about stuffing my face with nuts, Lebkuchen and Weihnachtsplaetzchen :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

coyote - that is a brilliant description of Christmas. We are at the outlaws Boxing Day. Forced smiles all round. I can't stand Christmas.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like to be in Germany at Christmas time. The snowfall... it's beautiful! Christmas markets are wonderful!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I lived in Canada, I loathed Christmas. To me, it seemed to just be about ugly, loud, tacky interior/exterior decorations, electric lights, the same shitty Christmas music sang by pop singers year after year, great big parking lots and shopping malls filled with loads of tired, aggressive shoppers, and this immense pressure to battle it out with them to buy the perfect, and usually expensive, gift. Then Christmas Day would roll around and my family would have a great big fight over Scrabble not too far away from the artificial Christmas tree and after eating the lumpy mashed potatoes and cranberry sauce still shaped like the can it came out of. And all of that combined with being a poor student working in a customer service job, -20 or -30 degree weather, and my general disinterest for the whole Christianity/Jesus/Mary manger story made me really dislike Christmas.

 

Then I moved to Germany, where I fell in love with the holiday. The Christmas markets are really the best. I mean what could be better than getting kind of pissed in the streets of a beautiful historic town square if you have to do xmas shopping anyway? Plus it is a great excuse to get a bunch of friends together. The gift giving here seems to be a little bit more low-key as well. Maybe I also fell in love with Christmas because when I arrived in Germany, I finally felt like I'd found the place where I was meant to be. I also met my partner in Germany and the holiday seems to be so much more enjoyable when he's around.

 

Now I'm in Istanbul and it's December first. Today there was sunshine and it was relatively warm. There are no Christmas decorations to be seen and Christmas will just be a normal work week here. Nothing really special. I won't make it back to Germany for Christmas Day because it is too complicated and I feel a bit sad about that. But, tomorrow I will be flying to Berlin to be with my partner and to go to the Christmas market at least once. All my Berlin friends will be coming and we are going to get together. This will be my Christmas this year. I can hardly wait for tomorrow.

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here in my neighborhood, we have a 'lebendige Adventskalender.' Twenty-four families sign up, and on each day there is a party in someone's driveway; since our entire neighborhood is a spielstrasse/fussgangerzone, it's OK that it spills into the street. The parties are scheduled to last for a half-hour, just enough time for a bit of small-talk and the kids love it.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did a search to look for Christmas traditions to write about our village and here's copywriter writing exactly what I was going to. It was our turn last Thursday - what a pain in the arse. Normally, we don't do any decorations since the children grew up and all left home but we had to for this. Spent two days decorating the porch and designing and building the number 11, which was our day. The wife went shopping for all sorts of nibbles and of course the glühwein. It starts at 6.00pm so at 4.00pm, the heavens opened up, sleet, rain, thunder and lightning. Luckily, it gave up by the time we started.

 

The procedure is that the village chief's wife passes around a printed Christmas carol booklet and welcomes the people to the householder's home. The householder then chooses four tunes, which are then sung. Just for a change, I printed up Silent Night in English and had them sing a verse followed by the German version. After that, everybody helps themselves to the fayre. I may sound like Scrooge but it is fun and creates a nice atmosphere in the village - once a year.

 

As a side note, we were walking home with the village chief. When we passed a house with some blinking coloured lights, he told me that that was not German - that is an Ami import. Lights should be without colour.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just had gluehwein and kekse in my lecture - brought by our lecturer. My first'nur im Deutschland' moment of the year, I have to say. :)

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Christmas tradition?

Collect lonely friends and neighbors for dinner and drinks.

And it's a no presents day, as I got sick of my family's rampant consumerism at a young age.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of my 28 years in Germany this will only be the 5th Christmas here. I'm staying at a friends hose in Frankfurt and we are having fondue on Christmas eve. On 25th or 26th I will be cooking a traditional English dinner, with turkey, stuffing, parsnips etc. Unforunately no Christmas crackers with crappy jokes. One thing I miss from an English Christmas is sitting down in a drunken stupor watching the Bond movies. :lol:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Of my 28 years in Germany this will only be the 5th Christmas here. I'm staying at a friends hose in Frankfurt and we are having fondue on Christmas eve.

 

Which reminds me. In one of these sing-song get-togethers, I learned that traditional Christmas dinner, in this area (maybe Germany), is sausages and kartoffelsalat. I burst out laughing, which of course was not polite, but I mean how could one not.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Which reminds me. In one of these sing-song get-togethers, I learned that traditional Christmas dinner, in this area (maybe Germany), is sausages and kartoffelsalat. I burst out laughing, which of course was not polite, but I mean how could one not.

 

I stand corrected. I've found out that Christmas dinner is actually the 24th and the reason for the simple meal is so that the cook doesn't spend the day in the kitchen. That's a bit more logical. However, I have a feeling that the cook is in the kitchen the whole of Christmas day. :(

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I first moved here, I tried desperately to do Christmas like the Germans do - everything on the 24th and a total let-down on the 25th.

 

Well, after a few years of really missing "my" Christmas on the 25th I found a solution - presents and cards from German friends and family on the 24th, and from English friends and family on the 25th. Of course, that was long before Shorty was even thought of, but since she has been around I have continued this "tradition" so that she gets the best of both worlds!

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now