Education and Autism- Areas of Germany to Consider?

32 posts in this topic

27 minutes ago, jeba said:

I have no idea about the Austrian system but if I was you and given that language is a criterion I'd look into it as well.

 

This is not out of the question but we would definitely prioritize going to Germany. I do not know any details about Austria beyond the language though so it would depend heavily on what living in Austria looks like. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can give it a try but from people I know, German school system seems to be the least inclusive. Kids seem to be ending up in special schools left and right for little cause.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, LeonG said:

You can give it a try but from people I know, German school system seems to be the least inclusive. Kids seem to be ending up in special schools left and right for little cause.

 

Is this based on personal experience? I'm just curious if you can elaborate some more or if this is just a general opinion of the school system. I have seen the comments on some negative experiences. I've also received multiple messages of support and encouragement with information that is helpful in guiding us to find a city to live in that will be great for us. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, mlynn said:

 

Is this based on personal experience? I'm just curious if you can elaborate some more or if this is just a general opinion of the school system. I have seen the comments on some negative experiences. I've also received multiple messages of support and encouragement with information that is helpful in guiding us to find a city to live in that will be great for us. 

 

Not personal no but I had a coworker whose son ended up in special school basically for having a limp. He asked repeatedly if there was some other solution and they said no. Another co-workers son ended up in special daycare and later in special school for having a lisp.  A friend's son is currently being held back a year from starting school because they feel his German is lacking. The parents have never spoken anything other than German to him and he's been in a German daycare since he was two. He's supposed to spend a year in special daycare now and see if he can go to regular school next year.

 

I'm sure there are areas that are better. These kids were all in Niedersachsen but all different school districts.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LeonG said:

 

Not personal no but I had a coworker whose son ended up in special school basically for having a limp. He asked repeatedly if there was some other solution and they said no. Another co-workers son ended up in special daycare and later in special school for having a lisp.  A friend's son is currently being held back a year from starting school because they feel his German is lacking. The parents have never spoken anything other than German to him and he's been in a German daycare since he was two. He's supposed to spend a year in special daycare now and see if he can go to regular school next year.

 

I'm sure there are areas that are better. These kids were all in Niedersachsen but all different school districts.

 

Thank you! That's really helpful. Those are really difficult experiences, I'm sure. Thank you for sharing the area these instances occurred so we can be aware. Niedersachsen isn't an area we are currently considering moving to. But still, it's good to know so we don't arrive entirely unaware! 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in Berlin, with a son with an ASD diagnosis. He went to  one of the (public) bilingual Europa schools here throughout primary school, is in Gymnasium now. Contrary to what previous posters suggest is the norm for Germany, there was never any suggestion he should be going to anything but a regular state school. In our case, as a parent one had a meeting with the school's Sonderpädagog and talked at length about the child's strengths, weaknesses, and requirements. Together we went through various likely scenarios, and discussed how they needed to be handled. And then that was essentially followed. There were occasional follow up meetings. Obviously he had different teachers over this period. Some were better than others, but I would say that is down to age/personality/experience of the teacher, and not something that can be influenced by which state or city in Germany you are in.

The Gymnasium he is in does not have a Sonderpädagog (as far as I know). There are occasional meetings with teachers (I think there were five over the last two years). A couple early on had most of his teachers, and was for going through what his specific requirements were, once that was sorted out they gave me in writing what specifically would be done differently for him. The other meetings were smaller, with the Klassenlehrer and more for feedback. All in all I'd say they've been pretty good.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I'm so happy to read about your positive experience! I've heard this from a couple other people (not on here) as well. So it's encouraging now to have a handful of positive experiences to look to. 

 

1 hour ago, anzu said:

In our case, as a parent one had a meeting with the school's Sonderpädagog and talked at length about the child's strengths, weaknesses, and requirements. Together we went through various likely scenarios, and discussed how they needed to be handled. And then that was essentially followed. There were occasional follow up meetings.

 

I'm happy to hear this as well. It's good to know that the school and teachers were meeting with you when necessary to determine what support might be needed. 

 

Quote

Obviously he had different teachers over this period. Some were better than others, but I would say that is down to age/personality/experience of the teacher, and not something that can be influenced by which state or city in Germany you are in.

 

Yes! I think we've all had some great teachers and some not so great teachers. It's a good thing that not every teacher is exactly the same. And while it can be difficult sometimes to have a teacher that maybe doesn't mesh well with you or your child, this is certainly a part of life. We interact with all kinds of people in life and can't avoid that. 

 

Quote

The Gymnasium he is in does not have a Sonderpädagog (as far as I know). There are occasional meetings with teachers (I think there were five over the last two years). A couple early on had most of his teachers, and was for going through what his specific requirements were, once that was sorted out they gave me in writing what specifically would be done differently for him. The other meetings were smaller, with the Klassenlehrer and more for feedback. All in all I'd say they've been pretty good.

 

It's also encouraging to hear that these meetings, even if only occasionally, continued. In my own experience in the US we have one official meeting at the beginning of the school year to discuss any areas where my son my need support. From there the only meetings that take place are if I request one or if my sons needs were to suddenly drastically change, which hasn't happened.  Otherwise you might get an occasional email if it's important or something happened that might need to be addressed but that was pretty rare. 

 

I'm happy to hear about your positive experience though! 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, mlynn said:

 

True. You didn't. But the comparison in question is the US and Germany. Not Italy. I did mention Italy is not an option. I am not trilingual and therefor don't speak Italian. I have never had an interest in living in Italy. I am a German citizen though. 


Are you aware that in some Alpine regions of Italy German is not only the prevalent language, but even co-official with Italian and the language of instruction in school? 

And I am not just talking about some remote hamlets in Tirol or the Dolomites. Bolzano, for example is a great bilingual town. I really wouldn’t mind living there and it looks to me like a great place to raise children. 
 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Smaug said:


Are you aware that in some Alpine regions of Italy German is not only the prevalent language, but even co-official with Italian and the language of instruction in school? 

And I am not just talking about some remote hamlets in Tirol or the Dolomites. Bolzano, for example is a great bilingual town. I really wouldn’t mind living there and it looks to me like a great place to raise children. 
 

 

That is really interesting though! I have always assumed that where one country borders another there may be a different common language, just as there are very different dialects in different parts of Germany. I'm sure they are great places to live. I don't doubt that.

 

If you are trying to convince me on Italy, I just don't know enough about it to consider moving there. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Smaug said:

Are you aware that in some Alpine regions of Italy German is not only the prevalent language,

True. Until after WW I Südtirol was part of Bavaria and they speak German to this day.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, jeba said:

True. Until after WW I Südtirol was part of Bavaria and they speak German to this day.

 

Surely Tyrol was returned to Austria much earler, in 1814?.  And from Austria  to Italy after WW1.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, snowingagain said:

 

Surely Tyrol was returned to Austria much earler, in 1814?.  And from Austria  to Italy after WW1.

I stand corrected. Sorry, it´s just further proof of how miserable the German education system was already 50 years ago.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now