Education and Autism- Areas of Germany to Consider?

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I’m curious if anyone has experience with autism and education in Germany. In particular I am looking for POSITIVE experiences and areas of Germany where people have had positive experiences. 

 

My son is going in to first grade now but he would be going into second grade by the time we move. It’s super important to know my son does not receive any academic support in school. He is very intelligent and is at the same level or beyond his peers in each of the core subjects. 

 

He is learning German so this isn't really a concern. He'll likely need some time to become fluent but I have no concerns about him learning the language. He is mostly in the listening phase of learning but he has been starting to describe familiar objects with short sentences.

 

He does currently receive about 10 minutes per day to work on social skills that consists of him playing games and talking to another kid. This could be supplemented outside of school so we don’t require this in a German school. 

 

He speaks VERY well with a large vocabulary and will gladly have detailed, lengthy conversations with you. This is great but also means he will attempt to persuade you out of things he does not like to do with solid reasoning. In school this mostly shows up in tasks he has already mastered and no longer wants to practice or in entirely unfamiliar tasks. He needs a teacher who doesn’t bend the rules for him. Of course, that takes a lot of patience but that is really important for him. 

 

His biggest struggles are in the fact that he is a RULE FOLLOWER. He will hear your instructions, rules, or outline/schedule and expect that to be how things go. In this way school has been great for him because the day flows in a particular order. Lessons happen in a predictable way. The problem is more when something unexpected happens/major change in routine. This can be prevented by saying “today we have an assembly instead of our reading lesson" or whatever change it is. So he knows ahead of time. I mention this because it's a simple things that can help him in the day that doesn't technically fall under "extra support" but is something that is helpful.

 

The MOST important thing he needs in school is a teacher that cares about him and is strict in the sense that they won’t bend the rules (of school work and things like that) for him.

 

So, with this knowledge, are there areas of Germany that are maybe more suited to accepting him in schools?

 

Will school be a non-issue because he does not require academic support? Or will we encounter problems trying to enroll him in school?

 

Does the diagnosis alone cause a problem where we then need to prove his abilities? 

 

Private schools and international schools are not an option.

 

I did have some recommendations to look at areas with better inclusion rates so that should the need arise for extra support this can happen within the regular school. This way we can apply for inclusion, even if that just means they help him with giving him a schedule so he knows what to expect and can tell him about any upcoming changes in routine for the week. In Google searches I found that Bremen, Hamburg, Schleswig-Holstein might be areas to consider? What do you think?

 

Thanks for any info you can provide on your experience or any advice! 

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One of the ways kids are sometimes supported in school here is with an Integrationshelfer - my kid#2 had one for CAPD and his needs were very different, but there was a group of autistic kids who shared a helper -from a short conversation with the dude some years back, it seemed that his main job was to negotiate with the teachers concerned and remind them of the child's needs and appropriate strategies, and only spend time working with a group of kids where that was necessary - in your son's case that might be relatively straightforward and perhaps involve regular visits rather than a classroom presence.

 

The helpers in our area are administered through the local Paritätische Dienst - you would need to find out how that works in regions you are interested in - here, the town/regional paediatrician visits the child at school to ascertain need, then generates the paperwork, presumably informs the Dienst that an assistant is required, and a helper is assigned. Flash to bang about 2 months for us, I think.

 

Otherwise, that system aside, trying to assess system-wide here is really hard. Heads are Emperors, teachers are monarchs within their own tiny kingdoms. There is little school unity, and the individual teacher is much more important than anything else. Funnily enough, I have heard only negative things about Hamburg and the schooling, and some quite positive things about some forward thinking schools in NRW. Bavaria is held as the educational gold standard, and my kid#1, who took part in a summer camp for swots (as her siblings put it) can confirm that the maths/physics kids got together one evening for a spot of light exam-comparison, and found that the Bavarian exams are definitely harder, and any idiot can do well in NRW :)

 

Trouble is the whole thing is so subjective - I hear much whinging from Brits about the late start here compared to the UK, even though that really is a dead duck, and barely anyone thinks formal schooling aged 4 is cool.

 

As to whether a diagnosis will give you hassle - I have honestly no idea. We get sad stories on here on this sort of theme, many from Americans, but I get the feeling from reading that the bigger problem is an, 'I can win this fight, no matter what!' attitude, which is a highly aggressive, shoot first policy which isn't a good way to influence people and get the best for your child.

 

Your post reads much more 'appropriate intervention' and so I think you have every chance of negotiating with a school - and from what you have said, they are not being offered a lame duck, just one who requires clear boundaries which are fixed or explained, which to be fair most kids are better with.

 

I wish you all the best - I would recommend my area and school, but there has been a change of head (not for the better, sadly) and also although beautiful, I live in a one horse town, near Hannover, and it is not ripe with opportunity for international incomers. Kids#2&#4 did have the Best Teacher Evvah, but she is now with 2nd class, so won't be starting a fresh bunch until 2022.

 

 I think you'll be OK, though, really.

 

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30 minutes ago, kiplette said:

One of the ways kids are sometimes supported in school here is with an Integrationshelfer - my kid#2 had one for CAPD and his needs were very different, but there was a group of autistic kids who shared a helper -from a short conversation with the dude some years back, it seemed that his main job was to negotiate with the teachers concerned and remind them of the child's needs and appropriate strategies, and only spend time working with a group of kids where that was necessary - in your son's case that might be relatively straightforward and perhaps involve regular visits rather than a classroom presence.

 

The helpers in our area are administered through the local Paritätische Dienst - you would need to find out how that works in regions you are interested in - here, the town/regional paediatrician visits the child at school to ascertain need, then generates the paperwork, presumably informs the Dienst that an assistant is required, and a helper is assigned. Flash to bang about 2 months for us, I think.

 

Otherwise, that system aside, trying to assess system-wide here is really hard. Heads are Emperors, teachers are monarchs within their own tiny kingdoms. There is little school unity, and the individual teacher is much more important than anything else. Funnily enough, I have heard only negative things about Hamburg and the schooling, and some quite positive things about some forward thinking schools in NRW. Bavaria is held as the educational gold standard, and my kid#1, who took part in a summer camp for swots (as her siblings put it) can confirm that the maths/physics kids got together one evening for a spot of light exam-comparison, and found that the Bavarian exams are definitely harder, and any idiot can do well in NRW :)

 

Trouble is the whole thing is so subjective - I hear much whinging from Brits about the late start here compared to the UK, even though that really is a dead duck, and barely anyone thinks formal schooling aged 4 is cool.

 

As to whether a diagnosis will give you hassle - I have honestly no idea. We get sad stories on here on this sort of theme, many from Americans, but I get the feeling from reading that the bigger problem is an, 'I can win this fight, no matter what!' attitude, which is a highly aggressive, shoot first policy which isn't a good way to influence people and get the best for your child.

 

Your post reads much more 'appropriate intervention' and so I think you have every chance of negotiating with a school - and from what you have said, they are not being offered a lame duck, just one who requires clear boundaries which are fixed or explained, which to be fair most kids are better with.

 

I wish you all the best - I would recommend my area and school, but there has been a change of head (not for the better, sadly) and also although beautiful, I live in a one horse town, near Hannover, and it is not ripe with opportunity for international incomers. Kids#2&#4 did have the Best Teacher Evvah, but she is now with 2nd class, so won't be starting a fresh bunch until 2022.

 

 I think you'll be OK, though, really.

 

 Thank you so much for your thoughtful reply. This eases my nerves quite a lot. You make some really important points. I feel more confident that we'll have a positive experience finding a school and we will be able to make sure he too will have a positive experience. 

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7 hours ago, mlynn said:

Private schools and international schools are not an option.

Don´t rule them out prematurely. My kids were at a private Montessori school in Bavaria as well as at an international school. The Montessori school fees depended on your income and there were even a few parents who couldn´t afford to pay any fees and were given the option of working for the school instead (cleaning classrooms and schoolyard etc.). I also know of a single mother who´s kid at the international school and she had to pay no school fees because a certain percentage of places there had to be given to kids whose parents couldn´t afford them. At least that´s what she told me. I don´t know whether that was a decision of the specific school or whether it´s mandated by the state (which is subsidizing private schools with what it would cost to tech kids at public schools). If money was the reason you said "no" to private schools I´d suggest you make sure this was really an obstacle as big as you think.

At the Montessori elementary school there was an autistic child which was accompanied by an Integrationshelfer. Furthermore, they usually have 2 teachers per class (and class size is small anyway). Plus there are a lot of other benefits that come with the Montessori system.

 

 

 

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12 hours ago, jeba said:

Don´t rule them out prematurely. My kids were at a private Montessori school in Bavaria as well as at an international school. The Montessori school fees depended on your income and there were even a few parents who couldn´t afford to pay any fees and were given the option of working for the school instead (cleaning classrooms and schoolyard etc.). I also know of a single mother who´s kid at the international school and she had to pay no school fees because a certain percentage of places there had to be given to kids whose parents couldn´t afford them. At least that´s what she told me. I don´t know whether that was a decision of the specific school or whether it´s mandated by the state (which is subsidizing private schools with what it would cost to tech kids at public schools). If money was the reason you said "no" to private schools I´d suggest you make sure this was really an obstacle as big as you think.

At the Montessori elementary school there was an autistic child which was accompanied by an Integrationshelfer. Furthermore, they usually have 2 teachers per class (and class size is small anyway). Plus there are a lot of other benefits that come with the Montessori system.

 

 

 

 

 

There are multiple reasons I'm not really interested in private schools or international schools. I will say, I love Montessori and would be fine with that but it definitely depends on the school and teachers along with the fees. So far I haven't seen a single private school in Germany costing less than $10,000/year. While I'm an involved parent with my children's education, I don't see being able to also work at the school on top of full time employment and the other extra appointments that come along with autism (which happen regularly even though he doesn't receive extra support in school) as an option. It's a great option for those who can cover tuition in that way, but unless my full time employment is at the school (I work in education) and they provide a discount for working in the school, I don't see it being an option.  

 

As far as international schools go, I don't think it makes much sense since this isn't a temporary move. I'd rather my children be in school where German is the language spoken full time so they are immersed in the language as much as possible from the start.

 

I do appreciate your response and will continue looking into schools that might be a good fit, such as Montessori, especially if they offer scholarships or tuition is reasonable. 

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The Montessori and Waldorf schools here are not full fee paying as you would think 'private' schools are - I don't know what the arrangement is, there may well be someone @kato possibly who knows that stuff. @dstanners has a kid at one, maybe he would help. We used a Waldorf kiga for kid#1 but that was nearly 20 years ago and was only kiga for two years so I am not a good source of anything but the waffliest info.

 

They will be German schools.

 

There is a view in Germany that private schools are for people whose kids can't cut the German system. Not on TT, obviously, since many TTers choose to send their kids to those schools, because of language, or because they passionately hate the German system. No doubt other reasons too but those are mainly reflected here. So not using an International school is a very OK thing to do, and long term, I think you are right, a local school will be better.

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1 hour ago, kiplette said:

The Montessori and Waldorf schools here are not full fee paying as you would think 'private' schools are 

 I see! I'll have to search better and find out more. I don't know that Montessori would be the best option for my son but I'm still open to it. I'm also really familiar with Waldorf since one of my children went to a Waldorf school in his preschool years. 

 

1 hour ago, kiplette said:

There is a view in Germany that private schools are for people whose kids can't cut the German system. Not on TT, obviously, since many TTers choose to send their kids to those schools, because of language, or because they passionately hate the German system. No doubt other reasons too but those are mainly reflected here. So not using an International school is a very OK thing to do, and long term, I think you are right, a local school will be better.

 

This is really interesting to me! I can absolutely understand reasons for choosing an international school like only being there for a few years or for language, among others. But I'm glad to hear local schools will be a good choice and in general have a positive reputation in Germany. (Especially after reading too much negativity.) I've always thought of German schools as quite good. 

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2 hours ago, kiplette said:

The Montessori and Waldorf schools here are not full fee paying as you would think 'private' schools are - I don't know what the arrangement is, there may well be someone @kato possibly who knows that stuff.

 

Depends on the school and most importantly the state. In Baden-Württemberg for example Waldorf schools are explicitly subsidized by the state, while Montessori schools are formally standard schools and thus also receive subsidies. International schools by comparison are usually not subsidized by the state, and leverage their costs in full from parents. Depending on state tuition fees may also be legally capped, at least for schools that receive subsidies and/or are legally acknowledged replacement schools for public education. Usually there tends to be an income-dependent fee table as well.

 

With all private schools of "alternative" kinds look into the educational concepts for the individual school itself - just because School A and School B are both Waldorf schools doesn't mean they even remotely do the same thing.

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7 hours ago, mlynn said:

 I've always thought of German schools as quite good. 

Education systems are state-specific and therefore, the diffences between the states are huge. When I was of schoolgoing age e. g. graduates from schools of Hamburg

or Bremen were not automatically admitted to University in Bavaria because they didn´t fulfill the requirement of having been taught at least 2 foreign languages. So you need to look at each state separately.

6 hours ago, kato said:

International schools by comparison are usually not subsidized by the state

When my kids were visiting an international school (about 10 years ago) Bavaria subsidised them. At least that´s what I heard at a parent-teacher meeting in one of them. No idea whether that has changed.

 

It may be a good idea to consult the local "Schulberatungsstelle" and ask what they recommend. There are helpdesks which know the situation at the local schools and of course the system of the respective state (and as I said before these differ from state to state).

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15 hours ago, kiplette said:

are not full fee paying as you would think 'private' schools are - I don't know what the arrangement is

I've just finished a year on the Vorstand at my kids' Waldorf school here in NRW, so here's some up-to-date info. Generally speaking, 83% of the teaching costs are refinanced by the state here in NRW, with the remainder to be privately funded. That is largely because some of subjects in Waldorf schools aren't refinanced (including of course the notorious "eurhythmics", which is the one where they learn to "dance their names"). However, the 83% varies if the school decides to provide teachers in a way which the state considers "excessive". For example, in my kids' school we offer French from year 1, have a teaching assistant as well as a teacher in every class, and...(dramatic pause, but seriously it works)...a dog trainer: each class has a trained dog! Those roles are not entirely refinanced, and have to be privately funded. 

As for the cost to parents, there are a variety of funding models, but ours runs on the basis that parents will pay an average of €150 per child per month. I've spoken with various other Waldorf schools (in NRW and RLP) and the financial requirements are broadly similar.

For our school, some of us have agreed to pay above the average, whereas others pay less. A decision we took as a school was that no child would be refused a place purely on finances. However, we have long discussions with all prospective parents so that they are aware that there is a collective responsibility to achieve the "average", and that if too many parents think they can pay less, then the school will have to close. Other Waldorf schools depend on sponsors (either businesses or large donations from parents), but again, that was not something our school was keen to choose.

I know another nearby Waldorf school which has funding arrangements in place to enable parents to spread the costs. 

In addition to cost, there are other aspects about sending your child to a Waldorf school which you'd need to take into consideration: in particular, the amount of parent activity expected, but that's been covered in other threads. 

 

    

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8 hours ago, jeba said:

When my kids were visiting an international school (about 10 years ago) Bavaria subsidised them. At least that´s what I heard at a parent-teacher meeting in one of them. No idea whether that has changed.

 

Schools that offer IB as a non-formal degree path (i.e. International Schools certified for that) in Baden-Württemberg get basically their administrative costs refunded - ISS Stuttgart gets around one million Euro per year due to this, even if right on their tuition page they claim that they're not getting subsidized by the state.

 

 

1 hour ago, dstanners said:

However, the 83% varies if the school decides to provide teachers in a way which the state considers "excessive".    

 

In Baden-Württemberg it's 80% of the standardized cost of a pupil at a state school (full-time education) that a school can get if it offers standard curriculum leading to a formal degree - this explicitly includes Waldorf Schools. Since this is paid per-student the actual percentage relative to cost of course depends on how economical the school is run (e.g. class sizes).

 

In return for this subsidization for these schools tuition fees for parents are capped. They basically have to offer a 165 Euro package for low-income parents as well as the option of getting a "standard curriculum" package (no fancy extras) for 5% of net household income.

 

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I found that Bremen, Hamburg, Schleswig-Holstein might be areas to consider? What do you think?

 

The schools in Bremen consistently rank as the worst in Germany (the schools in Berlin are only slightly better). 

 

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but unless my full time employment is at the school (I work in education)

 

Since you are in the field, have you done a literature search yet? Perhaps @kato could link a few current studies on inclusion in the German school system as well as information on the availability and access to additional help (just because your child has the right to certain types of assistance does not mean that it is actually available) . 

 

Quote

I'm glad to hear local schools will be a good choice and in general have a positive reputation in Germany. (Especially after reading too much negativity.) I've always thought of German schools as quite good. 

 

What is your definition of good? The German school system generally (with the exception of certain Brennpunktschulen) does a decent job of educating German children who fit the "norm", however, foreign children as well as those with special needs have often fallen through the cracks.

 

Since you haven't decided on a location yet, have you considered Italy? If I had a kid with special needs I would do everything in my power to move to Italy, which has one of the best systems in the world to cater to different types of children.

 

If you are set on Germany, you should check out these sites as well:

 

https://www.autismus.de/recht-und-gesellschaft/rechtsratgeber-merkblaetter.html

https://ellasblog.de/autismus-und-schule-erfahrungen-aus-den-familien/

 

 

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41 minutes ago, engelchen said:

(just because your child has the right to certain types of assistance does not mean that it is actually available) . 

 

This is certainly true of the US as well. Schools often don't have the resources to provide things like a full time one-on-one aid when they are supposed to. Schools sometimes don't have staff willing to make changes within the school day for students who require it with things like extra time to complete tasks or even things like allowing a child to wear headphones (that do not play music) to decrease sounds levels that are overwhelming. Schools don't have the staff to dedicate to meeting every child's needs and many fall through the cracks. When speaking of Germany I find it interesting that a lot of people suddenly think it's all figured out in the US. The US has many places where education is just terrible. Trust me. I've lived in some of those places. 

 

 

43 minutes ago, engelchen said:

The schools in Bremen consistently rank as the worst in Germany (the schools in Berlin are only slightly better). 

 

 

Yes, I came across this as well. I'm wondering why there is this major discrepancy between their high inclusion rates and ranking within education in general. 

 

44 minutes ago, engelchen said:

What is your definition of good? The German school system generally (with the exception of certain Brennpunktschulen) does a decent job of educating German children who fit the "norm", however, foreign children as well as those with special needs have often fallen through the cracks.

 

In general the German education system is considered quite good. I'm sorry you have such a negative opinion of the German education system. It sounds like maybe you've had a really negative experience with the German education system.  

 

45 minutes ago, engelchen said:

Since you haven't decided on a location yet, have you considered Italy? If I had a kid with special needs I would do everything in my power to move to Italy, which has one of the best systems in the world to cater to different types of children.

 

We have not considered any location other than Germany because I am a German citizen. (I did not go to school in Germany though.) Certainly we could go to another country since being a German citizen gives us that ability to do so but this is not something we are considering at this time. Instead I am looking for positive experiences and advice on locations where people had positive experiences. 

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I believe the Uni Klinik in Munich has a specialist clinic focussed on Autism spectrum.

 Have you checked Autism support groups, International Autism  Group?  They  may have good links and suggestions. Engelchen has given some good links.

This is a tough time for you to  think of moving.

I have a relative in the UK diagnosed as Asperger. High functioning, and is doing well, with a lot of support, funding, school partner, and assisted living.

It has been a battle over the years,  and required strong assertive family.  From medical friends, I do not think Germany has quite the same infrastructure.

 When she attended European events, and met other groups from European countries ( including Germany),  family reported they did seem to have similar funding. 

 

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1 minute ago, RedMidge said:

 Have you checked Autism support groups, International Autism  Group?  They  may have good links and suggestions. Engelchen has given some good links.

 I have not but I have been searching for such groups to find out more information.

 

1 minute ago, RedMidge said:

This is a tough time for you to  think of moving.

 

Why is that? 

 

2 minutes ago, RedMidge said:

I have a relative in the UK diagnosed as Asperger. High functioning, and is doing well, with a lot of support, funding, school partner, and assisted living.

 

It sounds like your relative has a more severe diagnosis than my son considering he requires assisted living. It also sounds to me like maybe you either didn't read my post because you are mentioning your relative in the UK who requires a lot of support and a "school partner" which I assume means a one-on-one support person to be with this person during the school day. My son receives no extra support with academics. Assisted living is not in his future either unless something dramatically changes. But that is true for every single person on this planet. 

 

5 minutes ago, RedMidge said:

It has been a battle over the years,  and required strong assertive family.  From medical friends, I do not think Germany has quite the same infrastructure.

 When she attended European events, and met other groups from European countries ( including Germany),  family reported they did seem to have similar funding. 

 

You are correct. The system in place in Germany regarding special education is different than other countries. But again, my son doesn't require extensive support. In fact, he receives no extra support regarding academics. As far as requiring a "strong assertive family" I would say it is most definitely important for anyone to advocate for their child with special needs, no matter where they live. This can be difficult, daunting, and frustrating at times but that is true of life anywhere with special needs. You've pointed out the needs of your family member in the UK.

 

Here in the US, children with special needs require just as much advocating. And often times they are left behind for many reasons. Maybe because they don't have access to an occupational therapist because they live in a rural area. Or the school system has failed them and doesn't care to provide the support needed/required. Or maybe they spend years waiting for diagnosis, with more months and more years on waitlists to access support. Or maybe they struggle because health insurance won't cover therapy or won't pay for the wheelchair they require or health insurance decides they know best and won't cover a life changing medical procedure. Not to mention the thousands and thousands of dollars families spend on medical care for their special needs children per year. Sometimes families are spending thousands of dollars per months because health insurance won't cover their care. And then if they require assisted living for that child when they reach adult-hood they might spend years on waitlists to get into assisted living. But who is paying for that? It's not cheap. Or maybe they end up homeless. Germany is different but they do have some things figured out FAR better than the US. 

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56 minutes ago, mlynn said:

When speaking of Germany I find it interesting that a lot of people suddenly think it's all figured out in the US. The US has many places where education is just terrible.

 

Wait a minute! I never said anything positive about the American school system. I do not think it is great nor would I recommend it, however, I think overall it does inclusion better than Germany. For the record, I recommend Italy.

 

56 minutes ago, mlynn said:

In general the German education system is considered quite good. I'm sorry you have such a negative opinion of the German education system.

 

I'm not the only one. International studies as well as even most German Bildungswissenschaftler acknowledge that the system is not good, that is has systematically failed students with a foreign background as well as those with special needs, and needs to change. 

 

56 minutes ago, mlynn said:

It sounds like maybe you've had a really negative experience with the German education system.  

 

Fortunately, I only spent 3 months as an exchange student and was able to go home to obtain my high school diploma. My opinion is based on both academic studies as well as seeing the consequences of how the German system has failed.

 

56 minutes ago, mlynn said:

Instead I am looking for positive experiences and advice on locations where people had positive experiences.

 

As Kiplette already mentioned it depends on the teacher (and the one teacher she would recommend would not be teaching the right year for your child).

 

6 minutes ago, mlynn said:

But again, my son doesn't require extensive support. In fact, he receives no extra support regarding academics. 

 

No, but you stated very clearly that he requires personal attention in any situation where there is change to his routine, which makes class size rather important. You can't expect a teacher with over 26 kids to be able to have that much time just for your son.

 

6 minutes ago, mlynn said:

Germany is different but they do have some things figured out FAR better than the US.

 

I think you have an idyllic view of the German system. I would highly recommend joining German forums for parents of children with special needs so that you can learn more about the reality.

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7 minutes ago, engelchen said:

 

Wait a minute! I never said anything positive about the American school system. I do not think it is great nor would I recommend it, however, I think overall it does inclusion better than Germany. For the record, I recommend Italy.

 

 

True. You didn't. But the comparison in question is the US and Germany. Not Italy. I did mention Italy is not an option. I am not trilingual and therefor don't speak Italian. I have never had an interest in living in Italy. I am a German citizen though. 

8 minutes ago, engelchen said:

Fortunately, I only spent 3 months as an exchange student and was able to go home to obtain my high school diploma. My opinion is based on both academic studies as well as seeing the consequences of how the German system has failed.

 

I'm not really sure why you are commenting then on a post looking for positive recommendations of locations to live within Germany that do a better job than other areas. 

 

9 minutes ago, engelchen said:

As Kiplette already mentioned it depends on the teacher (and the one teacher she would recommend would not be teaching the right year for your child).

 

She mentioned her positive experience with one teacher but that certainly does not mean there is only one good teacher in Germany. That is really hurtful to all of the other, many, good teachers in Germany. 

 

10 minutes ago, engelchen said:

No, but you stated very clearly that he requires personal attention in any situation where there is change to his routine, which makes class size rather important. You can't expect a teacher with over 26 kids to be able to have that much time just for your son.

 

You expanded my comment into something I did not say. I said he needs a heads up with major changes in the routine. Typical changes like when it's time to change subjects, go to a different classroom, have a different teacher, are typical in the school day and become predictable. What I did mention was major changes in the day like the off day where there is an assembly or an early release or something like that. Announcing those changes to the entire class is pretty typical anyways and is actually good for all students at that age. It's not a special catering to my child every minute of the day. His teacher this past school year had no problems making sure to announce changes in the regular schedule. I mean, can you imagine a teacher NOT telling the class they would be having an assembly that day or that music class was cancelled for the day? No. They alert the class to those changes. 

 

Another things I said is a teacher that doesn't bend the rules for him. I would guess Germans in general would be in support of not bending the rules for one particular child. 

 

Never once did I say I expect a teacher to have time just for my son. Please don't make assumptions and say I said things that I did not. 

 

15 minutes ago, engelchen said:

think you have an idyllic view of the German system. I would highly recommend joining German forums for parents of children with special needs so that you can learn more about the reality.

 

Maybe. Or maybe I'm just pointing out that I've read enough the negative and I would like to hear some positives now. I don't need more negative stories and comments, especially ones that are based not in experience with autism in Germany but rather a 3 month exchange in high school.

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No- the diagnosis of relative is not as severe as you seem to think. Family have worked hard to get the support for 2 colleges, represented GB in special Olympics, won medals, uses transit, bank account and holds 2 part time jobs while finishing college.

Great thought and action to secure a stable future, and own apartment in house. Aim has been to bring independence and confidence.

Parents will not be around for ever!

Please take all comments, ideas. In the spirit intended. Moving is always a stressful time, and trying to research the resources for your son  increases the stress. If you feel some posts are not relevant,  most are also responding  through good will and support.

It is an open forum, and many good suggestions. Good luck.

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I have no idea about the Austrian system but if I was you and given that language is a criterion I'd look into it as well.

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29 minutes ago, RedMidge said:

No- the diagnosis of relative is not as severe as you seem to think. Family have worked hard to get the support for 2 colleges, represented GB in special Olympics, won medals, uses transit, bank account and holds 2 part time jobs while finishing college.

Great thought and action to secure a stable future, and own apartment in house. Aim has been to bring independence and confidence.

Parents will not be around for ever!

Please take all comments, ideas. In the spirit intended. Moving is always a stressful time, and trying to research the resources for your son  increases the stress. If you feel some posts are not relevant,  most are also responding  through good will and support.

It is an open forum, and many good suggestions. Good luck.

 

I know your response was with good intentions. I only bring up the differences because autism is a spectrum and there is a large variety in needs between children with this same diagnosis. The major difference being that you brought up your relative who has a need for assisted living of some sort. This is not my situation and does point towards differences in level of support needed which are not something I need to consider. Thank you for taking the time to consider my situation and offering your opinion.

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