Has anyone any experience of working in the UAE?

42 posts in this topic

1 minute ago, Mackle said:

If it were not for Brexit, I'd probably be thinking that I might as well give it 18 months and see what it is like. The loss of my right to reside in Germany once I have been gone for.. 6 months under the withdrawal agreement I think? - is what makes it a really difficult decision.

I think there will be people who will try to get around this by not notifying the authorities that they've left whilst maintaining an address here.

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16 minutes ago, lunaCH said:

I think there will be people who will try to get around this by not notifying the authorities that they've left whilst maintaining an address here.

 

In my case, that would mean having to continue paying rent, continue paying for health insurance, and I would presume having to submit tax returns (and pay German tax on my Dubai earnings?)

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9 hours ago, Mackle said:

 

In my case, that would mean having to continue paying rent, continue paying for health insurance, and I would presume having to submit tax returns (and pay German tax on my Dubai earnings?)

I doubt anyone who actually does this pays rent here for nothing, whilst they are away. Plenty of people maintain an address in a country where they don't actually live, for all sorts of reasons. A post office box would possibly suffice, or just receive your mail at a trusted person's address etc.

A storage room would be a fraction of the rent of an apartment if you're leaving stuff here too. 

As for earnings, you'll pay tax where you live, so in UAE. You'll effectively have legal residence in both countries without each one knowing about the other. Back here just declare your German earnings, if there are any in the year(s) in question. ;)

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Yes, but even if you register at a friends address and not pay rent you can't get around the health insurance. Just being registered in Germany does not make a you a resident. I'm on a Germans in Britain forum and lots of people find that out every year.  It's one thing to do this while flouncing around the EU as an EU citizen as no-one really cares as you (usually) have a right to be in the country anyway, but the moment non-EU (stupid Britain) comes into play they all bets are off. If for any reason you try this DO NOT ANNOUNCE IT PUBLICLY in a forum.

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3 minutes ago, Marianne013 said:

as an EU citizen as no-one really cares as you (usually) have a right to be in the country anyway, but the moment non-EU (stupid Britain) comes into play they all bets are off. If for any reason you try this DO NOT ANNOUNCE IT PUBLICLY in a forum.

This will only apple to new arrivals from 1.1.21 however, as anyone who arrived and registered legally right up until the end of the transition period will come under the old rules and will have secured their right to remain. Presumably at some point they are also going to get around to issuing the flipping documents to this effect so that one can also prove this on the spot. ;)

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Yes, but the right to remain can be rescinded. E.g. I have settled status in the UK, and I can be absent for 5 years before it gets rescinded, but it's not for life. The OP should probably check with someone legal what the actual limit is, maybe it's all a non-issue.

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26 minutes ago, Marianne013 said:

Just being registered in Germany does not make a you a resident. I'm on a Germans in Britain forum and lots of people find that out every year.  It's one thing to do this while flouncing around the EU as an EU citizen as no-one really cares as you (usually) have a right to be in the country anyway, but the moment non-EU (stupid Britain) comes into play they all bets are off.

 

I for one can't wait for the Germans to start systematically enforcing their own laws (as opposed to only sporadically) and putting a stop to the EU freeloaders.

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29 minutes ago, Marianne013 said:

Yes, but the right to remain can be rescinded. E.g. I have settled status in the UK, and I can be absent for 5 years before it gets rescinded, but it's not for life. The OP should probably check with someone legal what the actual limit is, maybe it's all a non-issue.

5 years is generous. I was under the impression that in Germany (but am happy to be told that my impression is wrong), if you're absent for more than 6 months (and have notified your departure) you lose all rights and have to start from scratch if you want to come back and Brits who try to come back after more than 6 months of being officially away will be under new rules from 1.1.21.

 

13 minutes ago, engelchen said:

I for one can't wait for the Germans to start systematically enforcing their own laws (as opposed to only sporadically) and putting a stop to the EU freeloaders.

What are EU freeloaders doing?

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On 7/9/2020, 4:15:43, catjones said:

 

I've done my share of travel and there are places I won't work in or travel to.  You can find injustice in Switzerland and have a great time in Libya, but I don't make my travel plans based on a newspaper article.

Depends. If you travel to the Middle East you better do read newspapers before: you don't want to end up in the middle of the war.

 

I have been to the border with Lebannon several times, the area is under Hezbollah control. On the lookout I could see cars moving, people living their lives. A peaceful and safe place it was. But a friend of mine who worked for Siemens was banned from going with me by his employer. Because, well, you can't exclude a sniper shooting at civilians from one of those posh houses...

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8 minutes ago, yourkeau said:

 you can't exclude a sniper shooting at civilians from one of those posh houses...

The houses were financed by the EU (or NGO's)?

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8 minutes ago, AnswerToLife42 said:

The houses were financed by the EU (or NGO's)?

I can't answer this question since obviously I can't travel there (not via Israel, at least).

 

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7 hours ago, Marianne013 said:

Yes, but the right to remain can be rescinded. E.g. I have settled status in the UK, and I can be absent for 5 years before it gets rescinded, but it's not for life. The OP should probably check with someone legal what the actual limit is, maybe it's all a non-issue.

 

If I had been in Germany for five years, and had been given whatever ends up being introduced to cover the withdrawal agreement, then this would also be the case (once Germany decides upon how to implement the W.A.).

 

But as I have only been here for 2.5 years, I only get 6 months grace.

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25 minutes ago, Mackle said:

There is a draft law that grants a new status of "alt Britisch" to those already here and charges nearly €30 for a card that confirms that status

I am wondering if that law will become valid and what sort of documents they'll require as well.

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9 minutes ago, lunaCH said:

I am wondering if that law will become valid and what sort of documents they'll require as well.

 

Its apparently going to be a declaratory system so possibly less than with most things  

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On 7/14/2020, 9:00:03, lunaCH said:

I think there will be people who will try to get around this by not notifying the authorities that they've left whilst maintaining an address here.

 

On the Wundertax.de site, it seems to suggest that if you rent a second home to be closer to work, that if the second home is in a different country it can be up to 60sqm2 and a thousand euros a month, and it is tax deductable.

 

Maybe that is how people do it?

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6 minutes ago, Mackle said:

 

On the Wundertax.de site, it seems to suggest that if you rent a second home to be closer to work, that if the second home is in a different country it can be up to 60sqm2 and a thousand euros a month, and it is tax deductable. Maybe that is how people do it? 

Surely that can only be for temporary situations though, where you continue to return every so often? My understanding was, regardless of nationality, if you're away for more than 6 months, you are meant to de-register entirely from your Gemeinde and are no longer a legal resident of Germany and thus are no longer tax resident either from that moment on. 

There might even be a rule stating how many nights you spend in Germany to qualify for residence, though quite how this could be checked properly I don't know.

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50 minutes ago, lunaCH said:

Surely that can only be for temporary situations though, where you continue to return every so often? My understanding was, regardless of nationality, if you're away for more than 6 months, you are meant to de-register entirely from your Gemeinde and are no longer a legal resident of Germany and thus are no longer tax resident either from that moment on. 

There might even be a rule stating how many nights you spend in Germany to qualify for residence, though quite how this could be checked properly I don't know.

 

What defines being away for six months though? If you are renting a place, continuing to pay health insurance, and your passport is badging in to the country every couple of months, then how is that different from the Swiss permit G holder who "forgets" to return back across the border to Germany once a week?

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14 hours ago, Mackle said:

What defines being away for six months though? If you are renting a place, continuing to pay health insurance, and your passport is badging in to the country every couple of months, then how is that different from the Swiss permit G holder who "forgets" to return back across the border to Germany once a week?

It depends on whether you notify the authorities of your departure or not. If you don't notify them, you remain a resident of Germany and as such a tax resident. 

 

You can continue renting a flat here whilst living elsewhere or you can give it up and redirect your post to somewhere else. Personally I would not keep paying rent on an empty flat whilst away when there are easier and far less expensive solutions. 

 

Passports aren't always 'badged in' - yes, they may be scanned sometimes in airports, but road and railway crossings have no such rigmarole in place, so there is no record of any arrival or departure. ;) 

 

Plenty of people who have their legal residence in Germany, but work in Switzerland on the G-permit 'forget' to return home once a week whilst they are meant to legally speaking - they are as such de facto residents of Switzerland. There's nothing much that either country can do about this really. 

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