Genossenschaftsanteile / Cooperative housing

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Does anyone here have any experience with buying shares in a cooperative project here in Berlin? I've been trying to find general guidelines on how much is required up front, but I can't seem to find any figures on this. It seems like a more affordable alternative to buying an apartment, and I'm trying to get a general understanding of how much a typical buy-in would be (eg €25K, €50K, €75K?) but can't seem to find anything on that front. Any insight would be much appreciated.

 

 http://www.urbancoopberlin.de/mitmachen/faqs/#

 

https://www.cohousing-berlin.de/en

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I am a member of one, neither of the ones you posted, though.  The buy-in for our Genossenschaft is per room and is more like a few hundred euros per room.  So you're looking at more like €600-€1200. YMMV

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37 minutes ago, dessa_dangerous said:

I am a member of one, neither of the ones you posted, though.  The buy-in for our Genossenschaft is per room and is more like a few hundred euros per room.  So you're looking at more like €600-€1200. YMMV

 

Dessa, I think you and @Fritsen are talking about two different things. I'm in a few Genossenschaften like yours where they already have buildings, you become a member, and then try to get a free apartment.

 

The projects to which Fristen linked are new Genossenschaften that are trying to buy land and then build, which requires much more capital.

 

 

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Thank you both! I wasn't aware there was a difference, to be honest, so that's great to know, especially since the costs @dessa_dangerous mentioned are so much cheaper. I have heard it's extremely difficult to get into Genossenschaften, which seems to be the Berlin story for everything these days, but I was wondering if you would mind sharing any tips or insights you may have? Or if either of you have any links to the Genossenschaften (or just the names) you're part of? I really appreciate the info, thank you!

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21 hours ago, Fritsen said:

Thank you both! I wasn't aware there was a difference, to be honest, so that's great to know, especially since the costs @dessa_dangerous mentioned are so much cheaper. I have heard it's extremely difficult to get into Genossenschaften, which seems to be the Berlin story for everything these days, but I was wondering if you would mind sharing any tips or insights you may have? Or if either of you have any links to the Genossenschaften (or just the names) you're part of? I really appreciate the info, thank you!

An acquaintance is in a Genossenschaft like the first one described. They got together and built a swanky building in Friedrichshain. Cost a boat load of money. For regular people, the second type is the best option. I found our current apartment on Immobilienscout24, but I think that’s an exception to the rule. I was talking to the neighbor downstairs, and she said they only had to wait eight months for an apartment to free up. 
 

Many Genossenschaften are inhabited by old people, and I mean oooold. My next-door neighbor just turned 91. Sooo basically the wait shouldn’t be that long to get in. Since having moved in, at least three neighbors have moved on to greener pastures 🥴

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On 7/8/2020, 7:30:06, Santitas said:

An acquaintance is in a Genossenschaft like the first one described. They got together and built a swanky building in Friedrichshain. Cost a boat load of money. For regular people, the second type is the best option. I found our current apartment on Immobilienscout24, but I think that’s an exception to the rule. I was talking to the neighbor downstairs, and she said they only had to wait eight months for an apartment to free up. 
 

Many Genossenschaften are inhabited by old people, and I mean oooold. My next-door neighbor just turned 91. Sooo basically the wait shouldn’t be that long to get in. Since having moved in, at least three neighbors have moved on to greener pastures 🥴

 

That is somewhat promising! Lol

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On 08/07/2020, 19:30:06, Santitas said:

I found our current apartment on Immobilienscout24, but I think that’s an exception to the rule.

 

The Genossenschaften normally only advertise to outsiders if no members are interested in an apartment and many are no longer accepting new members.

 

On 08/07/2020, 19:30:06, Santitas said:

Many Genossenschaften are inhabited by old people, and I mean oooold. My next-door neighbor just turned 91. Sooo basically the wait shouldn’t be that long to get in.

 

That was not my experience when looking for an apartment last year. 

 

When I went to hand in my Wohnungsgesuch last year in March looking for an apartment for the end of the summer, one woman at a Genossenschaft pretty much told me I had no chance (and was extremely unpleasant). Another had an extra document I needed to sign acknowledging that it could take up to 10 years for them to offer me an apartment (although 10 years seems to be just for certain popular housing projects). I'm glad that I ended up joining so many because the ones I'm in are not taking new members at the moment. 

 

@Fritsen if you are willing to live in Marzahn Hellersdorf Grüne Mitte had many apartments last year.

 

 

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1 hour ago, engelchen said:

 

 

The Genossenschaften normally only advertise to outsiders if no members are interested in an apartment and many are no longer accepting new members.

 

 

That was not my experience when looking for an apartment last year. 

 

When I went to hand in my Wohnungsgesuch last year in March looking for an apartment for the end of the summer, one woman at a Genossenschaft pretty much told me I had no chance (and was extremely unpleasant). Another had an extra document I needed to sign acknowledging that it could take up to 10 years for them to offer me an apartment (although 10 years seems to be just for certain popular housing projects). I'm glad that I ended up joining so many because the ones I'm in are not taking new members at the moment. 

 

@Fritsen if you are willing to live in Marzahn Hellersdorf Grüne Mitte had many apartments last year.

 

 

Wow, really?? Incredible!

You‘re right about them going external when no one external wants the apartment though. That’s what happened to the last two vacant apartments in our building. 
 

We‘re thinking of moving though and called two different Genossenschaften last week and described what we were looking for, and although they were super friendly, they said we’d have a 5+ year wait 🤷🏿‍♀️🤷🏿‍♀️ They didn’t mention anything about signing a document or not taking new members, but it probably has a lot to do with location and the housing project you

mentioned. These two were in Reinickendorf/Tegel. 
 

Are you looking for something in particular? We’re in a two-room apartment in a Neubau and pay 800€ warm, which is unheard of in our area where the going rate is about 2,000€. Perhaps send me a PM if you want more details. Or perhaps you’re already in our Genossenschaft 🤷🏿‍♀️

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On 12/07/2020, 21:45:06, Santitas said:

We‘re thinking of moving though and called two different Genossenschaften last week and described what we were looking for, and although they were super friendly, they said we’d have a 5+ year wait 🤷🏿‍♀️🤷🏿‍♀️

 

If you like the area it might be worth considering joining another Genossenschaft and putting yourself on the waiting list; most Genossenschaften decide based on length of membership. 

 

Another option is to find out whether your Genossenschaft will let you swap. Some people advertise their really cheap apartments for swap, but it is difficult to find a good match.

 

On 12/07/2020, 21:45:06, Santitas said:

They didn’t mention anything about signing a document or not taking new members, but it probably has a lot to do with location and the housing project you mentioned.

 

Only one Genossenschaft was honest enough to be so upfront regarding the waiting times before they took my money.

 

 

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3 hours ago, engelchen said:

 

 

If you like the area it might be worth considering joining another Genossenschaft and putting yourself on the waiting list; most Genossenschaften decide based on length of membership. 

 

Another option is to find out whether your Genossenschaft will let you swap. Some people advertise their really cheap apartments for swap, but it is difficult to find a good match.

 

 

Only one Genossenschaft was honest enough to be so upfront regarding the waiting times before they took my money.

 

 

Yeah, we’re planning on doing just that. Joining and then putting ourselves on the waiting list.

 

Never thought about swapping apartments. I suspect our current Genossenschaft won’t let us do that though; however, it doesn’t hurt to ask. 
 

Don’t get me wrong; the Genossenschaften that we called we’re not very encouraging. They warned of a 5+ year wait, but they weren’t nasty/unfriendly. Curious that they were like that with you and still expected you to give them your hard-earned money and join 🤨 

Customer Service in Germany 🙄🙄

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