Huge rent bill after three years of letters from Meiterverehin were ignored by landlord

92 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, Eupathic Impulse said:

Many US tenants are on month-to-month leases, which is what they usually lapse into after about a year or so.  The rules vary from state to state.  

These laws vary not only from state to state, but city to city within a state. All manner of leases are available to accommodate the needs of both renters and landlords in any given market. Americans are generally much more mobile than Germans and so obviously we approach renting/owning/landlording differently. When a standard year long lease defaults to month-to-month it is generally because one party or the other desired it. I myself have been a renter who wanted that flexibility so that I could make a quick exit when the time was right. So it cuts both ways in terms of who it may benefit.

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45 minutes ago, BethAnnBitt said:

These laws vary not only from state to state, but city to city within a state. All manner of leases are available to accommodate the needs of both renters and landlords in any given market. Americans are generally much more mobile than Germans and so obviously we approach renting/owning/landlording differently. When a standard year long lease defaults to month-to-month it is generally because one party or the other desired it. I myself have been a renter who wanted that flexibility so that I could make a quick exit when the time was right. So it cuts both ways in terms of who it may benefit.


Three months isn’t really that much longer. 
 

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3 hours ago, Namu said:

Three months isn’t really that much longer. 

Unless the renter wants/needs a quick exit and doesn't want to get stuck paying extra rent for it.  And generally notice must be given by either party before the end of one calendar month.  So if a one year standard lease ends on May 31st, 20XX and no new lease is signed the ending lease date would actually default to July 30th.  Therefore, it's effectively always 1-2 months.  

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1 hour ago, BethAnnBitt said:

Unless the renter wants/needs a quick exit and doesn't want to get stuck paying extra rent for it.  And generally notice must be given by either party before the end of one calendar month.  So if a one year standard lease ends on May 31st, 20XX and no new lease is signed the ending lease date would actually default to July 30th.  Therefore, it's effectively always 1-2 months.  


yes, but still 1-2 months more isn’t the world. Remember in return a family with kids basically cannot get kicked out of an apartment neither can an old couple nor poor people. So I think the extra month or two of rent for the minority of people that are happy with a months notice is acceptable.

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14 hours ago, Eupathic Impulse said:

So if you hold a gun to my head and force me to sign something

 

14 hours ago, Eupathic Impulse said:

Many tenants have the threat of homelessness

 

14 hours ago, Eupathic Impulse said:

The buyer and the seller exist at odds,

 

14 hours ago, Eupathic Impulse said:

but most contesting tenants will eventually lose.

 

A persecution complex is a very real emotional disorder, but not to the patient.  They act on impulse.  They believe they are empathic, but they can get that wrong as well.

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2 hours ago, catjones said:

 

 

 

 

A persecution complex is a very real emotional disorder, but not to the patient.  They act on impulse.  They believe they are empathic, but they can get that wrong as well.

 

lolwut

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On 6/12/2020, 6:19:07, franklan said:

There is no *must* to have legal insurance, liability insurance or being member of the Mietverein. 

 

There are millions of German tenants who have neither. 

 

It is just that the average foreigner doesn't know the laws, is prone to make stupid mistakes on unknown soil, and some landlords have the propensity to try to rip them off by abusing their language barrier.  

 

So, yes, I would recommend all three "safety nets" to anyone not being "saddle fast" with the local German laws and regulations.

 

 

Nothing. You'd probably have the same situation, if you - as an English speaking foreigner not being a native speaker of the local language - would move to Italy, Finland or Molwania.

 

Hereabouts, it is less rule- based. No Mietvereine here. Not even sure legal insurance exists.

When you rent here: usually no contract, no rent book, a bit of old furniture probably in there, a bed with an old mattress , an old, defective oven etc.. you do the place up at your own expense and the workers ( eg electricians, plumbers, carpenters do their stuff, get cash and don‘t provide receipts for their work or the materials they need to buy etc.)

Same rules apply if you buy a place!

We have been through all of this!🙏🏻

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Same as with the US tenants-related  posts?😀
Or the fact that I was relating to franklan‘s post about other countries? Plus comments by Catjones, Eupathic , Luke, SpaceCowboy etc.

I will wear my dunce‘s cap in the corner. 
And get down on my knees ever so humbly.

Is that the way this dying forum should work?

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To add more irrelevant posts: the notice period doesn´t have to be the same for tenant and landlord. The landlord may waive his right of termination in the lease contract. At least in Cyprus. My landlord can´t terminate my lease for another 19 years (breach of contract on my part aside). I think that would be possible in Germany as well (however such agreement would likely be invalid if it was to the disadvantage of the tenant).

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On 13/06/2020, 13:00:54, Eupathic Impulse said:

Some provinces of Canada have better protections than many US states.  Decades ago, I had friends in Toronto who lived in a student house owned by a notorious slumlady.  They had two years of hilariously dragging her before the Ontario rental tribunal where she lost every time.  However, it didn't make a whole lot of difference, the roof still leaked everywhere, she would rather suffer a rent reduction than do any repairs whatsoever...

 

The ace up the sleeve for landlords in Ontario is, like in Germany, the "family member is going to live there" clause. Also, if they plan to make renovations and upscale a place (Toronto is an ever-growing, ever-gentrifying city, and house flipping is common), the landlords usually win in the end. In that case, they can't turf tenants out immediately, but it's only a matter of time. It's called renoviction, and has become pretty notorious. Property developers run the show, IMO.

 

https://www.blogto.com/real-estate-toronto/2019/11/landlord-renoviction-applications-shot-almost-300-toronto-over-past-4-years/

 

Rocketing rent and property prices are one reason I'll never move back to TO, my hometown. There's no place like home, but even with a job that could cover expenses, I just don't think it's worth it. I know many who spend about 60-70% of their income on rent. Condos are overpriced (and deeply unattractive to me), while houses outright are out of reach even for average middle-classes. A million dollars or so for a house is not unusual. Condos maybe 500k to start (depending on size and location of course). My parents could sell their (our) home, but they probably wouldn't be able to buy something modern of the same size, and what they own isn't huge or anything. I just had a look out of curiosity, and I see more than one house selling for 1.5 million within a two block radius. In what used to be a lower-middle neighbourhood. I'm in my mid-30s, most of my friends back home are established professionals, but I don't know anyone who has bought a house in the city. A condo up to a certain size or a smaller house outside the city proper, those are the buying options unless you have a lot of money.

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Can they claim to have delivered mail to your mailbox? What if they just say that they delivered mail and you did not follow the instructions?  Usually they need to send warnings if they think I am overdue on the rent, but they have not. Can they say they did, but I did not respond? I have not received any mail like that. Plus, is it not that if I miss two months they can evict? How can they wait three years and then send a claim?  Is that even LEGAL?

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5 hours ago, alderhill said:

 

The ace up the sleeve for landlords in Ontario is, like in Germany, the "family member is going to live there" clause. Also, if they plan to make renovations and upscale a place (Toronto is an ever-growing, ever-gentrifying city, and house flipping is common), the landlords usually win in the end. In that case, they can't turf tenants out immediately, but it's only a matter of time. It's called renoviction, and has become pretty notorious. Property developers run the show, IMO.

 

https://www.blogto.com/real-estate-toronto/2019/11/landlord-renoviction-applications-shot-almost-300-toronto-over-past-4-years/

 

Rocketing rent and property prices are one reason I'll never move back to TO, my hometown. There's no place like home, but even with a job that could cover expenses, I just don't think it's worth it. I know many who spend about 60-70% of their income on rent. Condos are overpriced (and deeply unattractive to me), while houses outright are out of reach even for average middle-classes. A million dollars or so for a house is not unusual. Condos maybe 500k to start (depending on size and location of course). My parents could sell their (our) home, but they probably wouldn't be able to buy something modern of the same size, and what they own isn't huge or anything. I just had a look out of curiosity, and I see more than one house selling for 1.5 million within a two block radius. In what used to be a lower-middle neighbourhood. I'm in my mid-30s, most of my friends back home are established professionals, but I don't know anyone who has bought a house in the city. A condo up to a certain size or a smaller house outside the city proper, those are the buying options unless you have a lot of money.

 

Toronto is in danger of becoming like SF/Bay area -- which is totally unlivable if you aren't already securely rooted there, it's a struggle even if you make a six figure salary.  I also remember the New York "poor doors" in new buildings, for the part of the building that is merely for the highly-paid professionals, instead of the investment bankers who have access to the gym and rooftop pool.  I took a steep pay cut by not returning to the USA after crossing the ocean as I had planned to do, but I don't really regret it.  Even in the expensive German cities, it is despite everything still possible for someone with a decent education to live somewhat like a human.

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9 hours ago, fraufruit said:

Fair enough, john g.

 

I apologize.

Accepted without hesitance!🙏🏻 Thank you💋
The point is, many people renting in Germany and on this forum are by definition not Germans in most cases and bring with them their expectations of how it is where they come from  and are flummoxed by German laws/rules etc and some on this forum ( including lurkers ) may even be thinking about moving to another country and might be happy to get some pre-information.

Peace!🙏🏻

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25 minutes ago, solomongrundy said:

I hear he is planning to sue me. What should I do? I am a member of the Mitverehin but very broke. Life has thrown me a curveball, and I would really like your advice

Ask the Mieterverein whether they´ll represent you in court and whether that would cost you something. Hopefully you paid your membership fee.

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2 hours ago, jeba said:

Ask the Mieterverein whether they´ll represent you in court and whether that would cost you something. Hopefully you paid your membership fee.

Yes I did. Religiously. It s been more than four years

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If, and I don't know if this is the case, if you were a member before all this started, you should be covered by their legal insurance.

 

Your next steps are;

1). Go to the mietverein and check if you are covered by their legal insurance for this case.

(if they have been writing about this on your behalf then I guess you are, but check anyway).

 

2). Check what is covered in that legal insurance in regards to what could happen in this case.

(just court/lawyer costs, which costs etc, do you have to pay for travel to and form court etc. Do not assume anything is covered until they confirm it).

 

3) When you have that info, think what you can do next.

(you can always post it here if you think we can help).

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