Black BAME and POC supporters of Trump

568 posts in this topic

8 minutes ago, Tap said:

I agree with you Space Cowboy. My daughter has a friend who is black, she was born here, as were her parents, she is German.  She is often asked where she's from and when she answers Germany, they follow with "but where are you originally from?".  My daughter, who is very white, has never been asked this.

It is just ignorance but it may not be hateful. Again, it depends on the attitude. „ You are not from here so you are not welcome is NOT the same as where are you from?“

Tap- if I ask you what part of Ireland are you from? Is that racist or just curiosity because my daughter lived in Cork for four years?

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21 minutes ago, jeba said:

Where did he even talk about that?

Oh I`m sorry I didn`t realise to call him a racist that it had to have been something said in this thread specifically.

 

Stop trying on every thread to be devils advocate.It`s not working and you`re just showing yourself to be a wanker.

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34 minutes ago, Space Cowboy said:

I would respectfully disagree.  It is a very racist question when the implied OR PERCEIVED statement is, „You can’t be from here.“

 

And that even being FROM a place isn't enough.  So for me being American isn't enough, they want to know where I'm "really" from.  Then they want to know where my parents are from, no, where they're really from.  I don't know if it's "racist" but it definitely assumes that to be "from" a white majority country, you must either be white, or explain yourself and your entire fucking life story.  Highly irritating, ignorant, and yes, insulting.  I'm no less American than the next person whose parents, grandparents, great-grandparents and so on were born there, but because I don't look white, I'm less "from" there than other people.  Mmmkay

 

26 minutes ago, AlexTr said:

 

I carry it one step further. If the other person's German is better than mine, I just assume they're German. 

 

Or Polish!  Have met more foreign-born Poles with native-level German than any other nationality.  Maybe because they've already mastered one of the hardest languages in the world, everything else is a snap :lol: or their schools are better, no clue

 

12 minutes ago, Space Cowboy said:

 

Yeah, but Germans are unconciously racist.  I csn give examples - „Indianer,“. „Squaw.“. „Nafri.“

 

"südländer" :angry:

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2 minutes ago, dessa_dangerous said:

 

And that even being FROM a place isn't enough.  So for me being American isn't enough, they want to know where I'm "really" from.  Then they want to know where my parents are from, no, where they're really from.  I don't know if it's "racist" but it definitely assumes to "from" a white majority country, you must either be white, or explain yourself and your entire fucking life story.  Highly irritating, ignorant, and yes, insulting.  I'm no less American than the next person whose parents, grandparents, great-grandparents and so on were born there, but because I don't look white, I'm less "from" there than other people.  Mmmkay

 

 

Or Polish!  Have met more foreign-born Poles with native-level German than any other nationality.  Maybe because they've already mastered one of the hardest languages in the world, everything else is a snap :lol: or their schools are better, no clue

 

 

"südländer" :angry:

 

Once upon a time, I casually mentioned to my ex-wife‘s cousin‘s husband (a „true“ German from Schleswig-Holstein) that one of my remote ancestors was a Cherokee.  Ever since, he has greeted me with a war whoop and asked me why I’m not wearing my feather headdress.

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6 minutes ago, john g. said:

It is just ignorance but it may not be hateful. Again, it depends on the attitude. „ You are not from here so you are not welcome is NOT the same as where are you from?“

Tap- if I ask you what part of Ireland are you from? Is that racist or just curiosity because my daughter lived in Cork for four years?

I absolutely understand your reaction, I had the same when my daughter brought it up last weekend, but I see her point. My daughter has never been asked where she's from, mainly because she blends in with what is still considered to be the "norm" here in Europe. Her friend doesn't and is confronted with this question sometimes.

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Have you not just subconsciously  just fallen into the same trap, Space?  „ Germans are..etc.“

Indianer? Squaw? Isn‘t that from John Wayne movies rather than from Germans? 
I don‘t remember ever talking to a German using the word „ squaw“.

Not that there are not a bunch of Germans or other nationalities who are racist but maybe being a bit ethno yourself? Hm, wrong word.. maybe Euro- centric, America-centric or whatever? 
If people think they can get away without being asked where they are from as long as it is kindly meant, God help us..

 

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7 minutes ago, Tap said:

I absolutely understand your reaction, I had the same when my daughter brought it up last weekend, but I see her point. My daughter has never been asked where she's from, mainly because she blends in with what is still considered to be the "norm" here in Europe. Her friend doesn't and is confronted with this question sometimes.

I hope your daughter and her friend will live happy lives. And without prejudice. But it will not happen. There will always be bullying losers and there will always be those with more empathy or just „ hey, babe, where are you from?“

And if I end up in Japan one day, I reckon there‘ll be Japanese who ask me- „ where are you from?“

The way it is. It doesn‘t have to be a hateful question. Though it might be...

Power to those who are inquisitive but not hateful.

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33 minutes ago, dessa_dangerous said:

 

And that even being FROM a place isn't enough.  So for me being American isn't enough, they want to know where I'm "really" from.  Then they want to know where my parents are from, no, where they're really from.  I don't know if it's "racist" but it definitely assumes that to be "from" a white majority country, you must either be white, or explain yourself and your entire fucking life story.  Highly irritating, ignorant, and yes, insulting.  I'm no less American than the next person whose parents, grandparents, great-grandparents and so on were born there, but because I don't look white, I'm less "from" there than other people.  Mmmkay

 

Substitute Canadian for American and I've experienced the same and as far as I am concerned it is racist when people do not believe are honest answers based on our skin colour.

 

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51 minutes ago, Space Cowboy said:

 

Once upon a time, I casually mentioned to my ex-wife‘s cousin‘s husband (a „true“ German from Schleswig-Holstein) that one of my remote ancestors was a Cherokee.  Ever since, he has greeted me with a war whoop and asked me why I’m not wearing my feather headdress.

Do you really think people are any different re stereotypes anywhere else in the world?

I got married in Brazil to a Brazilian in 1978. I got on well with my sister-in-law! We were friendly to each other ( and I wasn‘t responsible for her love affair with her dentist! 😀).

There was an earthquake in Guatemala in 1979-ish. Brazilian TV reported the British Government had refused aid. Fake news ( as they say these days.)

You know what? My sister-in- law refused to speak to me for a few days! I was a „ British Imperialist!“
Stereotype. I was young. And not responsible for earthquakes or Govt shit.

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52 minutes ago, dessa_dangerous said:

Or Polish!  Have met more foreign-born Poles with native-level German than any other nationality.  Maybe because they've already mastered one of the hardest languages in the world, everything else is a snap :lol: or their schools are better, no clue

 

Probably Volksdeutsche. It's complicated history. Many Germans from way back emigrated to the east to Poland, Russia etc. in the same way many Germans emigrated to America. Over the centuries they kept their family names, culture and language alive. Then the war happened and ...  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volksdeutsche#'Volksdeutsche'_in_German-occupied_western_Poland. Many returned to Germany as did my former neighbours who were Volksdeutsche from Russia. They spoke perfect German but with an unfamiliar accent. 

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1 hour ago, Space Cowboy said:

 

Once upon a time, I casually mentioned to my ex-wife‘s cousin‘s husband (a „true“ German from Schleswig-Holstein) that one of my remote ancestors was a Cherokee.  

 

Many Americans seem to find it important to trace and stress their ancestry. Just look at all the Wikipedia entries of famous Americans. 

 

1 hour ago, Space Cowboy said:

Ever since, he has greeted me with a war whoop and asked me why I’m not wearing my feather headdress.

 

German humour maybe? Equivalent to Germans abroad having to bear the Lederhosen and yodeling joke?

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3 hours ago, john g. said:

Have you not just subconsciously  just fallen into the same trap, Space?  „ Germans are..etc.“

Indianer? Squaw? Isn‘t that from John Wayne movies rather than from Germans? 
I don‘t remember ever talking to a German using the word „ squaw“.

 

 

 

Yeah,no.  That was from a flyer advertising a „Western“ horse show in a town outside of Frankfurt.

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1 hour ago, bramble said:

 

Many Americans seem to find it important to trace and stress their ancestry. Just look at all the Wikipedia entries of famous Americans. 

 

Sure.  Lots of people I know in the US say, „I‘m German“ or, „I‘m Polish,“ even though their family has been in the US for 200 years.  It‘s fine to be proud of your heritage.  No one makes fun of that, or asks, „Where are you REALLY from?“ as @dessa_dangerous described.

 

1 hour ago, bramble said:

 

 

German humour maybe? Equivalent to Germans abroad having to bear the Lederhosen and yodeling joke?

 

I am embarrassed when my fellow compatriots think that all Germans are Bavarians.  I am equally embarrassed when they act as if we are still living in a WWII movie.  Is it more humorous when Germans do the same?

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16 hours ago, Dr Jock said:

Why shouldn't they support Trump? he´s the best president you've had since Ronald Regan.

Isn´t there a thread of it´s own for jokes?

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10 hours ago, Space Cowboy said:

Yeah, but Germans are unconciously racist.  I csn give examples - „Indianer,“. „Squaw.“. „Nafri.“

What´s wrong with Indianer? And I´ve never heard anyone talking of squaw and can only guess what Nafri means. And I´m German, born and raised in Germany and have lived there for 50 years.

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7 hours ago, Space Cowboy said:

Sure.  Lots of people I know in the US say, „I‘m German“ or, „I‘m Polish,“ even though their family has been in the US for 200 years.  It‘s fine to be proud of your heritage.

 

What I meant was, that many Americans have strains of all sorts of heritages in one single person or family due to American history and it seems to be quite important to them. I think a lot of it is gueswork. Why is it important to state that one has Swedish, German, Italian or whatever heritage after a few hundred years of being American? It means nothing because we Europeans or also a mixture of many generations of invasions, conquests, displacements, expulsions etc. from way, way back in history. 

 

7 hours ago, Space Cowboy said:

 No one makes fun of that, or asks, „Where are you REALLY from?“ as @dessa_dangerous described.

 

Are they really making fun? I think they are simply being obtrusively curios. Bad manners.

 

7 hours ago, Space Cowboy said:

I am embarrassed when my fellow compatriots think that all Germans are Bavarians.  I am equally embarrassed when they act as if we are still living in a WWII movie.  Is it more humorous when Germans do the same?

 

Maybe I should have said cringeworthy German humour.

 

My daughter-in-law is from the Philppines and she has a gorgeuous 3 year old daughter, who looks just like her. Yet from birth she keeps looking for signs of European looks in her - my family is very fair. But I think that's an Asian thing. I tell her she's beautiful the way she is.

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21 minutes ago, bramble said:

I think they are simply being obtrusively curios. Bad manners.

It wouldn´t even be bad manners in my book.

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11 hours ago, jeba said:

I also disagree - but with you. I´m asked that often, e. g. at the gym and it wouldn´t occur to me that it could be unpolite.

 

If you look different and you do not speak the local language, I would consider it a normal question.  But if you look different and you speak the local language perfectly with the correct accent, then why they must assume you are foreigner because of your looks?

 

There are plenty of very blond brazilians with European background, I can assure you no one in Brazil ever ask them where they come from meaning they couldn't be brazilians, even if they had unpronounceable German last names.

 

 

P.S., Many years ago I worked in a project in Argentina and the project manager had a complicated German last name, difficult to pronounce for Spanish speakers, something with W, like Wohlgemuth, or Wullenweber, or something like that.  Everyone called him "Doble-u-punto", double-u-dot, (W.), but no one doubted his Argentinianness. 

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2 minutes ago, Krieg said:

If you look different and you do not speak the local language, I would consider it a normal question.  But if you look different and you speak the local language perfectly with the correct accent, then why they must assume you are foreigner because of your looks?

Because you stand out if you´re looking different from 95% of the remaining population so the odds are that you´re a foreigner? But so what - I fail to see the problem. Is looking foreign a bad thing?

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