Black BAME and POC supporters of Trump

568 posts in this topic

16 hours ago, BradinBayern said:

No, it will not.  From what I have seen the situation with George floyd was a trigger but the protestors own experiences with police violence and racism is what is driving the anger. 

 

The 1992 L.A. riots started when the officers who beat Rodney King walked.  

 

16 hours ago, BradinBayern said:

You can try the victim blaming tactic as much as you want, it is almost expected in situations like these.  It doesn't justify anything. 

 

The killing of George Floyd was not justified.   It does not mean that the police won't walk.   

 

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2 hours ago, balticus said:

 

The 1992 L.A. riots started when the officers who beat Rodney King walked.  

 

 

The killing of George Floyd was not justified.   It does not mean that the police won't walk.   

 

Yes, but it had nothing to do with whether Rodney King was a saint or not.  The LA riots were a similar situation.  We have learned nothing.

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Why shouldn't they support Trump? he´s the best president you've had since Ronald Regan.

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16 hours ago, BradinBayern said:

I meant why is rushrush and his sock puppets suddenly slamming this topic that seems to have little interest with anyone else.  Trump support was in the 8% range among African Americans for his election.  It is not likely to be higher now, especially since Joe Biden is popular among African Americans and Obama will probably be campaigning for him.  So I am just wondering what the point of this thread is.  Sure there are a very few African Americans who support Trump.  He was happy to point out "my African American" during his last campaign.  I am aso sure there were rural white Texans who supported Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders, but not in any statistically relevant way.  

 
This is what I put on my FB  newsfeed

 

To paraphrase Benedict Evans ( a newsletter I follow) “My FB newsfeed is a summary of what I’ve read and thought it was interesting”

 

I following this subject for several reasons but the main one is I found it interesting, secondly we all need to decolonise our news and newsfeeds so I'm looking for Conservative Black authors. As you pointed out there aren¡t that many, partially because the numbers are small but mostly because White Educated Liberals have sucked all the oxygen out of the room. 

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Am I the only one who's sick to death of identity politics, discussions of (alleged/fake) racism and so on? The current hysteria over George Floyd's death is odd. By all accounts, his death seems to be murder and may the man rest in peace. But why have the protests spread to Europe, including Germany, which has a pretty small black population. I found it a little disturbing to be on the streets last Saturday and see so many young self-confident looking black Germans taking part in the protests. Seems like they'll always see themselves as black first and German after. It also looks like they're adopting the victim narrative of some of their black counterparts across the Atlantic, despite the fact that they (or their parents) came here voluntarily and, in the case of refugees / asylum seekers, got tonnes of help both from the German state and from civil society. Is this the Utopian multicultural dream the left has been pushing down our throats for years now? Divided societies everywhere you look and accusations of racism if you look crooked at someone? Even the corporate world has jumped on the bandwagon. The CEO of my company felt the need to issue a statement on Mr Floyd's death and he continued to virtue signal at an online meeting yesterday. But why? Why should any company feel the need to issue a statement in relation to this tragic incident? If the victim were an employee, I'd understand. And of course, everyone is assuming the killing was racially motivated - just because the perpetrator was white and the victim was black. If the roles were reversed, no doubt a double standard would be applied. And don't get me started on the double standard applied to Black Lives Matter protesters and those who protested against the coronavirus restrictions. The latter were peaceful yet were still demonised by the media and politicians as being extreme in some way. A large segment of the Black Lives Matter movement is violent and yet they're getting away with it.

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54 minutes ago, GerardB said:

... But why have the protests spread to Europe, including Germany, which has a pretty small black population. I found it a little disturbing to be on the streets last Saturday and see so many young self-confident looking black Germans taking part in the protests. Seems like they'll always see themselves as black first and German after*. It also looks like they're adopting the victim narrative of some of their black counterparts across the Atlantic, despite the fact that they (or their parents) came here voluntarily and, in the case of refugees / asylum seekers, got tonnes of help both from the German state and from civil society. Is this the Utopian multicultural dream the left has been pushing down our throats for years now?** ...

 

* If that's indeed how they see themselves (could you be assuming this because that's how you see them?) it wouldn't be surprising if that's how they're seen by others.


A Deutsche Welle article from 2017:

 

Ein Leben als Schwarzer in Deutschland - noch immer ein Kampf

[Life as a black person in Germany - still a struggle]

 

Zitate Social Cards #afrodeutschland

 

[My family has been German for over 100 years but we're still seen as foreigners.
Theodor Wonja Michael

Born in Berlin (1925)]

 

Quote

Michael ist heute stolz auf die großen Errungenschaften der Schwarzen Community in Deutschland. Er beklagt aber, noch immer werde sein Deutschsein hinterfragt von Menschen, die Deutschland als eine Nation blonder und blauäugiger weißer Menschen begreifen. Der 92-Jährige ist dieser Sichtweise überdrüssig und hofft auf weitere positive Veränderungen in Deutschland.

[Michael is now proud of the major achievements of Germany's black community. But he complains that his German-ness is still questioned by people who understand Germany to be a nation of blond and blue-eyed white people. The 92-year-old is tired of this way of looking at things and hopes that things will continue to change for the better in Germany.]


** His obituary from 2019: A life against racism: Theodor Wonja Michael

 

Quote

He was reluctant to use the word "multicultural": "Black Germans' culture is no different than the other Germans' culture," he said. Up until the end, he participated in panel discussions, gave lectures and did public readings from his autobiography published in 2013. "I want people to address racism," he said. "And that's what they're doing."

 

Afro.Deutschland (with link to documentary)

 

Quote

"Woher kommst Du?" Diese Frage hört die afro-deutsche Moderatorin Jana Pareigis seit frühster Kindheit. Dabei leben seit 400 Jahren schwarze Menschen in Deutschland. Auf ihrer Deutschlandreise begegnet Pareigis dem Rapper Samy Deluxe, dem Fußballer Gerald Asamoah und anderen. Sie schildern, wie es ist, als schwarzer Mensch in Deutschland zu leben - und was sich ändern müsste.

 

["Where are you from?" This is a question that the Afro-German TV presenter Jana Pareigis has been hearing since early childhood. Yet black people have been living in Germany for 400 years. On her journey around Germany Pareigis meets the rapper Samy Delux, the footballer Gerald Asamoah and others. They describe what it's like to live as a black person in Germany - and what needs to change.]

 

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36 minutes ago, Lorelei said:

* If that's indeed how they see themselves (could you be assuming this because that's how you see them?) it wouldn't be surprising if that's how they're seen by others.

GerardB sees them as black first then human second.

He`s nothing but a bigoted racist don`t fuel his fire.

 

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3 minutes ago, Keleth said:

GerardB sees them as black first then human second.

He`s nothing but a bigoted racist don`t fuel his fire.

 

How do you know this?

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11 minutes ago, jeba said:

How do you know this?

Becaue 9 times out of 10 when someone is always talking about "foreigners,immigrants,black before German/English or whatever" then that`s what they are.

Sorry it`s not the talking about immigration it`s how you talk about it,mentioning shouldn`t come here etc etc.

 

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1 hour ago, Lorelei said:

 

* If that's indeed how they see themselves (could you be assuming this because that's how you see them?) it wouldn't be surprising if that's how they're seen by others.


A Deutsche Welle article from 2017:

 

Ein Leben als Schwarzer in Deutschland - noch immer ein Kampf

[Life as a black person in Germany - still a struggle]

 

Zitate Social Cards #afrodeutschland

 

[My family has been German for over 100 years but we're still seen as foreigners.
Theodor Wonja Michael

Born in Berlin (1925)]

 


** His obituary from 2019: A life against racism: Theodor Wonja Michael

 

 

Afro.Deutschland (with link to documentary)

 

 

„ Where are you from?“ is itself not a racist question. It depends on WHY and HOW it is asked. Is it genuine curiosity or a „fuck off back home?“ attitude?

I have been in Greece for six years and I guarantee you the second question you are asked by any Greek ( the first one being „ how are you?“ is „ where are you from?“

 

Sometimes it is genuine curiosity, sometimes it is just a „ Floskel „... a question you are expected to ask a stranger. Greek small talk.

 

Edit- when we came here and rented a place, the Greek landlady invited us in for a coffee. Her son ( about 45 years old ) came along and - BEFORE shaking our hands and welcome etc - asked his mother in Greek if Nicole and I were married. We were both around 60!😂


I also lived in Indonesia and the second question I was asked  many times a day by total strangers as I walked past them was „ dari mana?“ ( where are you from?).

Third question, by the way, „ where‘s your wife?“

😎

 

 

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By the way, this thing about how ethnic minorities should be expected to vote Left or Right because of their ethnicity is really condescending.

Why shouldn‘t eg British Asians vote Tory ( I wouldn‘t ever but, anyway..) if they relate to their values?

An Irish friend of mine hated the expectation in London that he should vote Labour because he was Irish. He found that racist. „ A useful idiot.“

 

Many years ago at the time of Thatcher, I ended up in hospital in London  in the „ Waterworks Department „ and we ( all men in a ward ) were at a table having lunch - about 10 of us. It seems we ( white guys ) were all having a moan.

“ Fucking Thatcher, fucking Tories „... I was a proud ranty left winger and , yeah , „ fucking Thatcher, fucking Tories.“

 

One man at the table was a Guyanese and black. I remember his comment.  „ Gentlemen, please reconsider your language. You are swearing about the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.“

Was he a Tory or was he just a man with good manners? A bit old- fashioned? 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Keleth said:

Becaue 9 times out of 10 when someone is always talking about "foreigners,immigrants,black before German/English or whatever" then that`s what they are.

Doesn´t look like a substantiated argument to me.

 

1 hour ago, Keleth said:

Sorry it`s not the talking about immigration it`s how you talk about it,mentioning shouldn`t come here etc etc.

Where did he even talk about that?

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1 hour ago, john g. said:

„ Where are you from?“ is itself not a racist question.

 

I would respectfully disagree.  It is a very racist question when the implied OR PERCEIVED statement is, „You can’t be from here.“

 

I never ask this question of people whose background is not easily discernible.  If I want to know, I ask, „Are you originally from Germany, or did you move here from somewhere else?“

 

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5 minutes ago, Space Cowboy said:

 

I would respectfully disagree.  It is a very racist question when the implied OR PERCEIVED statement is, „You can’t be from here.“

 

I never ask this question of people whose background is not easily discernible.  If I want to know, I ask, „Are you originally from Germany, or did you move here from somewhere else?“

 

 

I carry it one step further. If the other person's German is better than mine, I just assume they're German. 

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It is not so easy, Space. Again, IF the attitude is „ fuck you „, then I agree with you.

If the attitude is  eg „ nice to meet you. I like your accent- where are you from?“ or just „ haven‘t seen you around here before. „.. then just curiosity. 
 

Not being from a local area is NOT racist!🙏🏻

Or enquiring about it. 
 

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Just now, AlexTr said:

 

I carry it one step further. If the other person's German is better than mine, I just assume they're German. 

 

Yeah.  As a foreigner, I like to connect with other foreigners :)  That’s why I have occasion to ask the way I do.

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3 minutes ago, Space Cowboy said:

 

I would respectfully disagree.  It is a very racist question when the implied OR PERCEIVED statement is, „You can’t be from here.“

 

I never ask this question of people whose background is not easily discernible.  If I want to know, I ask, „Are you originally from Germany, or did you move here from somewhere else?“

 

I agree with you Space Cowboy. My daughter has a friend who is black, she was born here, as were her parents, she is German.  She is often asked where she's from and when she answers Germany, they follow with "but where are you originally from?".  My daughter, who is very white, has never been asked this.

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11 minutes ago, Space Cowboy said:

I would respectfully disagree.  It is a very racist question when the implied OR PERCEIVED statement is, „You can’t be from here.“

I also disagree - but with you. I´m asked that often, e. g. at the gym and it wouldn´t occur to me that it could be unpolite.

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6 minutes ago, john g. said:

It is not so easy, Space. Again, IF the attitude is „ fuck you „, then I agree with you.

If the attitude is  eg „ nice to meet you. I like your accent- where are you from?“ or just „ haven‘t seen you around here before. „.. then just curiosity. 
 

Not being from a local area is NOT racist!🙏🏻

Or enquiring about it. 
 

 

I get it, and don’t disagree.  In a perfect world, it would be an innocuous question.  I recognize, however, that I look like a „typical“ German, and no one knows otherwise until they hear my atrocious Americsn accent.  So, I try to ensure that my questioning is not taken the wrong way.

 

I learned this the hard way, after encountering a man in a bar in Swabia who was not at all happy that someone like me is living in „his“ country,taking his job, and stealing his women. :)

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12 minutes ago, jeba said:

I also disagree - but with you. I´m asked that often, e. g. at the gym and it wouldn´t occur to me that it could be unpolite.

 

Yeah, but Germans are unconciously racist.  I csn give examples - „Indianer,“. „Squaw.“. „Nafri.“

 

I was in a bar in Bingen one night where a bunch of Germans were playing a video in which a black guy was asked where he was from.  His answer, „Schwarzwald!“  They thought it was hilarious.

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