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Australians wanting to move, travel and work in Europe.

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Me and my husband are looking at moving to Europe to fulfil a life long dream of working abroad and travelling through Europe. We are hoping to at least live abroad for 12 months, moving from country to country. My husband is 29 and I am 27, both native Australians (English speaking). I’ve heard that Amsterdam and Germany Are a good base and make the transition of moving overseas less stressful as they speak English country wide but not sure what regions would be best or how accepting locals are of foreigners. I’m not sure how strict they are on visas,etc. My husband is a qualified auto body repair tradesman and would be securing a job with the hail sheds, doing dent removal. For me, I’ve found it difficult to see what job opportunities there are besides hospitality, although this may be my best option since we plan to move around a lot. I have an admin background, currently a Human Resources coordinator. Looking for some advice. It is information overload on the internet!

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6 minutes ago, That Outdoor Chick said:

Me and my husband are looking at moving to Europe to fulfil a life long dream of working abroad and travelling through Europe. We are hoping to at least live abroad for 12 months, moving from country to country.

 

In case you haven't noticed, we are currently in the middle of a global pandemic. Furthermore, unless one of you have an EU citizenship, you'll need a work visa for each country in which you want to work.

 

6 minutes ago, That Outdoor Chick said:

I’ve heard that Amsterdam and Germany Are a good base and make the transition of moving overseas less stressful as they speak English country wide

 

Although the German government likes to claim that Germans all speak excellent English, I know many Germans who can't.

 

6 minutes ago, That Outdoor Chick said:

I’m not sure how strict they are on visas,etc.

 

All third country nationals (i.e. non-EU citizens) need work permits.

 

6 minutes ago, That Outdoor Chick said:

My husband is a qualified auto body repair tradesman and would be securing a job with the hail sheds, doing dent removal.

 

He should check out the IHK Fosa website. 

 

6 minutes ago, That Outdoor Chick said:

For me, I’ve found it difficult to see what job opportunities there are besides hospitality, although this may be my best option since we plan to move around a lot. I have an admin background, currently a Human Resources coordinator.

 

There are very very few admin positions in Germany that don't require business fluent German; even in global companies with expat technical staff the admin staff need to speak German to deal with official admin work.

 

6 minutes ago, That Outdoor Chick said:

Looking for some advice. 

 

Research the working holiday programmes and post back in a few months.

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Yes, the working holiday visa is the most viable option, but in Germany and the Netherlands the age limit is 30 for Australian citizens. In France, however, it's 35. In Munich some Irish/Australian pubs employ those people. Gaining meaningful employment is not the main goal since you just want to travel and experience Europe. In France you could pick grapes at a vineyard. This is similar what young Europeans do in Australia.

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engelchen is absolutely right.  What you describe, living abroad for 12 months, travelling from country to country sounds more like an extended holiday to me than an actual move.  Each country has their own rules.  Some European countries have working holiday agreements with Australia.  This is the website for people wanting to come to Australia:  https://www.australia.com/en/youth-travel/working-holiday-visa/faq.html  It lists who can apply and these programs are normally 2 way so that gives you an idea which European countries have one.  Say you want to work in Germany, google working holiday in Germany.  There is nothing stopping you from applying for working holidays in more than one country if you qualify so that way, you can work in a couple of different countries and visit others for short trips.  Apply soon because many of them close when you turn 30.

 

I don't know where you've heard that English knowledge is common in Germany.  They have it in school but once they are out of school, they mostly forget.  My experience is that if you are working in an office where most people are educated a bit more, then some people will speak English.  If you are working blue collar, then no.  In the Netherlands it is probably better.  I've heard they don't dub movies.  In Germany you rarely hear English on TV.

 

Aside from working holiday, I don't think you'll have much luck.  Most EU countries don't make it easy for someone to get a work permit.  Your employer would have to show that they could not find an EU citizen to do the job as EU citizens don't need permits.  If you want to come here and try to work under the table, you have a lot of competition both from asylum seekers and Germans on welfare.  Both are willing to work for less than you are.

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5 hours ago, That Outdoor Chick said:

 I’ve heard that Amsterdam and Germany Are a good base and make the transition of moving overseas less stressful as they speak English country wide

 

I don’t know where you heard that about Germany, but it simply isn’t true.  Many Germans learned English in school, but in the east of the country most people never learned any English until after the Reunification.

 

There are corporations in Germany where English is the working language, but they are the exception rather than the rule.  I work for a large multi-national firm headquartered in the US, but most of my daily conversations with colleagues and customers are in German.

 

Any kind of skilled work is going to require a minimum of B1 competency.  Administrative/technical will require a minimum of B2 language competency.  I spent over a year in daily classes to learn enough German to become employable.

 

And - all contracts and government rules you will deal with - lodging, utilities, phone, work, permits, etc. will be in German.

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5 hours ago, That Outdoor Chick said:

Me and my husband are looking at moving to Europe to fulfil a life long dream of working abroad and travelling through Europe. We are hoping to at least live abroad for 12 months, moving from country to country. My husband is 29 and I am 27, both native Australians (English speaking). I’ve heard that Amsterdam and Germany Are a good base and make the transition of moving overseas less stressful as they speak English country wide but not sure what regions would be best or how accepting locals are of foreigners. I’m not sure how strict they are on visas,etc. My husband is a qualified auto body repair tradesman and would be securing a job with the hail sheds, doing dent removal. For me, I’ve found it difficult to see what job opportunities there are besides hospitality, although this may be my best option since we plan to move around a lot. I have an admin background, currently a Human Resources coordinator. Looking for some advice. It is information overload on the internet!

Australians and New Zealanders used to do a 4 year stint, starting in the UK ( usually ) and then moving on elsewhere in Europe, USA, Latin America. 12 months!🙏🏻 Whatever happened?😟

The most viable way now in Germany - but POST- Corona - MIGHT be to apply to language schools ( from Australia ) as English teachers. Some crappy language schools, poor pay etc ( often short in- house training and then get-on-with-it ) but a way around the EU-citizens-first-rule). But a way to get a work permit. 
 

However, corona...😠😟 An Australian couple I know from my business life were happily living in Germany, went back to Australia on holiday in March and cannot come back. They have deregistered from Germany online.

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5 hours ago, That Outdoor Chick said:

Me and my husband are looking at

 

You should use "I", as in  "my husband and I..."

 

You don't say "me am looking at moving to Europe"

 

Sheesh, kids these days ;) 

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5 minutes ago, john g. said:

The most viable way now in Germany - but POST- Corona - MIGHT be to apply to language schools ( from Australia ) as English teachers.

 

Considering how many English teachers seem to have lost clients/lost hours due to the pandemic, the last thing Germany needs is more English teachers (or artists).

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I know, engelchen.. I know..😟 It was just an old-fashioned hint! “ Old-fashioned “ used to mean years, decades.. rather than a few months..😠

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There's another thing that some people look into and that is whether one of you qualifies for EU citizenship.  Any long lost grandma or grandpa that came from an EU country that you might have a claim for dual citizenship through?  If you do, applying for it might take a few months but once you have it, you can move to and work in any EU country.

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@LeonG: many countries already closed that backdoor, known exceptions are Portugal, Spain and Greece. I know there is a fairly large Greek community in Australia, but the Spanish mainly went to Latin America and the Portuguese to former African colonies. Lots of Dutchies in Australia, but we closed this backdoor. Also, mostly you need to claim this citizenship 6 months before you turn 18. Well, they can certainly look into it.

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3 minutes ago, LukeSkywalker said:

@LeonG: many countries already closed that backdoor,

 

What about the UK and Ireland?

 

 

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For the UK and Ireland there are still some options. In the UK it's called double descent, but is not an easy route. Here, they also mention the age threshold of 18 for children: https://us.iasservices.org.uk/visas/settle-uk/british-citizenship/british-citizenship-by-descent-grandparent/

 

Basically, you have to contact the local embassy for further info and criteria. Also, who has birth certificates of their grandparents?

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6 hours ago, LukeSkywalker said:

@LeonG: many countries already closed that backdoor, known exceptions are Portugal, Spain and Greece. I know there is a fairly large Greek community in Australia, but the Spanish mainly went to Latin America and the Portuguese to former African colonies. Lots of Dutchies in Australia, but we closed this backdoor. Also, mostly you need to claim this citizenship 6 months before you turn 18. Well, they can certainly look into it.

 

I know a US guy who got Italian citizenship based on his grandmother a few years ago and he's pretty far past his 18th birthday.  He used it to move to the UK.  He knew another American who gained Irish citizenship through a grandparent so I think it's worth looking into.  Sure, many countries limit it to an age or to the first generation but they could get lucky.

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On 29/05/2020, 4:39:14, john g. said:

I know, engelchen.. I know..😟 It was just an old-fashioned hint! “ Old-fashioned “ used to mean years, decades.. rather than a few months..😠

Thank you John for your advice. I thought it may be obvious that I wasn’t going to go anywhere during the current pandemic. I probably should have made it more clear that this would be happening in a few years as it takes time to sort out visas, accommodation, jobs and so on. You seem to get that. 

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On 29/05/2020, 4:31:45, Janx Spirit said:

 

You should use "I", as in  "my husband and I..."

 

You don't say "me am looking at moving to Europe"

 

Sheesh, kids these days ;) 

Thanks for the lesson. It’s hard to keep track of what the phone corrects words to and my grammar when writing a long message like this. But thanks for adding no value to this post

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On 29/05/2020, 4:24:18, john g. said:

Australians and New Zealanders used to do a 4 year stint, starting in the UK ( usually ) and then moving on elsewhere in Europe, USA, Latin America. 12 months!🙏🏻 Whatever happened?😟

The most viable way now in Germany - but POST- Corona - MIGHT be to apply to language schools ( from Australia ) as English teachers. Some crappy language schools, poor pay etc ( often short in- house training and then get-on-with-it ) but a way around the EU-citizens-first-rule). But a way to get a work permit. 
 

However, corona...😠😟 An Australian couple I know from my business life were happily living in Germany, went back to Australia on holiday in March and cannot come back. They have deregistered from Germany online.

12 months is the starting point for us. We would probably end up staying longer, just that we have to sort out a long term rental for our house in order to pay the mortgage. My husband would find it easy to get the work so he would probably apply for a skilled visa and I would be the spouse on that visa. This would all be well and truly post corona 

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On 29/05/2020, 5:34:08, LeonG said:

There's another thing that some people look into and that is whether one of you qualifies for EU citizenship.  Any long lost grandma or grandpa that came from an EU country that you might have a claim for dual citizenship through?  If you do, applying for it might take a few months but once you have it, you can move to and work in any EU country.

Thanks Leon, we do but I think it goes further back than our grandparents, I think great grandparents. I will have to do some digging into our ancestry 😂

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47 minutes ago, That Outdoor Chick said:

12 months is the starting point for us. We would probably end up staying longer, just that we have to sort out a long term rental for our house in order to pay the mortgage. My husband would find it easy to get the work so he would probably apply for a skilled visa and I would be the spouse on that visa. This would all be well and truly post corona 

 

Look into working holiday first.  It's really the easy way for you both to get an open work permit fast.  If your husband wants to try for a skilled work permit, sure you can reach out to employers and see if you get any offers.  I don't think it's easy though.  At least not in Germany. Another thing is he would be stuck in that job because he needs a new permit if he wants to change employers.

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On 28/05/2020, 11:27:22, LeonG said:

engelchen is absolutely right.  What you describe, living abroad for 12 months, travelling from country to country sounds more like an extended holiday to me than an actual move.  Each country has their own rules.  Some European countries have working holiday agreements with Australia.  This is the website for people wanting to come to Australia:  https://www.australia.com/en/youth-travel/working-holiday-visa/faq.html  It lists who can apply and these programs are normally 2 way so that gives you an idea which European countries have one.  Say you want to work in Germany, google working holiday in Germany.  There is nothing stopping you from applying for working holidays in more than one country if you qualify so that way, you can work in a couple of different countries and visit others for short trips.  Apply soon because many of them close when you turn 30.

 

I don't know where you've heard that English knowledge is common in Germany.  They have it in school but once they are out of school, they mostly forget.  My experience is that if you are working in an office where most people are educated a bit more, then some people will speak English.  If you are working blue collar, then no.  In the Netherlands it is probably better.  I've heard they don't dub movies.  In Germany you rarely hear English on TV.

 

Aside from working holiday, I don't think you'll have much luck.  Most EU countries don't make it easy for someone to get a work permit.  Your employer would have to show that they could not find an EU citizen to do the job as EU citizens don't need permits.  If you want to come here and try to work under the table, you have a lot of competition both from asylum seekers and Germans on welfare.  Both are willing to work for less than you are.

Thanks Leon. By the time we are looking at actually making the move, my husband will be over 30 and will probably apply/ be eligible for the skilled visa (I would just be the secondary applicant). The nature of his work requires us to move around and chase the hail, it’s just an added benefit that we can sight see as we do it. I suppose it is going to be me that has the issue finding work, I think hospitality may be my only option.  We would just like to base ourselves primarily in one place that would be easy to get around and fit in stress free at the start. 

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