Translation of abbreviation in geneology document

13 posts in this topic

I have a genealogy document from the place my great-grandfather came from. The information is from a Kirchenregister. I have one question.

Under "Eltern der Hausmutter" for the mother it says: Sibylle Doroth. Kathar. n.Luithlen.

 

I am trying to figure out if the "n." before the name Luithlen means anything. I had asked one of my German friends, but she didn't know. Would any of you Toytowners know? 

 

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13 minutes ago, JN53 said:

I have a genealogy document from the place my great-grandfather came from. The information is from a Kirchenregister. I have one question.

Under "Eltern der Hausmutter" for the mother it says: Sibylle Doroth. Kathar. n.Luithlen.

 

I am trying to figure out if the "n." before the name Luithlen means anything. I had asked one of my German friends, but she didn't know. Would any of you Toytowners know? 

 

née

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To me it looks like Katharina

 

Could the dots be where the text recognition failed?

 

PS „Dorothea“ is also missing some letters :)

 

 

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1 hour ago, martinamr said:

To me it looks like Katharina

 

Could the dots be where the text recognition failed?

 

PS „Dorothea“ is also missing some letters :)

 

 

Some decades ago, the middle names would not be written in full. So  Doroth. was  an accepted recognizable  form . 

Same in the UK- I have documents from Grandparents- Wm. For William.

And n- nee as in "born".

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2 hours ago, BradinBayern said:

née

Did Germans use that term way back then? I am familiar with it in Britain but no idea if Germany used it rather than „ geb.“

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8 minutes ago, john g. said:

Did Germans use that term way back then? I am familiar with it in Britain but no idea if Germany used it rather than „ geb.“

 

I am assuming that this was copied/typed up in the 1970's, as the date of the typed document is 1978, but the info is probably from the late 1800's, as there isn't info on where my great-grandfather went to in the U.S. So I will go with née. It just seemed strange to be, since on the other areas in the documents geb. is used. 

Thanks for the info. on this.

Now if I could just go back in time briefly. I'd love to hear their Swabian accents and compare them to today!

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42 minutes ago, JN53 said:

 

I am assuming that this was copied/typed up in the 1970's, as the date of the typed document is 1978, but the info is probably from the late 1800's, as there isn't info on where my great-grandfather went to in the U.S. So I will go with née. It just seemed strange to be, since on the other areas in the documents geb. is used. 

Thanks for the info. on this.

Now if I could just go back in time briefly. I'd love to hear their Swabian accents and compare them to today!

Go visit the Amish if you want to hear ancient Swabian.  However there will be a lot of Americanisms mixed in. 

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58 minutes ago, john g. said:

Did Germans use that term way back then? I am familiar with it in Britain but no idea if Germany used it rather than „ geb.“

I have seen it used in German. 

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I understand Stuttgarter Schwäbisch fairly well, as I lived there a few years and had relatives that couldn't speak standard German. I love listening to the different German dialects, but I doubt I'd understand Platt (I assume that is Low German) much.

I lived near the Amish in Pennsylvania (PA) and had one opportunity to listen to them talk, but understood nothing, although it sounded like German. It didn't sound like Swabian to me, but maybe there are different PA Dutch accents.

Anyway, I'd better not get started on languages or I'll completely derail this translation thread. 

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1 hour ago, LukeSkywalker said:

Just for the record: there are no Dutch people living in PA 🤓.

 

That's true. They are just traditionally called that, at least from what I know. It is most likely misinterpretation of Deutsch. That's why they are sometimes referred to as the Pennsylvania Dutch-so not Dutch at all. 

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23 hours ago, LukeSkywalker said:

Just for the record: there are no Dutch people living in PA 🤓.

The Eastern part of PA was settled by the Dutch in the 1600s and was part of "New Netherland".  I think it is fair to say that there are a few Dutch people living there.

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