Working in Switzerland living in Germany

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Hi, I am creating this post because I have been trying to find information on an official Swiss website and couldn't find it.
I am contacting the authorities but meanwhile, I would like to know if anybody here had a similar experience.

 

Let's suppose that a person has a Swiss residence permit B, she is from England, and has a job contract in Switzerland. She wants to rent and live in Germany and commute to her work in Switzerland daily.

Some people told me: because of your residence permit, you HAVE to live in Switzerland. Some other people told me that this is irrelevant, you may want to travel from Japan every morning if you want.

So I am trying to get an official answer to this. Do you have any experience on this? any link to share?
Thanks!
 

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Whether you can or not I don't know for sure. I do know of people who do it, but are they British? I don't think so.

 

I guess some considerations will be:

Brexit?

Health Insurance - living in DE you would need DE-authorised HI.

Tax - you pay tax where you live, not necessarily where you work.

Car registration, insurance etc .. must be in DE (where you live).

 

Probably a few more things to consider which I can't immediately think of.

 

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2 minutes ago, Malt-Teaser said:

Whether you can or not I don't know for sure. I do know of people who do it, but are they British? I don't think so.

 

I guess some considerations will be:

Brexit?

Health Insurance - living in DE you would need DE-authorised HI.

Tax - you pay tax where you live, not necessarily where you work.

Car registration, insurance etc .. must be in DE (where you live).

 

Probably a few more things to consider which I can't immediately think of.

 

 

Hi, thanks for your answer. At this point, I am focusing on if the residence permit B requires you are registered and living in Switzerland or not. 

Taxation, insurance, cars, etc are to analyse later. No point to think of those if you are not allowed to live somewhere else while holding a B residence permit.

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19 hours ago, Malt-Teaser said:

Probably a few more things to consider which I can't immediately think of.

I could think of one: The risk that the border will be closed so you can´t get to work or back home. Think corona or some animosity between Germany and Switzerland. E. g. some years ago Germany closed the border (or at least made crossing very difficult and time consuming by thoroughly checking each and every car - I don´t remember) to put pressure on Switzerland to cooperate in some tax issue.

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If you have a Swiss residence permit B, you are legally required to reside in Switzerland. However in practice this is not checked and you merely need an address to receive mail at. On a Swiss residence permit B, you need to pay income tax and health insurance based on that address in Switzerland. Health insurance is compulsory in Switzerland as it technically is in Germany, the difference being in Switzerland if you don't sign up for a policy within 3 months of your B permit being granted and provide evidence of this to your town hall, you will be assigned a health insurance by the authorities and be billed for this monthly whether you want it or not. 

 

There is nothing stopping a person who legally resides in Switzerland from renting and effectively living their life in Germany, except it could get complicated. especially if you have to cross the border each day and there are checks. In ordinary times of course this border check issue wouldn't be a problem. 

 

The correct route would be to legally reside in Germany and apply for a cross border worker permit G. 

On this permit you will have no problem crossing the border, you will pay income tax in Germany and you don't need to maintain an address in Switzerland. You can choose to take out health insurance in either Switzerland or Germany. If you live very close to the border and are in Switzerland almost every day, it may make sense to take out the insurance in Switzerland as it gives you access to healthcare in Switzerland and Germany. 

 

British citizens remain unaffected by Brexit for applying for jobs in Switzerland (whether via Switzerland on a B permit or Germany on a G permit) until the end of the transition period (currently until the end of 2020). After that I am not sure what happens. 

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A further note on this. 

If you opt for a Swiss residence permit, you will need to convert your British driver's licence to a Swiss one at some point, your motor car will need Swiss registration plates and you need Swiss motor insurance - these things may be more expensive in Switzerland than the German equivalents. 

If you opt for a Swiss G (cross border worker) permit, you will be legally resident in Germany and need to do all of this stuff in Germany. 

You can drive the car on both sides of the border, but it has to have number plates from the country in which you are legally registered as being resident. One of the reasons being every time you cross the D/CH border by car you are passing from one customs area to another, with the vehicle. 

 

Home contents insurance is quite a bit more expensive in Switzerland. 

 

TV licencing is also compulsory as well as more expensive in Switzerland (say at least €30 per month) and you now generally need it (one per household), whether you are have a TV/radio or not. Like in Germany, dwellings with no registered resident (but someone may be living inside (and resident elsewhere)) do not need a licence. 

 

I hope this helps.

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6 hours ago, lunaCH said:

A further note on this. 

If you opt for a Swiss residence permit, you will need to convert your British driver's licence to a Swiss one at some point, your motor car will need Swiss registration plates and you need Swiss motor insurance - these things may be more expensive in Switzerland than the German equivalents. 

If you opt for a Swiss G (cross border worker) permit, you will be legally resident in Germany and need to do all of this stuff in Germany. 

You can drive the car on both sides of the border, but it has to have number plates from the country in which you are legally registered as being resident. One of the reasons being every time you cross the D/CH border by car you are passing from one customs area to another, with the vehicle. 

 

Home contents insurance is quite a bit more expensive in Switzerland. 

 

TV licencing is also compulsory as well as more expensive in Switzerland (say at least €30 per month) and you now generally need it (one per household), whether you are have a TV/radio or not. Like in Germany, dwellings with no registered resident (but someone may be living inside (and resident elsewhere)) do not need a licence. 

 

I hope this helps.

 

Hi, thank you for your comments. It makes complete sense.

The situation arises because she doesn't need to go to the office every day, only maybe 2 or 3 days per week. So she was exploring the chance to buy a house in 
Germany and maybe live there. Just random ideas.

Thanks

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7 hours ago, travelerworker said:

 

Hi, thank you for your comments. It makes complete sense.

The situation arises because she doesn't need to go to the office every day, only maybe 2 or 3 days per week. So she was exploring the chance to buy a house in 
Germany
and maybe live there. Just random ideas.

Thanks

If her main or sole income is in Swiss francs, then it would be a thought to do what we did and have her mortgage on the German property in Swiss francs also. This would safeguard against any future exchange rate fluctuations. There are German banks which offer mortgages in Swiss francs for properties in Germany. Some Swiss banks offer mortgages in Swiss francs on properties in Germany also. 

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9 hours ago, travelerworker said:

 

Hi, thank you for your comments. It makes complete sense.

The situation arises because she doesn't need to go to the office every day, only maybe 2 or 3 days per week. So she was exploring the chance to buy a house in 
Germany and maybe live there. Just random ideas.

Thanks

 

This adds complications. An employee on a G-permit that does home office >25%, will have to pay social securities in the home country, and  has potential insurance liabilities. Additionally she would have to pay some double tax for the days worked from home. 

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1 hour ago, Dubya said:

 

This adds complications. An employee on a G-permit that does home office >25%, will have to pay social securities in the home country, and  has potential insurance liabilities. Additionally she would have to pay some double tax for the days worked from home. 

But, if this is true, it may be beneficial as social security deductions would also be made by the Swiss and if you have to pay them in Germany also, you'll be saving towards pensions in two countries simultaneously. 

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1 hour ago, lunaCH said:

But, if this is true, it may be beneficial as social security deductions would also be made by the Swiss and if you have to pay them in Germany also, you'll be saving towards pensions in two countries simultaneously. 

I shall clarify this: the employer is responsible to make the correct social security contribution. In the case of >25% home office in Germany, they’d have to pay German social security (but not Swiss). So the employer won’t allow it. 

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19 hours ago, Dubya said:

I shall clarify this: the employer is responsible to make the correct social security contribution. In the case of >25% home office in Germany, they’d have to pay German social security (but not Swiss). So the employer won’t allow it. 

Understood. But for that to actually occur though the Swiss employer would need to be aware that that is what they have to do and the German authorities would need to be informed of the situation to be able to invoice the contributions. 

Would German contributions need to be paid even if the situation is temporary (a few months), like in the current situation (partial shutdown)?

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6 hours ago, Calculate said:

I do know of people who do it, but are they British? 

I wouldn't be surprised if you did know some. There are around 60'000 people living in Germany but working in Switzerland, so some will be British. ;) With the transition period of Brexit coming to an end, it will be the last chance for any Brits to take up residence in Germany/the EU under the old rules, whilst maintaining employment in Switzerland. From next year they could face extra complications.

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