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Germans upset about being photographed in public places

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Yeah, when I took a picture of the Brandenburger Tor, more than 500 people moved out of the way 馃.

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44 minutes ago, LukeSkywalker said:

Yeah, when I took a picture of the Brandenburger Tor, more than 500 people moved out of the way 馃.

When I took a picture of it, noone moved out the way, but it didn't bother anyone either. I guess I have also been lucky in my experiences here. I have in my 20 years here never had something like that happen.

So no, never had a German being upset about me photographing a tourist attraction in a public place. I do though try not to take photos of people, and those around saw it was obvious I was photographing something of historical interest, for example Cologne Cathedral.

In general though I myself hate being photographed, even privately, and try not to photograph other people just out of empathy of hating it myself.

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Tensions are running high here, too. I took a picture of this tree today and it told me to bugger off.

IMG_3292.jpg

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Rules

I have no trouble with rules that really impact other people's lives, such as noise ordinances.聽 I just have a problem with rules that are only there to enforce other people's preferences on others.

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When I started coming to Germany frequently I remember a German/American聽 family telling me about this, and stressing that is was the law of the land.聽 This would have been in the mid to late 80s.聽 I remember posing questions about press photographer taking action shots of football matches and captions identifying the players and officials and what happened if spectators were identifiable.聽 I never received a clear answer..

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11 hours ago, starkebogen said:

I never received a clear answer..

Germans are good at theory; not so much at practice.

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On 4/11/2020, 7:19:58, starkebogen said:

When I started coming to Germany frequently I remember a German/American聽 family telling me about this, and stressing that is was the law of the land.聽 This would have been in the mid to late 80s.聽 I remember posing questions about press photographer taking action shots of football matches and captions identifying the players and officials and what happened if spectators were identifiable.聽 I never received a clear answer..

The answer is simple as fuck: public gatherings are excluded from the law, public persons (politicians, actors etc) also can be photographed freely as freedom of press/freedom of expression takes precedence over their right not to be photographed. That doesn't mean that public persons do not have privacy: paparazzi-style photos are illegal AFAIK.

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