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Germans upset about being photographed in public places

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Hi, I have been living in Germany for around 4 years and, I am guessing if this is a coincidence or not, found so many people really concerned and even aggressive if you take a picture on a public place and they end on the picture.

3 situations I remember:

- on the Sbahn I take a pic of the driver's compartment from behind (for some reason was open). Next station the driver comes to me and in a very aggressive way demands me to delete it.

- In a park, making a video, sort of panorama to show the whole place, a guy is riding his bike towards me, so he ended in the movie. His father came to me, again in not a very nice way, to ask why I am taping his kid.

- visiting an old church I am on the street, in front of it, and takes a picture of the building. A lady is sitting outside, 20 mts from me, and came immediately to ask me to delete it.

 

So, did I had bad luck and found those 3 crazy characters or is a common thing with photos?

Any experience?

 

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I think this paranoia has set in in the last twenty years or so. It never used to be like that for most people. Maybe because of the stricter privacy and data protection laws? Internet and abuse of photos to blackmail people who, eg, should be at work and not on the beach?

Dunno.

The safest way is to ask people’s permission first, I guess.

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No, it's actually older than that. Many years ago I was on a weekend holiday with some friends, one of them German -- when she arrived in her car, I waved at her from the balcony as she approached the house and aimed my camera at her, to take a spontaneous photo. She immediately raised a hand and said no, quite crossly, mumbled something about "Recht auf das eigene Privatsphere" or something like that. I actually think she used another word than Privatsphere but I can't think of it right now -- maybe Abbildung or something.)

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Wouldn’t happen in Greece ( unless someone was clearly doing something wrong and didn’t want to get caught!).

Arunadasi, did you also have a camera of sorts before? Eg an Instamatic! Going back a while! Took pictures all over the place whilst travelling around the world. Most people were only too happy to have their picture taken and smile!

Think this should maybe be on the First World Problem thread!

🙏🏻

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I guess it is this:

Quote


 

Das Recht am eigenen Bild oder Bildnisrecht ist eine besondere Ausprägung des allgemeinen Persönlichkeitsrechts. Es besagt, dass jeder Mensch grundsätzlich selbst darüber bestimmen darf, ob und in welchem Zusammenhang Bilder von ihm veröffentlicht werden. Im anglo-amerikanischen Raum ist das Recht am eigenen Bild weitaus freier gestaltet als im deutschen Rechtsraum

 

 

Yes, the law is about publishing someone's photo, but I suppose some people take it far more personally. They want you to ask permission first.

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Actually John, it was definitely less than 20 years ago so you're right. It would have been with a camera phone.

I'm really losing track of time. It could have been about 10 years ago. It was surprising, because she is not one of those very uptight Germans, in fact she was a bubbly, happy-go-lucky type normally  -- and half Greek, possibly!

I use past tense because in the end we had to let go of her for our yearly meetings, she was far too unreliable.

 

Mostly, "third world" people are quite eager to have their photo taken, aren't they!

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And all of the Moaning Minnies complaining about having their photo taken without their permission- are on Facebook, Instagram, all being narcissist!😂

That DOES include Germans!!

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@travelerworker Lots of Germans are very uncomfortable with strangers taking photos of them.  It’s best to avoid doing so, and if you do accidentally capture someone in a photo and they ask you to delete it, just accommodate them.

 

The hassle isn’t worth it.

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7 minutes ago, Space Cowboy said:

@travelerworker Lots of Germans are very uncomfortable with strangers taking photos of them.  It’s best to avoid doing so, and if you do accidentally capture someone in a photo and they ask you to delete it, just accommodate them.

 

The hassle isn’t worth it.

I know, just curious about it, wondering what people are thinking...I am not taking photos of them, I am taking a photo of a public park or a famous church...

 

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To Americans, it seems weird - we have no expectation of privacy. There’s a Google Street View of every house I’ve ever lived in in the US.

 

Here, nothing but low-res satellite views...

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I believe it goes back to the period of National Socialism when people were 'monitored'. Personally I'm quite happy about it because we don't know where our pictures will end up and with facial recognition now there's a lot about us that is being monitored whether we like it or not.

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2 hours ago, Space Cowboy said:

 It’s best to avoid doing so, and if you do accidentally capture someone in a photo and they ask you to delete it, just accommodate them.

 

 

I'm picturing the running of the bulls  in Pamplona coming to a complete halt because some german in the crowd says, "Stop taking my pic and Delete it!".  Nutty.

Google Street Blurs = Nutty too.

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4 hours ago, travelerworker said:

on the Sbahn I take a pic of the driver's compartment from behind

 

Probably like taking a picture of a cockpit on a plane. Big security risk like you're planning some kind of terrorist attack.

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Back in the not so old days when photos had to be developed and were limited to prints on paper I don't think it was a big deal. These days though someone could take your photo electronically paste your face on a porn photo, or something else embarrassing or even criminal then put it up on the internet to be viewed by millions. A major factor of difference if you see what I mean.

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5 hours ago, fraufruit said:

 

Probably like taking a picture of a cockpit on a plane. Big security risk like you're planning some kind of terrorist attack.

 

I doubt that is the reason.  There are plenty photos / Videos from cockpits - for example the Pilots Eye series .

They go into a fair amount of technical detail (for instance on the first attempt to film with SWISS Zurich to Shanghai

they had an engine overheat whilst still climbing out & showed how they analysed the issue, shut down the engine

(one of four), dumped fuel & turned back).

 

These productions have been made with the support of Lufthansa / SWISS etc.

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12 hours ago, arunadasi said:

I guess it is this:

 

Yes, the law is about publishing someone's photo, but I suppose some people take it far more personally. They want you to ask permission first.

 

8 hours ago, catjones said:

 

I'm picturing the running of the bulls  in Pamplona coming to a complete halt because some german in the crowd says, "Stop taking my pic and Delete it!".  Nutty.

Google Street Blurs = Nutty too.

 

Here's more information:  https://www.anwalt.de/rechtstipps/bitte-laecheln-ist-das-fotografieren-fremder-personen-erlaubt_114299.html

 

Quote

 

Sind alle auf den Bildern zu sehenden Menschen mit ihrer Ablichtung einverstanden, gibt es regelmäßig keine Probleme. Das Einverständnis muss nicht schriftlich oder ausdrücklich mit einem Satz wie: „Ja, Du darfst mich fotografieren“, erklärt werden. Vielmehr genügt in der Regel bereits ein bewusstes Lächeln in die Kamera, damit ein Foto geschossen werden darf.

Werden Personen dagegen gezielt ohne Einwilligung fotografiert, kann das eine Verletzung ihrer Persönlichkeitsrechte darstellen. Betroffene haben dann unter Umständen Ansprüche auf Unterlassung und Schadenersatz.

An öffentlichen Plätzen oder Sehenswürdigkeiten ist es meist aber gar nicht möglich, ein Foto zu schießen, ohne dass die eine oder andere Person mit im Bild ist. Auch solche Aufnahmen im öffentlichen Raum, die vor allem ein Baudenkmal oder eine Landschaft zeigen – und unbeteiligte Menschen nur als Beiwerk –, sind nicht verboten.

 

 

If all the people to be seen in the pictures agree to be photographed, there are regularly no problems. The consent does not have to be given in writing or explicitly with a sentence like: "Yes, you may photograph me". Rather, a conscious smile into the camera is usually sufficient for a photo to be taken.

 

If, on the other hand, people are deliberately photographed without their consent, this can constitute an infringement of their personal rights. Those affected may then be entitled to injunctive relief and compensation.

 

In public places or places of interest, however, it is usually not possible to take a photo without one or the other person being in the picture. Also such photographs in public places, which mainly show an architectural monument or a landscape - and uninvolved people only as accessories - are not prohibited.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

 

Edit: There's more in the article concerning passing on photos being a possible criminal offence.

 

 

 

 

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11 hours ago, catjones said:

 

I'm picturing the running of the bulls  in Pamplona coming to a complete halt because some german in the crowd says, "Stop taking my pic and Delete it!".  Nutty.

Google Street Blurs = Nutty too.

As far as I know, German laws are only valid in Germany. Did you obey?

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Maybe it's just luck, but whenever we've visited Munich and I've taken photos.. lots of photos normally of the people I'm with in public places, where you're bound to get others in the picture unintentionally, we've never been approached or asked to delete.

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2 minutes ago, Missysx said:

Maybe it's just luck, but whenever we've visited Munich and I've taken photos.. lots of photos normally of the people I'm with in public places, where you're bound to get others in the picture unintentionally, we've never been approached or asked to delete.

 

Same here. Normally the people have even politely moved out of the way so I could get a nice view of whatever I was photographing at the time.

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