Any chance I could bring my mother to Germany on a Res Visa?

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Hi there, I'm a German citizen currently residing in Germany with my wife and child. My mother (US citizen) currently lives in the US and we'd like to have her move in with us as her financial situation is relatively tight and she's getting up there in years. Is it possible for me to get her a visa to live here in Germany. I've researched this quite a bit and it looks possible but there's really no specific info as far as I can tell. If it makes a difference, she was born and spent the first 3 years of her life here. Can anyone offer guidance? Thanks!! 

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Based on the information you have provided, I think it will be very difficult, bordering on impossible.

 

Non-EU parents of adult German citizens are not eligible for a residence permit based on family reunification, so that leaves humanitarian grounds.  This category is actually the most difficult to justify in this specific situation.  The US is a wealthy country with an overall high standard of living, so claiming hardship would likely fail.  There would have to be extreme circumstances, such as your mother is totally bedridden and has no one in the US who can look after her, or something along those lines.

 

Being born in Germany is of no help, unless your mother can legitimately claim to be a German citizen due to having German parent(s).

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I tried this many years ago with my mother, who then lived in Guyana.
It didn't work out; the main problem was health  insurance. It would have been unaffordable, and she had to have it.

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Thanks for the info - would it help if she was already insured in Germany? She must've been through her family as a young kid, she was also a German citizen until she naturalized in the US in the 80's...

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I have no idea! Maybe others can help. Sorry, and good luck.

 

We were trying to do so on humanitarian grounds. She lived in a poor 3rd world country all on her own. I am her only child, and she had no other relatives in the country, so that was fairly easy to justify. She was about 70 at the time.

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48 minutes ago, punkfan said:

Thanks for the info - would it help if she was already insured in Germany? She must've been through her family as a young kid, she was also a German citizen until she naturalized in the US in the 80's...

 

Could she become German again? (Open question to all TTers)

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57 minutes ago, arunadasi said:

Could she become German again? (Open question to all TTers)

 

Googling suggests only by going the naturalisation procedure.

 

https://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/en/aamt/zugastimaa/buergerservice/faq/12-wiedererwerb/606656

 

"I lost my German citizenship because I acquired a foreign nationality. Can I get my German citizenship back? 

In principle it is possible for former Germans to be renaturalized. Key conditions include the ability to support oneself, mastery of the German language and proof of ties to Germany. Generally health insurance for Germany is also required. Chances are very much increased by a readiness to relinquish all previous nationalities."

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13 hours ago, arunadasi said:

It didn't work out; the main problem was health  insurance. It would have been unaffordable, and she had to have it.

But if the OP´s mom was publicly insured during those 3 years her then insurance woud have to accept her AFAIK (not 100% sure though). But does she still know which insurance it was and can she prove it?

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3 hours ago, arunadasi said:

 

Could she become German again? (Open question to all TTers)

Was she even a German citizen? Just because you´re born in Germany doesn´t mean you become a citizen.

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2 minutes ago, jeba said:

Was she even a German citizen? Just because you´re born in Germany doesn´t mean you become a citizen.

 

See post above from OP

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1 minute ago, Space Cowboy said:

 

See post above from OP

That doesn´t say whether ot not she once was a German citizen.

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4 hours ago, punkfan said:

she was also a German citizen until she naturalized in the US in the 80's...

 

Just now, jeba said:

That doesn´t say whether ot not she once was a German citizen.

 

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Thanks everyone for the help so far - yes she was a German citizen until 1988 when she naturalized and became American. She lived in Germany from age 0-3 I believe - her mother is still alive and she went back to Germany to live on multiple occasions and still retained her German citizenship until pretty recently. I would assume that she would've stayed with the same KK over the years and my grandmother would still know which one it was. In terms of "proving it" I'm not sure anyone has any records...

 

And my mom speaks German yes.

 

I'm guessing the thing to do here is to find out which KK she belonged to and consult with them? What's the visa process, if for-the-sake-of-argument she was insurable? Also - she still works part-time in the US...if she got a job for a year or two in Germany would she qualify for health insurance that way like a younger person would?

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18 minutes ago, punkfan said:

 I would assume that she would've stayed with the same KK over the years and my grandmother would still know which one it is. In terms of "proving it" I'm not sure anyone has any records...

 

My soon-to-be-ex-wife is German.  She lived in the US for 20 years, and when we moved here as a family from the US a few years ago, we had trouble obtaining health insurance, until STBEW remembered that she was covered by Barmer while she was attending a German University, before going to the US.

 

She had absolutely no record or proof of this, but with the name of the University and her former address, Barmer was able to search their paper archives and find records of her previous coverage.  It took quite a long while, but this shows that it is doable if sufficient information to support the search is available.

 

To follow up from my original answer:  since your mother was a German citizen, she can petition to be naturalized.  The standard requirement is that she must give up her US citizenship though.

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5 minutes ago, Space Cowboy said:

 

My soon-to-be-ex-wife is German.  She lived in the US for 20 years, and when we moved here as a family from the US a few years ago, we had trouble obtaining health insurance, until STBEW remembered that she was covered by Barmer while she was attending a German University, before going to the US.

 

She had absolutely no record or proof of this, but with the name of the University and her former address, Barmer was able to search their paper archives and find records of her previous coverage.  It took quite a long while, but this shows that it is doable if sufficient information to support the search is available.

 

To follow up from my original answer:  since your mother was a German citizen, she can petition to be naturalized.  The standard requirement is that she must give up her US citizenship though.

Ok thanks for the info great to know! Luckily, this doesn't need to happen overnight - we have plenty of time to plan it. The renunciation though seems kinda scary - she should've just kept her German passport and Green Card I guess.

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3 minutes ago, punkfan said:

Ok thanks for the info great to know! Luckily, this doesn't need to happen overnight - we have plenty of time to plan it. The renunciation though seems kinda scary - she should've just kept her German passport and Green Card I guess.

 

If she were to stay permanently in Germany, the renunciation is not scary - it is a good thing.  Otherwise as a US citizen she will be subject to dual taxation and FinCEN regulations.

 

My STBEW also became a US citizen, but petitioned the German government to keep her German citizenship.  This was fine when she lived in the US, but now that she has returned to Germany, being a dual US/German citizen is causing her all sorts of problems.

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52 minutes ago, punkfan said:

Also - she still works part-time in the US...if she got a job for a year or two in Germany would she qualify for health insurance that way like a younger person would?

There is an age limit of 55 years for acceptance into public health insurance. I´m not sure though whether that would apply in this case. But @john g. will probably know.

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