Driving to my garden during quarantine

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I have a garden 7 km from my home. Can I drive there or am I breaking the quarantine rules? I live in a village close to Erlangen. Thanks.

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I was wondering about this, too - we can't see why not in our region, but no-one else is up at ours, even though there's a sign on the gate saying that club gatherings for gardening or anything else are cancelled, but at least we can go to our gardens - maybe all the others are home because they are seriously staying inside all the time. For us, we have a house with a driveway, so it is very safe to leave. It is quite nice up there because a footpath goes through the garden area, and so we can wave and shout hello to the dog walkers etc who pass from a safe distance. 

 

We finally have time to prune our massive ancient cherry tree - yesterday a witty old guy told us the cherries are not yet ready for harvest...then after we had laughed sufficiently, he actually came back up to tell us we really were doing it at the wrong time of year, which we know, but hey - now is when we have time. He was super smiley, and it was nice - so German to have to tell us what we are doing wrong, but done in a very gentle way.

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14 hours ago, SeeLandSky said:

I have a garden 7 km from my home. Can I drive there or am I breaking the quarantine rules? I live in a village close to Erlangen. Thanks.

 

Do you mean quarantine or Ausgangsbeschränkung (curfew)? It's a big difference. If you mean Ausgangsbeschränkung, it's allowed in your region according to the link @robinson100 posted. 

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16 hours ago, kiplette said:

so German to have to tell us what we are doing wrong,

Being Germany myself I can´t see what´s wrong with that. He was just trying to be helpful.

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4 hours ago, jeba said:

Being Germany myself I can´t see what´s wrong with that. He was just trying to be helpful.

Germans love to point out when others are wrong, but can hardly admit their wrong themselves, never mind an apology! 😱

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8 hours ago, jeba said:

Being Germany myself I can´t see what´s wrong with that. He was just trying to be helpful.

 

Ich bin Deutschland...

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8 hours ago, jeba said:

Being Germany myself I can´t see what´s wrong with that. He was just trying to be helpful.

 

Most times when Germans see someone doing something "wrong", they take a Besserwisser attitude and assume the other person do not know he is doing it "wrong".   Truth is the world is not black and white, it might be that the other person knows it is not the optimal thing to do but there is no alternative or does not care about it.   And sometimes the "I am right" is something totally subjective and the other person is sure as well he is right.

 

i.e.

 

Foreign Guy is putting his winter tyres in early September.   Good German Neighbor approaches him and tells him it is not yet the time to do it.   Foreign Guy smiles and tell Good German Neighbor whatever in order to get rid of him.   Then Foreign Guy finishes the job, go inside and tells his German wife he finished changing the car's tires and he thinks that's the last thing in his chore list to do before going next week for his operation that will keep him for 3 months in bed.

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8 hours ago, jeba said:

Being Germany myself I can´t see what´s wrong with that. He was just trying to be helpful.

 

 

:lol:  That's the point!!! I would never, ever, not in a million years, tell a stranger they are doing something wrong in order to be helpful. It's the last thing I would say.  I find it hard to even tell people I know, friends, that they are doing something wrong! The only people I ever correct at all are my two adult kids.
It's a mentality thing.  Germans think they should do it and wonder why not; the rest of us don't. And of course, NAGALT.

 

(*not all Germans are like that)

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2 hours ago, arunadasi said:

Germans think they should do it and wonder why not

This German certainly does. In my book not pointing out a mistake / error / suboptimal behaviour is tantamount to being unpolite/unhelpful. I´d welcome people to do it to me. Whether I take their advise or not is a different question.

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11 minutes ago, jeba said:

In my book not pointing out a mistake / error / suboptimal behaviour is tantamount to being unpolite/unhelpful.

That is something it took me time getting used to, and once I realized that's how it is usually meant, I didn't find it offensive.  It's an interesting subject which I was recently talking to my friends about in the US when they asked me about cultural differences.  Becuse I am married to a German who grew up mainly in the US it was always there but not quite as strong as here.  On my frig I still have a magnet that my mom gave me umpteen years ago that says "Being married to a German builds character."  😂

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My late husband never did it, but my ex-landlady was constantly doing it. Constantly explaining how I could do this or that better, very forthright and in my view quite intrusive. It used to get on my nerves -- she is such a perfectionist! She must be freaking out in this CV crisis, she is already so pingelich (lovely word that); I can just imagine her going around with her spray and cloth and disinfecting everything. Mind you, I'm a bit like that myself these days.
Also, one of my close friends, whom I haven't seen for ages, is like that; always pointing out what could be better, what could be improved, what I was doing wrong.

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13 minutes ago, BethAnnBitt said:

  On my frig I still have a magnet that my mom gave me umpteen years ago that says "Being married to a German builds character."  😂

 

It does, but in my case it's living in Germany that builds character. My husband was pretty easy going, if a little "stur" (stubborn) in some areas.
But living in Germany was def. good for me, coming from an easy going, happy go lucky culture where things are a little sloppy. I actually enjoyed learning from the perfectionism, learning how to do things thoroughly and precisely (I'm still not good at that) and just pulling up my socks generally. I like to see myself now as a blend of the two extremes.

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6 hours ago, Krieg said:

 

Foreign Guy is putting his winter tyres in early September.   Good German Neighbor approaches him and tells him it is not yet the time to do it.   Foreign Guy smiles and tell Good German Neighbor whatever in order to get rid of him.   Then Foreign Guy finishes the job, go inside and tells his German wife he finished changing the car's tires and he thinks that's the last thing in his chore list to do before going next week for his operation that will keep him for 3 months in bed.

 

It's called minding your own business, something Germans will never understand!!

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3 hours ago, arunadasi said:

pingelich

Immer diese Zugereisten! Das schreibt sich PINGELIG mit einem G wie GEHTGARNICHTWASSIEDAMACHEN am Ende!

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2 hours ago, franklan said:

Immer diese Zugereisten! Das schreibt sich PINGELIG mit einem G wie GEHTGARNICHTWASSIEDAMACHEN am Ende!

 

I've ALWAYS wondered about that!!! Thanks! It's a beautiful word.

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14 hours ago, franklan said:

Immer diese Zugereisten! Das schreibt sich PINGELIG mit einem G wie GEHTGARNICHTWASSIEDAMACHEN am Ende!

 

So yeah, I'm spelling it pingelich from now on. Rug is spelled Teppig, right? 

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It's a regional thing. Since I'm from the Rhein-Baden-Schwaben area, -ich is correct because that's how it's pronounced!

 

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