The "UP Side" of Quarantine

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Yesterday we managed to empty, clean & refill the cupboards in the kitchen that are above the waistline.

Threw out a small number of "havn't used this for years" items.

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Here is a little nugget of information that sort of dropped into my lap.
For weeks now I have been struggling with an English term for "Kurzarbeit" calling it "short work" simply did not feel right.
 
Ahem!
 
The English word for Kurzarbeit is: "Furlough leave!"
 
Apparently from the Dutch word: "Verlof" as in "leave of absense."
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2 hours ago, slammer said:
Here is a little nugget of information that sort of dropped into my lap.
For weeks now I have been struggling with an English term for "Kurzarbeit" calling it "short work" simply did not feel right.
 
Ahem!
 
The English word for Kurzarbeit is: "Furlough leave!"
 
Apparently from the Dutch word: "Verlof" as in "leave of absense."

 

According to google, furlough means that the employee is on unpaid leave but he's officially still employed there.  In Canada, they call this temporary layoff.  The employer does not have to pay notice unless he doesn't call the worker back within a certain number of weeks in which case the temporary layoff becomes permanent.  An employee on temporary layoff can get unemployment benefits.

 

However, not all kurzarbeiter are completely on leave.  Some are working part time.  In that case you might call it reduced hours.  They also do that in Canada when it's slow.  Working a 4 day week, getting 80% salary is still more than unemployment.

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14 minutes ago, LeonG said:

 

According to google, furlough means that the employee is on unpaid leave but he's officially still employed there.  In Canada, they call this temporary layoff.  The employer does not have to pay notice unless he doesn't call the worker back within a certain number of weeks in which case the temporary layoff becomes permanent.  An employee on temporary layoff can get unemployment benefits.

 

However, not all kurzarbeiter are completely on leave.  Some are working part time.  In that case you might call it reduced hours.  They also do that in Canada when it's slow.  Working a 4 day week, getting 80% salary is still more than unemployment.

Furlogh leave (disclaimer for the UK) was only introduced as a term last month with the meaning that your company still pays you for the few hours you are actually on the job.

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4 hours ago, slammer said:

The English word for Kurzarbeit is: "Furlough leave!"

No, you were closer with your earlier direct translation. The English (UK) term is short term working. Employees are given reduced hours and receive reduced pay accordingly. The other pre-existing UK term was/is  lay-off which is effectively unpaid leave. Both of those scenarios were to avoid making someone redundant, so the individual retains their continuity of employment, whilst the employer reduces its wage bill.

The UK's version of "furlough" (which isn't yet finalised) is that the government claims it will reimburse employers for up to 80% of employees' basic gross monthly salary (capped at £2500) for a period between 3 weeks and 3 months (it is anticipated that the three month period may be extended). They are offering a similar scheme for self-employed individuals (not PSC contractors, save insofar as the director is remunerated via PAYE - likely to be a much smaller sum), based on their declared profits.

 

 

 

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In the UK, short term working can only be enforced by employers if there is a pre-existing contractual entitlement to do so, which is why most folk in the UK have never come across it.

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Planning  the planting of the yearly vegetable garden and at least, so far, buying the seeds/starter plants. It was too cold to plant til now so tomorrow is the day to 'dig in.'

 

Noticed how nice my man looked from 2 metres behind as I stood with my solo cart at the REWE check out.

 

Is it really necessary for a couple going shopping to use two carts? One for me and one for you? I ran into this at REWE and Aldi Süd but not at the Baumarkt (we could share a cart). Who cares if couples shopping are closer than 2 metres from one another anyway?

 

Next thing you know, we'll need to wear tags on our fronts that say: I'm with: HIM/HER and then has the photo of your partner/kid whatever on it. :P

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The trolley is to keep distance. No trolley, what's to stop you breathing down the neck of the dude in front. Hence, one grown-up human, one trolley.

 

I assume.

 

Only one of us shops now, to lessen the chances of bringing it home. Although our town is only lightly affected.

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The upside of the strict rules is that for the past few weeks the streets, the Stadtpark, just simply everywhere, especially the usual hang outs of the teenagers (hardly any to be seen) is so clean and free of litter and broken glass. 

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Tired of zapping around tv stations, I went online and discovered the ARD Mediathek and enjoyed watching a 4 part mini-series based on a novel by Siegfried Lenz called 'Der Überlaufer' last night. Got a bit of hand quilting done on the cat's small blanket while watching/listening too! 

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3 hours ago, cybil said:

Tired of zapping around tv stations, I went online and discovered the ARD Mediathek and enjoyed watching a 4 part mini-series based on a novel by Siegfried Lenz called 'Der Überlaufer' last night. Got a bit of hand quilting done on the cat's small blanket while watching/listening too! 

I´ve been trying to watch that for a few days but the feed keeps hanging making it unwatchable.

 

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On 4/1/2020, 11:46:57, slammer said:

Furlogh leave (disclaimer for the UK) was only introduced as a term last month with the meaning that your company still pays you for the few hours you are actually on the job.

Furlogh means a leave of absence or that`s what my dad used to call his leave.

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„ furlong „ was my first thought when I started seeing this „ furlough „ word! The ancient burrow- measuring word!😂

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On 4.4.2020, 20:52:46, slammer said:

I´ve been trying to watch that for a few days but the feed keeps hanging making it unwatchable.

 

I watched it at night and it hung up at the beginning of a few episodes but then went smoothly within a minute or so. Maybe try it again/hang in there? 

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For me Kürzarbeit means I'm catching up on whisky reviews for my website. At least 40 previously written but not yet online are now online and I'm at a point where I need to taste more drams from my 'queue' of about 200.

 

Current online total is 1368.

It's a hard life but someone has to do it.

The best of the recent bunch so far are the 1953 Talisker and a PX Kavalan.

 

Edit: No Limburg whisky fair this year so I won't be adding to my 'queue', as if 200 isn't already 'nuff.

 

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1 hour ago, Malt-Teaser said:

For me Kürzarbeit means I'm catching up on whisky reviews for my website. At least 40 previously written but not yet online are now online and I'm at a point where I need to taste more drams from my 'queue' of about 200.

 

Current online total is 1368.

It's a hard life but someone has to do it.

The best of the recent bunch so far are the 1953 Talisker and a PX Kavalan.

 

This is the kind of support we need at this time!  keep it going Malt!

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