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Bought a cat

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Another innovation, which was delightful, was on the way back, when we were preparing to go through security, an airport staff member told us to go through the family route. So we went. It was fabulous! NO security queues. Just a few families with small kids, and you get through speedily. This is a wonderful development if you are travelling with kids.

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6 minutes ago, arunadasi said:

No. I've passed through Gatwick many times from Dublin, and normally we would all go to the main luggage retrieval area. And we did have to pass through a security area previously; granted, a very simple one for "all EU passports". This has changed.

This is unlike flights from Belfast, which is regarded as a domestic airport. I've done both.


This was the first time that, along the corridor itself, was a single luggage band, just after disembarking. I've never seen this before -- usually we all have to go to the main area.  Gatwick has been renovated and there are some new procedures, and this is one of them. 

 

Trust me, the worker was not just saying the countries "are regarded as one". He was saying they ARE one.

 

But the airport set up is for convenience, flights coming in from multiple places.   Irish and British do not need a passport to travel between the two countries.

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20 minutes ago, snowingagain said:

 

, I found your comments (as did my Irish husband) on complaining about people living on the border having the temerity to cross over it grating. 

 

 

 

Complaining about people having "the temerity to cross the border" is something I have NEVER said! A complete misunderstanding! In normal times I cross back and forth, as do all my family members, all the time! There are so many border crossings and I love the openness of it. 


But in times of Covid 19 everything is different. When two countries have different quarantine measures in place, the stricter one should close the border imo.

I would have liked Monaghan to isolate itself from the rest of Ireland, even, in the early days before we had a single case! This is not some kind of xenophobia. It's being sensible. Just the way China locked off Hubei at the start of their problems. 

 

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2 minutes ago, snowingagain said:

 

But the airport set up is for convenience, flights coming in from multiple places.   Irish and British do not need a passport to travel between the two countries.

 

I'm just saying that it was a new procedure that we had not seen before. It's a good thing; I liked it, as it's much quicker. That was not the problem. In fact there wasn't a problem, just this rather silly man saying that Ireland was part of the UK! He DID say that.

 

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1 hour ago, oscar 63 said:

"'OK, I'll correct myself - he's an ENGLISH (mind you, he didn't say British so I don't believe him) troll who enjoys winding us up.

Putting him on ignore. Have fun talking to yourself.''

 

Metall - when you played hide and seek as a child, were you the one who closed their eyes, thinking no one could then see them?! :lol:

 

 

😀 can guarantee you that is 100% the opposite.

 

No Englishman, Welshman, scot ever said “I’m British”

 

EVER!!!

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Oh yeah sorry, it’s so easy to forget about the Welsh..

 

poor things have to claim being British when abroad as no one knows what their country/nationality  is 😂

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4 hours ago, oscar 63 said:

 

 

😀 can guarantee you that is 100% the opposite.

 

No Englishman, Welshman, scot ever said “I’m British”

 

EVER!!!

You're totally wrong of course. I say this to people all the time. Born In England, Scottish father, Welsh mother. Can't say I'm Scottish as I have never lived there.

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Most of my close friends here are British, I have 2 main groups, one of which is made up mostly of English, 2 Scottish and I'm the token Irish person. The other group is more of a mix, 2 Irish, 2 Scottish and 2 English.  In both groups, I've only ever heard them refer to themselves as Brits or British, none of them define themselves as English or Scottish, at least not when we're together, or maybe it's being in Germany, it's just easier that explaining the differences.

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55 minutes ago, oscar 63 said:

so you should be saying you are English then.

Never. I had a Scottish father.

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25 minutes ago, Tap said:

Most of my close friends here are British, I have 2 main groups, one of which is made up mostly of English, 2 Scottish and I'm the token Irish person. The other group is more of a mix, 2 Irish, 2 Scottish and 2 English.  In both groups, I've only ever heard them refer to themselves as Brits or British, none of them define themselves as English or Scottish, at least not when we're together, or maybe it's being in Germany, it's just easier that explaining the differences.

Around here in Crete amongst the Brits, people just say they‘re going back to the UK to visit family. People never used to use the word UK when I was growing up. It used to be Britain.

There are English, Scots, Welsh and Irish but they are all mixed anyway. Our self-identifying Irish friend grew up in England.

A Scottish friend here even claims to have opened the first Greek restaurant in Ireland way back then!😂

And the Irish pub in town ( now closed ) was owned by a Scot.

 

I have to say all of us/them are over 60 and are more worried about their health and their kids/ grandkids and their pensions than flag waving.

 

None of them/ us is a bitter nationalist and all of us banter away in a friendly way. 

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59 minutes ago, Acton said:

Never. I had a Scottish father.

 

😂 nuff said 

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8 minutes ago, oscar 63 said:

 

😂 nuff said 

I also see from your profile that you are 'British'.

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1 hour ago, Tap said:

Most of my close friends here are British, I have 2 main groups, one of which is made up mostly of English, 2 Scottish and I'm the token Irish person. The other group is more of a mix, 2 Irish, 2 Scottish and 2 English.  In both groups, I've only ever heard them refer to themselves as Brits or British, none of them define themselves as English or Scottish, at least not when we're together, or maybe it's being in Germany, it's just easier that explaining the differences.

A dear friend of mine for 30 years, Patrick, was born in England to Irish parents and I even once visited his Uncle and Aunt in Ireland  and was warmly received.

 

He once remarked: „ John, isn‘t is terrible what we Brits have done historically to us Irish.“

😂

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On 3/23/2020, 5:58:12, LeonG said:

A cousin of mine was getting dogs like that.  Get a dog for xmas, have it put down before the summer vacation so she doesn't have to pay for a kennel.  She was on her 3rd dog when my mom told me that.  I'm not in touch with her so I don't know how often she ended up doing it.

 

Some ppl too keep getting pets but don't have the cash to pay for insurance or meet unexpected vet bills so in that case, they have no choice but to put down or surrender to tierheim.  IMO, if you can't afford it, just don't get one.

 

Good grief, that's terrible. She sounds psychotic..
I'd be tempted to slap them if that was my cousin.

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11 minutes ago, cb6dba said:

Good grief, that's terrible. She sounds psychotic..
I'd be tempted to slap them if that was my cousin.

 

I might have if I'd ran into her shortly after hearing that or I certainly would have said something but I'm really not in touch with her.

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On 2020-03-28, 3:50:30, Acton said:

, so I don't have any 'English' blood flowing through my veins.

 

You probably do though. I get the differences with the home countries, and certainly there are slight cultural differences. But, it’s always amusing to me when Brits pretend they haven’t all been living on the same small island sharing the same gene pool for 1000 years and more. Celts were mainland invaders who mostly replaced the older previous inhabitants (who had themselves replaced the Stonehengers IIRC), and they were in turn mostly intermarried with Anglo-Saxons. IIRC, there is no real ‘pure Celtic’ population anywhere. If I remember correctly further still, from a DNA sample perspective there is no way to clearly discern Scot/Welsh/English genepools (Those distant from Anglo-Saxons got invaded by the Norse). I think Irish are more distinct, and Orkney and Shetlanders are basically Norse/Celt genetically. Then you had French/Norman ruling class and nobility stomping around taking their pick of the native damsels for several centuries. Not to mention post-war migration.

 

No offense, but the UK is probably among the most mongrel nations there are! (And that’s not a bad thing)

 

I’m just Canadian, but by blood, 3/4 of me is British (trifecta). English great grandmother, lived to 99 years, died when I was about 12. Came to Canada in her late teens, kept her accent her whole life, loved watching British TV. She married a norn Irish man. Neither were particularly religious or nationalist, though the kids were raised Catholic. My dad’s mom was of Scottish stock, though watered down with some French-Canadian.

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Alderhill, you are probably right insofar that all humans are related to each other, going back long enough. If anybody here is interested in this subject, I can strongly recommend you reading 'A short history of nearly everything' by Bill Bryson, which puts all this sort of scientific mumbo-jumbo into words that everbody can understand,

In my case, I know that my father's and mother's parents were born in Scotland and Wales, as were their parents and grandparents. That, for me, is as far as it goes and I stick by my original comment.

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On 28.3.2020, 19:10:08, john g. said:

And Boris isn’t English, either. As a born New Yorker, he can only be considered British as per his passport.

By the way, my background is somewhat similar to yours, Acton! Scottish grandfather, Welsh grandmother, Tyke mum, Cockney dad!

What a mess! No wonder I became a nomad!😂😂

Jeez! You get junkyard dogs with less genetic diversity than that.

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