Recruiter / prospective employer wants date of birth?

37 posts in this topic

A recruiter wants my date of birth "before they pass on my information to the prospective employer".

 

So I don't know if it's a standard thing the recruiter collects or if the employer wants to know my age.

 

Is it OK for them to ask? Should I provide it? I don't see how it's relevant (or necessary) and I'm asking specifically because I don't usually provide this on a CV (and I don't remember it ever being an issue).

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Birth date is a bit unusual to collect in the early stages of recruitment. Usually it's for later when a job offer is (about to be) made.

 

It is stripped from the "standard" EU format CV. https://europass.cedefop.europa.eu/editors/de/cv/compose

 

It might be worth asking them why date of birth is part of the recruitment process to rule you in / out of a job selection.

 

There are some types of jobs though, where dob is needed (financial jobs, ceo, exec positions etc...) even in the early stages of recruitment because of the pre-screening that might take place.

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I´d be very surprised if most employers wouldn´t have that as a criterion. After all, it makes a difference for them whether you´re in your early twenties or a year from retirement for most jobs. Just as it makes a difference if you´re a woman of childbearing age or not. Regardless of that in an ideal world it wouldn´t. When my then wife applied for a job her prospective boss told her to have a hysterectomy and to reapply thereafter. That was in the 80ies, but I guess the only difference is that today nobody would dare to say something like that.

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3 hours ago, jeba said:

I´d be very surprised if most employers wouldn´t have that as a criterion. After all, it makes a difference for them whether you´re in your early twenties or a year from retirement for most jobs. Just as it makes a difference if you´re a woman of childbearing age or not. Regardless of that in an ideal world it wouldn´t. When my then wife applied for a job her prospective boss told her to have a hysterectomy and to reapply thereafter. That was in the 80ies, but I guess the only difference is that today nobody would dare to say something like that.

 

I mean, if they need my DOB to estimate my age, I'd say they didn't read my CV. It's not like it doesn't have all the dates of my education and professional experience.

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6 minutes ago, sos-the-rope said:

 

I mean, if they need my DOB to estimate my age, I'd say they didn't read my CV. It's not like it doesn't have all the dates of my education and professional experience.

 

Precisely, so what is your problem with giving your date of birth???

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In one of the companies I worked at I overheard a HR rep mentioning that they started doing thorough background checks on applicants. Maybe they want to rule out the wrong person?

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22 hours ago, sos-the-rope said:

Is it OK for them to ask? Should I provide it? I don't see how it's relevant (or necessary) and I'm asking specifically because I don't usually provide this on a CV (and I don't remember it ever being an issue).

Hiding it is an issue. Puts you down on the list immediately.

And yes, age is unfortunately relevant.

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It seems to be standard on German CVs, so I'm surprised you're surprised. I've been including mine since here since the beginning, unless I'm applying for a position at an international organization.

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Date of birth? Well, normal in daily life! It is also a good way to find out if someone is too. „ old „ for a job - and not only because younger people might be cheaper.

People ARE sometimes too old for a job.

I am 67 and unemployable.

😜

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47 minutes ago, john g. said:

Date of birth? Well, normal in daily life! It is also a good way to find out if someone is too. „ old „ for a job - and not only because younger people might be cheaper.

People ARE sometimes too old for a job.

I am 67 and unemployable.

😜

I´m going to be 60 this november and have a wretched six month contract, thankfully I don´t have the kind of job where a "senior moment" would cause damage. But being unemployable is the stuff of my nightmares.

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21 minutes ago, slammer said:

I´m going to be 60 this november and have a wretched six month contract, thankfully I don´t have the kind of job where a "senior moment" would cause damage. But being unemployable is the stuff of my nightmares.

I'll be 55 next year. An official senior and finally allowed to call my attention issues a 'senior moment' instead. Looking forward to it. Being unemployable is the stuff of my nightmares too, that's why, when someone snarky on the other side of my sevice counter says, 'STILL here?!' when I serve 'em the coffee, I reply 'yes, and I don't plan to be leaving any time soon.' 

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15 hours ago, MikeMelga said:

And yes, age is unfortunately relevant.

 

Unless you're in the US.  Can't ask.

How is it relevant?

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age is relevant, whether you like it or not. As for backgraound checks, (potential) employers would need to know your date of birth to be able to find the correct "Heinz Müller aus Berlin" in their search.

 

I am 63, could retire immediately, if I wanted to  - and just started a new full-time job 1.10.2019, as a mainframe programmer for a large insurance company :) in Munich. At that point, my age was the biggest benefit - the "young folks" don't have the skillset.

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1 hour ago, karin_brenig said:

I am 63, could retire immediately, if I wanted to  - and just started a new full-time job 1.10.2019, as a mainframe programmer for a large insurance company :) in Munich. At that point, my age was the biggest benefit - the "young folks" don't have the skillset.

 

If I am still alive, I expect to milk the 2038 issues which hopefully will be more dramatic than the anti-climax Y2K.

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3 hours ago, catjones said:

 

Unless you're in the US.  Can't ask.

How is it relevant?

Depends on the job, of course. What I see more often is that pre-retirement IT professionals (>58) just don't give a shit any more. So unless the rest of the CV looks awesome, it goes to the trash can. This is only applicable to contractors, we never got an application for a permanent position from a guy over 45!

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2 hours ago, MikeMelga said:

What I see more often is that pre-retirement IT professionals (>58) just don't give a shit any more.

 

As in, the over 58s :

  • don't join in office politics,
  • do stand up for their rights
  • don't stand for young managers who blame workers for mgmt mistakes
  • have so much experience in the field that they understand the big picture
  • they know that an 8hr day is just that
  • know that being professional is not a one sided coin

 

Yes, I went sailing (for a job) as I didn't get any openings

in IT projects once I'd passed that age.

 

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33 minutes ago, HH_Sailor said:

 

As in, the over 58s :

  • don't join in office politics,
  • do stand up for their rights
  • don't stand for young managers who blame workers for mgmt mistakes
  • have so much experience in the field that they understand the big picture
  • they know that an 8hr day is just that
  • know that being professional is not a one sided coin

No, as in:

  • have no pride in their work
  • have no will to learn new things
  • don't care if the outcome has quality or not
  • hide problems from managers, to delay being dismissed

BTW, not a single developer in my team is pushed to work more than 8 hours a day! We even had a case where we were constantly sending a guy home.

 

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11 hours ago, karin_brenig said:

I am 63, could retire immediately, if I wanted to  - and just started a new full-time job 1.10.2019, as a mainframe programmer for a large insurance company :) in Munich. At that point, my age was the biggest benefit - the "young folks" don't have the skillset.

Only banks and insurance companies still maintain technologies from the "good old days" like COBOL :).

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12 minutes ago, LukeSkywalker said:

Only banks and insurance companies still maintain technologies from the "good old days" like COBOL :).

 

COBOL!  Brings back memories as a 2nd year Computer Science Undergraduate (1971/72) with a big stack of punched cards that were my COBOL exercise & hoping (a) that it would be run before the power went off (another of those strikes) and (b) that the card reader would not convert the tidy stack of cards into a set of folded fans.

 

COBOL: how to get so little done in so many lines of code!

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