Brexit, New residence permits

242 posts in this topic

2 hours ago, Dembo said:

He hasn't done anything yet. If you've applied and then move then obviously that complicates things, but you have until the end of June to apply. Just move first. 

 

Apply for what?

 

Germany chose to use a declaratory system.

 

The rights are automatically bestowed upon the applicant come end of 2020 or am i missing what declaratory actually means?

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4 hours ago, RenegadeFurther said:

 

Apply for what?

 

Germany chose to use a declaratory system.

 

The rights are automatically bestowed upon the applicant come end of 2020 or am i missing what declaratory actually means?

 

"Register" if you prefer, or perhaps "Declare". But we all have to send off a form before the end of June, with proof of income and someone above said they had to show proof of health insurance too. It's not exactly automatic bestowal of rights.

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I reckon a lot of folks "flying under the radar" will be flushed out of the long grass. A mate of mine in the Canaries was telling me that the place used to be full of Brits who were never registered at all. They'd spend most of the year there, working cash in hand doing stuff like building work and trades or working remotely for UK companies, using a UK issued EHIC for any medical cover etc. Completely against the rules of course. Now they've all had to just go home.

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4 hours ago, Dembo said:

 

"Register" if you prefer, or perhaps "Declare". But we all have to send off a form before the end of June, with proof of income and someone above said they had to show proof of health insurance too. It's not exactly automatic bestowal of rights.

 

Then it is not declaratory.

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For UK nationals: cut-off date 30 June 2021
If you are a UK national living in Germany on 31 December 2020 and continuing to live in Germany after that date, you must report your residence to the foreigners authority responsible for your place of residence by 30 June 2021 in order to be able to obtain the new residence document. Many authorities enable this to be done online. You do not need to make an application. Registration with the residents’ registration office is not sufficient! We recommend that you do not wait until the last minute to report your residence.

 

https://www.bmi.bund.de/SharedDocs/faqs/EN/topics/constitution/brexit/faqs-brexit.html

 

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1 hour ago, Sumarokov-Elston said:

Registration with the residents’ registration office is not sufficient!

 

It is within Schleswig-Holstein - at least within our Kreis (they wrote just before Christmas stating this).

The rest supposedly takes place automatically.

 

However, 2 years ago (2019) I had submitted the Application for a Residence Permit...

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Have any German cities started handing out appointments for the Aufenthaltskarte-GB yet?

 

Pretty much everyone I know were told by their Kommune last year that they'd automatically be allocated an appointment in the new year (early 2021).

 

Letter: "Sie brauchen im Moment nichts zu veranlassen. Ich komme auf Sie zu... Sie bekommen automatisch per Post eine Einladung zu einem Termin ab dem 01.01.2021..."

 

It's now almost April - still nothing. 

 

For those who attended the appointment already, how did it work? Did they take your photo and fingerprints on-the-spot, or does that come later? (I presume on-the-spot)

 

 

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4 minutes ago, paulwork said:

Have any German cities started handing out appointments for the Aufenthaltskarte-GB yet?

 

Pretty much everyone I know were told by their Kommune last year that they'd automatically be allocated an appointment in the new year (early 2021).

 

It's now almost April - still nothing. 

 

 

You need to contact them.  Your local Ausländeramt.   ASAP.  They replied to my email query I sent in December.  However, my son, who has not contacted them, has heard nothing. 

 

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I /we have. Several times. Each time is the same - don't call us - we'll call you.

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5 minutes ago, snowingagain said:

You need to contact them.  Your local Ausländeramt.   ASAP.  They replied to my email query I sent in December.  However, my son, who has not contacted them, has heard nothing. 

 

Did your son get a letter last year saying "You do not need to do anything. We will contact you early next year and invite you to an appointment"?

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18 minutes ago, paulwork said:

Did your son get a letter last year saying "You do not need to do anything. We will contact you early next year and invite you to an appointment"?

No.  

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19 minutes ago, paulwork said:

Did your son get a letter last year saying "You do not need to do anything. We will contact you early next year and invite you to an appointment"?

No.  

Edit:  Nor I, so wrote in December.  Only just hear back from them though.  Have first appointment this week.

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Interesting statement in the Berlin immigration office FAQ on brexit

https://www.berlin.de/einwanderung/aufenthalt/brexit/artikel.1044828.php

 

It says

Can I apply for an EU Blue Card?

  • Yes. You are entitled to receive the residence permit that gives you the more favorable legal status. According to the Withdrawal Agreement, you can work for an indefinite period of time, while the EU Blue Card can be limited to four years. However, with the EU Blue Card you can use your mobility rights to a wider extent than would be possible with the GB Residence Document, namely also within the EU and the EEA .

 

I will shortly receive the GB card with permanent residency in Germany.

I was trying to figure out what 'mobility rights' are being referred to here? I can see for example, Austria issues Red-White-Red-Plus cards instead of non plus cards. In effect you bypass the first stage. Anyway, might be an interesting choice for some.

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3 hours ago, scook17 said:

I was trying to figure out what 'mobility rights' are being referred to here?

Your GB card gives you the right to reside or work in the country you lived in on Brexit day for as long as you remain a resident.  It gives you no right to work or live in any other EU country.

A Blue Card being an EU document lets you live or work in other EU countries too, but it can be limited to a 4 year period.

What I can't see from that document is if you are allowed a blue card AND a GB card, but I think unless you intend to move to another EU country you're probably not affected either way.

 

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Quote

A Blue Card being an EU document lets you live or work in other EU countries too

 

No, it doesn't. A Blue Card does not grant the holder an automatic right to move to another EU Member State. 

 

 

 

 

 

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11 hours ago, engelchen said:

 

 

No, it doesn't. A Blue Card does not grant the holder an automatic right to move to another EU Member State. 

 

 

 

 

 

The LTR long-term resident permit does however give a kind of "mini" freedom of movement across the EU. 

 

https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/what-we-do/policies/legal-migration/long-term-residents_en.

 

In Germany it is called Daueraufenthaltserlaubnis-EU. It must contain the designation "-EU".

 

It is NOT an ordinary Niederlassungserlaubnis.

 

It is NOT an ordinary Daueraufenthaltserlaubnis.

 

It is the pan-eu agreed long-term resident permit.

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37 minutes ago, paulwork said:

The LTR long-term resident permit does however give a kind of "mini" freedom of movement across the EU. 

 

https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/what-we-do/policies/legal-migration/long-term-residents_en.

 

In Germany it is called Daueraufenthaltserlaubnis-EU. It must contain the designation "-EU".

 

It is NOT an ordinary Niederlassungserlaubnis.

 

It is NOT an ordinary Daueraufenthaltserlaubnis.

 

It is the pan-eu agreed long-term resident permit.

 

You are obviously very confused (again!) <_<

 

 

First of all, @snowingagainmentioned the Blue Card not the DA-EU. Second, the DA-EU is only provides "mini FoM" for the independently wealthy and the retired.

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12 hours ago, engelchen said:

No, it doesn't. A Blue Card does not grant the holder an automatic right to move to another EU Member State. 

I stand corrected. Looking at the EU blue-card website, it's clear that you are right.

 

Quote

Can I work in other EU countries?

  • After 18 months you may move to a different EU country to work in highly-skilled employment. You must apply for a new EU Blue Card in the country you wish to move to.

 

That was the only interpretation of the text on the Berlin site linked that made any sense to me.

The current version of that site says:-

Quote

Can I apply for an EU Blue Card?

  • Yes. You are entitled to obtain the residence title granting you the most favourable legal status. It is true that under the Withdrawal Agreement there is no time restriction on your entitlement to engage in economic activity, whereas the Blue Card may be restricted to four years. However, a Blue Card gives you a broader scope of mobility rights than the GB residence document, since it also covers the EU and EEA.

 

 

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1 hour ago, engelchen said:

 

You are obviously very confused (again!) <_<

 

 

First of all, @snowingagainmentioned the Blue Card not the DA-EU. Second, the DA-EU is only provides "mini FoM" for the independently wealthy and the retired.

 

It seems Engelchen is annoyed they are proved wrong with facts. 

 

Maybe Engelchen would like to prove how the DA-EU is for some "elite" wealthy that they wildly create fantasy suppositions over.

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10 minutes ago, paulwork said:

 

It seems Engelchen is annoyed they are proved wrong with facts. 

 

Maybe Engelchen would like to prove how the DA-EU is for some "elite" wealthy that they wildly create fantasy suppositions over.

 

Quite simply, the DA-EU (unlike FoM for EU citizens) requires sufficient funds to cover living expenses and does not include the automatic right to work.

 

The problem here is not my ignorance of the laws, but rather yours. 

 

The UK is no longer apart of the EU. Deal with it. 

 

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