Getting the Citizenship after studying/living in Germany but having 1 semester studying abroad

5 posts in this topic

Hey people! 

 

I have a big question. 
Right now I'm studying my Bachelor here in Germany (Berlin) and my program requires me to do either an internship abroad or a semester abroad but I have decided to apply for a citizenship after my studies and after living in Germany for about 7ish years. I've already been living in Germany for 2 years, this year would be my third, but now that I have received a confirmation of my exchange semester I am wondering if my 2 years that I was already living here would be thrown away after I come back from the semester abroad. 
Unfortunately I can't keep my apartment where I'm currently living during my stay abroad, therefore I would officially need to do the abmeldung and once I come back (after 5 months) do the anmeldung in my new address. 

I know that the main requirement to get the citizenship is to be living in Germany for about 6-8 years under a visa/residence permit. 

Do you know if by studying abroad for one semester my two years would be wasted? 

I will still be enrolled in my Germany university while studying, so I guess it could be a grey area... 

 

Thank you for your comments guys!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

8 hours ago, indianajoneseg said:

Do you know if by studying abroad for one semester my two years would be wasted? 

 

Is the answer really going to make a difference to your plans? If you might have to wait longer to qualify for citizenship are you going to give up the chance for an exchange semester? 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This document says:

Quote

Seit der Reform des Staatsangehörigkeitsrechts im Jahr 2000 besitzen Personen, die seit mindestens acht Jah­ren rechtmäßig ihren gewöhnlichen Aufenthalt in Deutschland haben, bei Erfüllung bestimm­ter Voraussetzungen einen Anspruch auf Einbürgerung (§ 10 Abs. 1 StAG).

 

"Gewöhnlicher Aufenthalt" (habitual abode) AFAIK means that you need to stay within Germany for more than 183 days per year. If you´ll be away for only 5 months that would mean you still had your habitual abode for that year in Germany. Which would mean you´d still qualify. But I´m not a lawyer and this is only my layman´s take on it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, jeba said:

This document says:

 

"Gewöhnlicher Aufenthalt" (habitual abode) AFAIK means that you need to stay within Germany for more than 183 days per year. If you´ll be away for only 5 months that would mean you still had your habitual abode for that year in Germany. Which would mean you´d still qualify. But I´m not a lawyer and this is only my layman´s take on it.

 

He says that, he will deregister (Abmeldung). The information you gave is for those who are registered in Germany, but traveled outside for longer periods. Deregistration kills the abode.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TurMech said:

 

He says that, he will deregister (Abmeldung). The information you gave is for those who are registered in Germany, but traveled outside for longer periods. Deregistration kills the abode.

I don´t know for sure, but at least for tax purposes it´s not like that. You couldn´t avoid tax liability simply by deregistering even though you stayed in the country for more than 183 days.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now