5,814 posts in this topic

4 hours ago, yesterday said:

he said that there there is no such test. I am interested, can I get one ?

Not to my (quite dated) knowledge. There are tests for specific functions of your immune system such as e. g. testing how much/how fast macrophages can dispose of particles but these are merely experimental and not used for clinical purposes.

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8 hours ago, Frantic said:

 

As far as I know and I saw, in Munich they are closed.

Different regulations in different bundeslands.

They`re talking about maybe making them the same all over but just so much talk at the moment you never know what to believe.

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On 4/12/2020, 12:20:25, fraufruit said:

Himself believes the Baumärkte are closed. I will let him continue with that belief.

 

 

Yes, they got closed because people were viewing them as a place to go for an outing with the family, and thus putting other people and the staff at risk.

 

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9 hours ago, yesterday said:

How do you know how good your immune system is ?

I know mine's not very good because it's been trying to kill me for 25 years. I now try to kill it back it with drugs and we seem to have reached a stand-off.

 

Of course it's not that simple, or not as simple as good and not good, or strong and weak. It might be that the immunosuppresants I take bring my immune system back into line and stop it over-reacting, which is something that's been reported in the worst cases of Covid-19. 

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10 hours ago, yesterday said:

 

thing is how do you know how good your immune system is 

 

I went to my works doctor, and asked him for a test on my immune system, he said that there there is no such test. I am interested, can I get one ?

 

The only thing you can do, is eat healthy stuff and exercise and get enough sleep

the rest is genetic make up

How do you know how good your immune system is ?

I think through a blood test they can see how many leukocytes you have in your body but that won't tell you if they're effective. They can also check how much Immunoglobin you have floating around in your blood as well but that will just show if you have enough and not whether they are effective. But it's a start.

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1 hour ago, robinson100 said:

 

Yes, they got closed because people were viewing them as a place to go for an outing with the family, and thus putting other people and the staff at risk.

 

My local one has strict controls at the door. One in, one out. No kids allowed. Tradespeople get priority. 

 

Personally I think it's high time it was made compulsory to wear a facemask in buildings to which the public have access.

 

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, yesterday said:

 

thing is how do you know how good your immune system is 

 

I went to my works doctor, and asked him for a test on my immune system, he said that there there is no such test. I am interested, can I get one ?

 

The only thing you can do, is eat healthy stuff and exercise and get enough sleep

the rest is genetic make up

How do you know how good your immune system is ?

 

Sometimes it's just an intelligent guess. I haven't had a cold or flu  since I was a child, and I was the only one of my colleagues, when I was working, who never caught the latest bug. I'm not on medication for anything and I have a healthy lifestyle, diet, Yoga, breathing, meditation etc. Last time I remember having flu was in the sanatorium in boarding school. I had hepatitis A when I was 20. Everyone in the house had it. 

 

But yes, genetic makeup has a lot to do with it. I lived on a different continent from my mother all my adult life and as I am an only child, I was so grateful that she had no health problems. She died age 96, and she didn't even have a GP in the country, no doctor knew her, and when she died we had to contact the doctor of a neighbour to come and confirm death, as she had never seen a doctor.

We both have/had joint issues, though.

 

It doesn't mean I'm cocky about it, just thankful. I realise I'm just at risk, and as risky, as anyone else (and not only for covid 19), and I follow the rules. I'm in the "at risk" segment of the population, due to age.

 

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"

There are more than 23,000 Americans dead because of coronavirus and more than half a million infected - and remember that, in early March, Donald Trump was saying there were a handful of cases, but that would soon be down to zero.

Yet Donald Trump walked into the briefing room with scores to settle with the media. This wasn't about the dead, the desperately sick, the people fearful of catching the virus. This was about him. And more particularly his profound sense of grievance that the media has been critical of his handling of Covid-19."

 

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-52276004

 

If you support or supported Trump, you own this too.

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1 hour ago, arunadasi said:

 

Sometimes it's just an intelligent guess. I haven't had a cold or flu  since I was a child, and I was the only one of my colleagues, when I was working, who never caught the latest bug. I'm not on medication for anything and I have a healthy lifestyle, diet, Yoga, breathing, meditation etc. Last time I remember having flu was in the sanatorium in boarding school. I had hepatitis A when I was 20. Everyone in the house had it. 

 

But yes, genetic makeup has a lot to do with it. I lived on a different continent from my mother all my adult life and as I am an only child, I was so grateful that she had no health problems. She died age 96, and she didn't even have a GP in the country, no doctor knew her, and when she died we had to contact the doctor of a neighbour to come and confirm death, as she had never seen a doctor.

We both have/had joint issues, though.

 

It doesn't mean I'm cocky about it, just thankful. I realise I'm just at risk, and as risky, as anyone else (and not only for covid 19), and I follow the rules. I'm in the "at risk" segment of the population, due to age.

 

 

I don’t think I’m cocky about it at all. I’ve also never had a flu vax or a vax for chicken pox/shingles. I do think it’s genetic. My mother and grandmother never had the chicken pox, despite taking care of their other kids. I was exposed so many times and I never got it. I always had strep when I was a kid. I had a very strange virus when I first moved to Australia and I was sure it was strep. It wasn’t and no one knew what it was. 

 

I have a freaky immune system. That being said, this virus is completely new, and I don’t think any immune system can work around new germs. So I stay inside. What is this? Week 3 of lockdown? 

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1 minute ago, klingklang77 said:

 

I don’t think I’m cocky about it at all. I’ve also never had a flu vax or a vax for chicken pox/shingles. I do think it’s genetic. My mother and grandmother never had the chicken pox, despite taking care of their other kids. I was exposed so many times and I never got it. I always had strep when I was a kid. I had a very strange virus when I first moved to Australia and I was sure it was strep. It wasn’t and no one knew what it was. 

 

I have a freaky immune system. That being said, this virus is completely new, and I don’t think any immune system can work around new germs. So I stay inside. What is this? Week 3 of lockdown? 

 

Now entering third week of lockdown, but before that, actually since early March, I was pretty much isolating, seeing only my son, daughter, granddaughter and son-in-law. Since proper lockdown was imposed in Ireland, the last three have been eliminated. I live with my son and he goes to work so I am not exactly "cocooned", though! The only people I see outside the house are supermarket cashiers. But I am allowed that.

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7 hours ago, jeba said:

That´s highly unlikely. There are other explanations for those Korean results. E.g. like they hadn´t really been negative before but the then tests weren´t done correctly (which may well happen as the test - if done correctly can be quite painful (9 min into the video therehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekCWWjgUjbk&t=603s is a patient´s record of it) so that patients don´t cooperate). Or that the suspected reinfection was merely based on PCR tests which can only show that there is viral RNA - which isn´t the same as "living" virus (e.g. it may well be positive in stool for several weeks but the is no "living" virus). Or that even though the patients were no longer sick there was still some virus remaining in their bodies - which doesn´t necessarily mean they were ill or could spread it (like e. g. varicella virus which may remain in your body for the rest of your life without necessarily making you sick as long as your immune system is containing it).

 

Highly unlikely but it's happening. People have had covid and tested positive. They have gotten well and then caught it again, testing positive again. That is what I was talking about.

 

I had rubella twice.

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If we ever develop a vaccine the next thing to deal with will be the anti-vaxxers, which seem to be a lot.

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27 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

Highly unlikely but it's happening.

So far there is no proof that these are reinfections and as I tried to explain it´s unlikely they are. Just because you find viral RNA doesn´t mean there is an active infection. E. g. you´ll find it in stool samples a for up to 3 weeks after the symptoms have faded away.

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26 minutes ago, Krieg said:

If we ever develop a vaccine the next thing to deal with will be the anti-vaxxers, which seem to be a lot.

Just round them all up,put them on an island somewhere with a couple of infected people and let god sort it out.

That`s the stage it`s got to with anti-vaxxers now.

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36 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

 

Highly unlikely but it's happening. People have had covid and tested positive. They have gotten well and then caught it again, testing positive again. That is what I was talking about.

 

I had rubella twice.

 

I'm wondering -- have they just tested positive, and were asymptomatic,  or did they actually become sick again, with all the horrible symptoms? And of course, are they  infectious again?

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Numbers in most of Europe are not very encouraging. Fatality peaks have been reached in multiple countries but bringing fatality counts to zero is unfortunately not exponential. In some cases, not even linear, it just looks like a plateau was reached and will remain there for a long time. Example: in Italy the dropdown is +/- linear, but at this rate it will take 2 more weeks to bring fatalities below 200.

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The problem is the test is not 100 % reliable, so testing positive is only a good indication, unless you test over several days do just have a good indication. Because there are not enough tests available, they probably only test once.

 

So, when when people tested positive then recover, then get it again, you do not really know they had it in the first place, because they do not do enough tests.

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there is interesting research on immune systems and COVID

 

On 5 live yesterday a doctor was describing how often COVID ''locks up'' a patients immune system, it goes into overdrive, akin to septsis

 

Which explains why children, with less developed immune systems, (don't I know it, as a primary teacher of a class of 20 8/9 year old kids who each can catch > 5 colds a year) are less likely to be severely affected

 

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2020/03/coronavirus-spares-most-kids-these-theories-may-help-explain-why/ 

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