6,124 posts in this topic

4 minutes ago, lisa13 said:

 

where were you?

 

 

All of that and more...Like I said, don't get me started.

 

I was living and working in Colorado Springs. I had a fall skiing and really hurt my shoulder, went to an emergency clinic (I had no GP) the following day as the pain got worse I was seen very quickly and Xrayed and they found a vertical crack in the bone in the arm all the way up to ball joint in my shoulder, they put my arm in a sling and recommended a specialist where I made an appointment for the following day. The specialist recommended no surgery but a course of physio starting 4 weeks later to wear down the scaring that would occur in the ball joint, it worked but was painful. About 10 years earlier on a business trip to the Boston area (Framingham) I had a underlying condition flare up requiring minor surgery and was hospitalised for 5 days, also no complaints.The surgery had been planned in the UK but kept getting cancelled, so counted myself fortunate to get it done in the USA.:D

Sorry to hear you have had such bad experiences.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, keith2011 said:

I was living and working in Colorado Springs. I had a fall skiing and really hurt my shoulder, went to an emergency clinic (I had no GP) the following day as the pain got worse I was seen very quickly and Xrayed and they found a vertical crack in the bone in the arm all the way up to ball joint in my shoulder, they put my arm in a sling and recommended a specialist where I made an appointment for the following day. The specialist recommended no surgery but a course of physio starting 4 weeks later to wear down the scaring that would occur in the ball joint, it worked but was painful. About 10 years earlier on a business trip to the Boston area (Framingham) I had a underlying condition flare up requiring minor surgery and was hospitalised for 5 days, also no complaints.The surgery had been planned in the UK but kept getting cancelled, so counted myself fortunate to get it done in the USA.:D

Sorry to hear you have had such bad experiences.

 

for broken bones, treatment is actually pretty good.  I honestly don't know anyone who ever had problems with that.

 

left in the hospital for 5 days is practically unheard of.  I landed such a stay after being hit by a car and almost having my leg ripped off - thankfully my uncle was resident at the hospital which helped keep me in house and got me treatment with the best surgeon.  I was admitted to my uncle's hospital after being sent home from an ER the night before as even with a big gaping bloody wound, I was not going to die and it would be "better" if I got treated in my own county. So the ER instructions were "keep it moist - use this saline - and go find a doctor in the morning to treat you.  good luck."  My good luck was knowing my uncle.

 

The ones I outlined, I was only involved in the ones in Boston, none of which were severe, and even then, I was very much aware and thankful that I had "good coverage".  My docs in Boston were actually quite good - I lucked out - but seeing them was a challenge to say the least.  The rest were relatives in different states, also with "good coverage".

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

 

The Federal Emergency Management Agency asked the Pentagon for 100,000 body bags, a chilling request as the COVID-19 pandemic spirals.

Known as mortuary pouches, the heavy-duty zippered bags are typically used in the military to contain the remains of troops killed in combat. Wednesday, more than 1,000 people died of the coronavirus in the USA, raising the death toll over 5,000. A week ago, the total was less than 1,300. 

"The Department of Defense and the Defense Logistics Agency have a long-standing arrangement with FEMA to procure key commodities from DLA's industrial partners during crisis response operations,” Air Force Lt. Col. Michael Andrews, a Pentagon spokesman, said in a statement Thursday. “DLA is currently responding to FEMA's prudent planning efforts for 100,000 pouches to address mortuary contingencies on behalf of state health agencies."

 

 

I hope the medical professionals don't steal them.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great article (UK based but all relevant)

 

in summation: an estimated two thirds of those accounted for under COVID deaths would have died shortly after, anyways

 

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-51979654

 

''What about the impact of the lockdown?

 

The lockdown, itself, however could cost lives.

 

Prof Robert Dinwall, from Nottingham Trent University, says "the collateral damage to society and the economy" could include:

 

mental health problems and suicides linked to self-isolation

heart problems from lack of activity

the impact on health from increased unemployment and reduced living standards

Others have also pointed to the health cost from steps such as delaying routine operations and cancer screening.

 

Meanwhile, University of Bristol researchers say the benefit of a long-term lockdown in reducing premature deaths could be outweighed by the lost life expectancy from a prolonged economic dip.

 

And the tipping point, they say, is a 6.4% decline in the size of the economy - on a par with what happened following the 2008 financial crash.

 

It would see a loss of three months of life on average across the population because of factors from declining living standards to poorer health care.''

 

 

My two pennies - 

We are lucky. We live on a park, are eating better (if admittedly more than necessary) and have room and a garden to exercise. But others around the world..

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very good article, oscar! One of our neighbours, a Greek lady, Eva, lives in a small house- really small, with her husband and the daughter is visiting.

She keeps leaving the house to wander around the streets. Nothing to see in the streets especially- everything closed - but a sign of the times...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, oscar 63 said:

mental health problems and suicides linked to self-isolation

heart problems from lack of activity

the impact on health from increased unemployment and reduced living standards

 

3 things that Trump has emphasized. So why is the death rate higher and climbing?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found the BBC one profoundly depressing.

 

The usual point of the death rate to the fore, whereas it is the ability of the health service to cope which is what matters. If by allowing it to rip through the population unhindered, you have no effective healthcare for anyone during that period, then that is the disaster.

 

If by slowing the numbers, you bring cases down to within the capability of the health system, then the wider effects are not so drastic.

 

Stopping all unnecessary procedures to make space for Covid-19 patients is not problematic. Being unable to fulfill basic requirements for people already in the system, or new patients, is not OK.

 

The NHS was already in a dire situation before Corona.

 

If people were less idiotic then enforced social isolation would not be necessary - we would all be respectful of situations and behave appropriately. 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, kiplette said:

If people were less idiotic then enforced social isolation would not be necessary - we would all be respectful of situations and behave appropriately. 

 

But people are idiotic. We could do what Duterte has done, order the people who aren't behaving to be shot. I think other ways of enforcement are betteer.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, oscar 63 said:

Great article (UK based but all relevant)

 

in summation: an estimated two thirds of those accounted for under COVID deaths would have died shortly after, anyways

 

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-51979654

 

''What about the impact of the lockdown?

 

The lockdown, itself, however could cost lives.

 

Prof Robert Dinwall, from Nottingham Trent University, says "the collateral damage to society and the economy" could include:

 

mental health problems and suicides linked to self-isolation

heart problems from lack of activity

the impact on health from increased unemployment and reduced living standards

Others have also pointed to the health cost from steps such as delaying routine operations and cancer screening.

 

Meanwhile, University of Bristol researchers say the benefit of a long-term lockdown in reducing premature deaths could be outweighed by the lost life expectancy from a prolonged economic dip.

 

And the tipping point, they say, is a 6.4% decline in the size of the economy - on a par with what happened following the 2008 financial crash.

 

It would see a loss of three months of life on average across the population because of factors from declining living standards to poorer health care.''

 

 

My two pennies - 

We are lucky. We live on a park, are eating better (if admittedly more than necessary) and have room and a garden to exercise. But others around the world..

Now I´m calling that BULLSHIT!

 

Here is one example on how BULLSHIT that article is: "...delaying routine operations and cancer screening." <-- well, too bad for cancer screening, but what do you say to ACTUAL cancer patients that have to delay chemotherapy because they can´t risk having their immune system down???

 

Also, if you avoid lockdown, hospitals would be even MORE crowded, leading to a complete collapse and the whole society would just REFUSE to work at some point, leading again to the SAME LOCKDOWN!

 

FACE IT! Lockdown is inevitable! The question is if you do it NOW of after millions die!

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eddie Large... one half of the UKs 70s/80S comedey due has passed away from Covid19...

 

TBH, I had forgotten they existed...But now... I have to say, they were pretty good... 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was surprised to see that news yesterday.  Mainly because I thought they had both died ages ago.

 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, MikeMelga said:

Also, if you avoid lockdown, hospitals would be even MORE crowded, leading to a complete collapse and the whole society would just REFUSE to work at some point, leading again to the SAME LOCKDOWN!

 

 

What he said. The suggestion seems to be that the health system refuses to treat anyone with COVID-19; they test you and if you test positive you're sent home to die, or not, and that means the health system can get on with what it normally does. And that's just not going to be morally acceptable to anyone.

 

If you rule that out then the health system is always going to be overwhelmed, and that's obviously bad at any time. At least with a lock down people aren't likely to be getting into road accidents.

 

 

 

 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In even less cheerful news, France reported 1,355 deaths yesterday - that's worse than any one day in Italy. However the number of new cases has fallen sharply - now over 2 weeks since their lockdown started I think.

 

Germany's new cases seems to be going up again after a few days where it looked like it was decreasing. And the number of deaths is getting more each day.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Keleth said:

Have you ?

Funny so often in thread where something is brought up your stock answer is "I lived there".Damn you`re well travelled.Or a Google expert.

 

Maybe a better question is what is her country of origin and how is it handling the pandemic and healthcare delivery overall. 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now