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US Citizens travelling to the EU starting 2021

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US citizens will have to register to travel to the EU starting in 2021.

 

' Starting on January 1, 2021, all U.S. citizens who want to travel to the 26 members of Europe’s Schengen Zone will need to register with the European Travel Information and Authorization System (ETIAS) or risk being turned away at the border. '

 

 

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1 hour ago, tor said:

US citizens will have to register to travel to the EU starting in 2021.

 

...

 

 

 

 

Not just US citizens, but those from:

 

  • Albania
  • Andorra
  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Argentina
  • Australia
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Brazil
  • Brunei
  • Canada
  • Chile
  • Colombia
  • Costa Rica
  • Dominica
  • El Salvador
  • Georgia
  • Grenada
  • Guatemala
  • Honduras
  • Hong Kong S.A.R
  • Israel
  • Japan
  • Kiribati
  • Macao S.A.R
  • Malaysia
  • Marshall Islands
  • Mauritius
  • Mexico
  • Micronesia
  • Moldova
  • Monaco
  • Montenegro
  • Nauru
  • New Zealand
  • Nicaragua
  • North Macedonia
  • Palau
  • Panama
  • Paraguay
  • Peru

 

  • Saint Kitts and Nevis
  • Saint Lucia
  • Saint Vincent
  • Samoa
  • Serbia
  • Seychelles
  • Singapore
  • Solomon Islands
  • South Korea
  • Taiwan 
  • Timor Leste
  • Tonga
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • Tuvalu
  • Ukraine
  • United Arab Emirates
  • United States of America
  • Uruguay
  • Vanuatu
  • Venezuela

 

With maybe UK to be added to the list (depending on negotiations)

 

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52 minutes ago, klingklang77 said:

Is this just for tourists? I have residency in Germany. 

 

Yes.  It is a registration system for those previously allowed into the EU for 90 days without any formalities.

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5 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

So will one be prompted to register when purchasing a flight ticket or what?

no, read TOR's original post and the link, tells you what you must do.

 

Sounds a bit like applying for a VISA, but not as complicated, Like applying for a VISA, you a  apply separately and then maybe get your flight.

All it seems to do it check your criminal/ terrorist record before giving you permission to come to europe before you get here.

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I did read the link. I'm thinking about the many who may be caught unawares. Surely the airlines will inform people when they book.

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On 26/01/2020, 15:26:15, fraufruit said:

I did read the link. I'm thinking about the many who may be caught unawares. Surely the airlines will inform people when they book.

It's the equivalent of an ESTA. Most airlines will prompt you, as they do with an ESTA,  but you need to be aware that the responsibility of having your paperwork in order *always* lies with you. So if for any reason you get caught out, the airline (or any other travel operator, i.e. cruises) does not have to give you your money back. The airline cannot know your immigration status when you book, so any warnings will be fairly generic.

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must admit, I thought the airline - normally checks that you have the papier work, you need to get into your destination country, because if  not - they have to fly you back free of charge on the next available flight.

 

From my experience they never ask when you book a flight, but always ask, at check-in, if you have the paperwork to legally stay in the destination country, even for short trips.

 

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If you are flying in from the States for example they will check your details and if you don't have the Visa you can't fly. There is no free flight in the way you mean.

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please read here

https://airlines.iata.org/analysis/document-verification-travel-trouble

 

if an airline flies you to a territory that you are not supposed to be in, and therefore you get refused entry. The airline has to fly you back to your origen at the airlines expense.

ie if BA ( British Airways ) flies a person to the US and the US refuses permission that person to enter the US, then BA must take you back without cost - as BA should have checked you are allowed to fly there, before letting you on the airplane.

We are talking in the mistake case, when the airline does not check that you are allowed to enter the US ( no VISA )  before flying you there, therefore the airline is at fault and has to take you back free of charge.

The EU is only doing the same in reverse

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Maybe I should have said the airlines should check visas etc. I have worked in a couple of airports and there was a lot of pressure with Visa checks. You're right if the airline makes a mistake then of course they have to fly the passenger back.

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The question was about what happens at booking time. By the time you reach the airport where the airline will look at your passport/residence/visa status with a fine tooth comb it's too late.

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