Taking wife's surname after surrendering nationality

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Hello Toytown,

 

Me and my wife both are foreigners in Germany and I've been living here for quite a while and in a few months I'll have the possibility of taking Germany citizenship.

As I don't want to have two different names in family, I'd like to take my wife's surname as family name. I can't do that in my own country as it is a really length process and I've to be there the whole time. I will be surrendering my nationality soon, during this process is there any way that I can take her name and completely drop my last name? For example if her name is AA  BB and my name is CC DD, can I take CC BB as my new name when I surrender my nationality?

 

Thanks in advance

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Contact your local Standesamt (in your local Rathaus). Tell them you need information about a Namensänderung. 

 

 

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You can change your name easily when you get married.  So you should have done it then!

 

There are methods for changing your name when you are nationalised as German, but there are rules and you can't just choose what you want.

https://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_bgbeg/englisch_bgbeg.html

 

Quote

 

 

Where a person under an applicable foreign law has obtained a name and the name is henceforth governed by German law, the person may, by a declaration given before the Registrar of Births, Marriages and Deaths,

1.  determine a first and a family name from out of the name

2.  choose a first or a family name where such name does not exist

3.  give up components of the name that German law does not provide for

4.  adopt the original version of a name that has been modified according to the sex or the family relationship

5.  accept a German version of his or her first or his or her family name; where such a version of his or her first name does not exist, he or she can accept new first names.

Where the name is a marital name or a life-partnership name, during the subsistence of the marriage or of the life partnership, only both spouses or life partners may give the declaration.

(2) Subarticle 1 is applicable mutatis mutandis as to the formation of a name under German law, if it is derived from a name which has been obtained under an applicable foreign law.

(3) § 1617c of the Civil Code shall apply mutatis mutandis.

(4) The declarations made under Subarticles 1 and 2 need to be publicly authenticated or certified, unless they have been made before a German Registrar of Births, Marriages and Deaths.

 

 

 

So basically it depends on your name, how it translates into German, if there is an equivalent German name, etc.

 

So you would have to ask at the time of your application for German citizenship.

 

But according to this:

https://www.palm-bonn.de/eindeutschung.htm

 

Quote

Family names are subject to stricter standards than first names. According to Art. 47 I 1 No. 5, 2nd Ed. EGBGB, only a first name can be changed to a completely new name 

 

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On 7/13/2019, 12:33:16, europaeuropa said:

If you are German, there is no such thing as a real name change on your Germany-issued documents. The best you can do, even for the components of your name that are "allowed" to be changed - is to move them a few milimetres further across or down on your Germany-issued document.

 

There is a field on both German passports and Personalausweis cards called "Geburtsname". So all that happens, even if marrying and taking a different name, is that that part of the old name STILL remains visible, but gets shifted a few milimetres across to a different field. No such field exists on any other EU27 ID card/passport. Germany is, unfortunately, the odd one out here. Sorry to break it to you. 

 

A warning to everyone considering citizenship, or even Germans wishing to get married and change name at the Standesamt. You will be paying 1000s for a "not real" name change, but for basically shifting a component of your old name a few milimetres across on your ID documents. It will still remain visible. For life.

https://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/topic/237697-change-of-name-by-german-in-uk/?do=findComment&comment=3762670.

 

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If I am understanding correctly you were married in Pakistan. You said it is too difficult for you to change your name there.  But right now, today, the Pakistani rules govern your name and any changes that you want to make to it, not the German laws.  If you were to have the name on your Pakistani passport that you would like then I think that you would have a case for asking the Germans to recognize that name.  Otherwise it will be very difficult since the German authorities are very strict on names.  And having names on documents and health insurance paperwork all line up is very important.  (Perhaps tha Pakistani Embassy in Germany can help you.) 

 

I have a non-confirming name and I have only been able to push it through on my paperwork in Germany because I am currently a US citizen and have the names I want on my US passport.  For German purposes my birth certificate and my passport don't line up.  It was a real hassle.  Best of luck.

 

 

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I dont see why anyone would want to change their name to their Wifes name unluess...

 

1...You are trying to hide or cover a bad past...

 

2... You have a head Like a "Pink Lady" apple and your name is William Patell... 

 

3... You are a wanker... 

 

 

 

kurtw.jpeg

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7 hours ago, SpiderPig said:

I dont see why anyone would want to change their name to their Wifes name unluess...

And why are you´re telling us what you think? How exactly does this help the OP?

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20 hours ago, BethAnnBitt said:

 For German purposes my birth certificate and my passport don't line up.

 

This is true for the majority of all married women. I took my husband's name some years after we got married. But mine is a much different case than the OP's so I'll shut up now.

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They are always aggravated that I have been allowed to replace my given middle name with my maiden name.  It drives them nuts!  They go "what happened to your middle name? where has it gone?".  They have so much trouble accepting that we can do whatever we want across the pond. :D

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Here in Greece, Beth, on all official documents eg bank book, at the notary etc..my name is John Ernest Gunn. Ernest was my Dad´s first name...not mine and still isn´t! Your middle name is your Dad´s first name...the way it is here...cute in a way!

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9 hours ago, john g. said:

Your middle name is your Dad´s first name...the way it is here...cute in a way!

That´s not uncommon in Germany as well. My middle name is my dad´s first name as well.

There must have been a law change regarding names since in my ID and passport names are now in alphabetical order so that now my "actual" first name (the one which is first on my birth certificate and which I´v been using all my life) has now become my middle name.

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9 hours ago, BethAnnBitt said:

They have so much trouble accepting that we can do whatever we want across the pond

So how can someone find you if they´re only known to them under a name you´re no longer using? Think e. g. a creditor of a bailiff?

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3 hours ago, jeba said:

So how can someone find you if they´re only known to them under a name you´re no longer using? Think e. g. a creditor of a bailiff?

 

Passport number?   Einwohnermelderamt... ?

 

I could be wrong.. 

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2 hours ago, SpiderPig said:

 

Passport number?   Einwohnermelderamt... ?

 

I could be wrong.. 

2 hours ago, SpiderPig said:

 

Passport number?   Einwohnermelderamt... ?

 

I could be wrong.. 

I doubt there will be a Einwohnermeldeamt in the US, which I was talking about, given that BethAnnBit is American. And a passport number doesn´t tell you where the holder of the passport has their abode. Plus passport numbers can change or you could have more than one passport. I wouldn´t want to be e. g. a single mom having to chase the dad of my child for maintenance there.

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7 hours ago, jeba said:

So how can someone find you if they´re only known to them under a name you´re no longer using? Think e. g. a creditor of a bailiff?

 

There is simply not a tradition of individuals being accessible at leisure to 'the authorities'. There is de facto no compulsory national ID, either. (Though it can get tricky, just search youtube for "sovereign citizens getting owned" and don't forget the popcorn). Things are of course different nowadays with digital records, and official name changes are on the record as well. 

 

 

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For the US (don't know about Canada): the drivers license is the defacto ID, and for those who can't drive they can obtain a state ID.  I got my first DL at 14.  These days we can also get passport cards to use as ID.  

 

It's quite easy to find people digitally with all their many names present (my parents gave me a nickname (hence BA) just to complicate life).  When one applies for credit or anything requiring a credit check one fills out previous names (such as a maiden name or a nickname).  Fortuantely I've never had creditors or bailiffs go after me.

 

In relatively few instances must/does one go to court and legally change a name.  As long as one begins to use a name and without intent to defraud it becomes valid.  After I married I brought my marriage certificate along to the DL bureau and requested a new license replacing my given middle name with my maiden name and taking on my husband's family name.  My husband moved to the US at 6 and began using the English version of his given German first name, which is now on his naturalization papers and passport.  I have frankly wondered why the German bureaucrats routinely want to ask their supervisors about my name discrepancies and not about his.  Sexism?  😉

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In Canada, the driving licence is also the main ID card..

A problem for my non driver friend- on a flight from Toronto to Ottawa. She had no photo ID, and they finally accepted a Costco card!

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On 28/01/2020, 16:45:52, BethAnnBitt said:

 My husband moved to the US at 6 and began using the English version of his given German first name, which is now on his naturalization papers and passport.  I have frankly wondered why the German bureaucrats routinely want to ask their supervisors about my name discrepancies and not about his.  Sexism?  😉

This might be because the concept of Germanising(?) your first name when you take German citizenship exists. I know a Lilyana who became a Liliane, no problem. So they won't be surprised when seeing it the other way around.

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