Cholesterol values - question for the Doctors

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Maybe someone can help me.

 

It seems my fitness has saturated and I can`t seem to be able to push harder than 260 Watts (average) per hour.

 

These are my issues 

 

1) I have lost a lot of weight so I might not be able to generate as much power. Cardio Vascular system seems ok, but the lactic acid build up is what is making me stop or go slower.

 

2) Mental Block. I suspect my mind is playing tricks on me. So I go at 310 Watts for 4 minutes and even though I can go longer (some pain in the legs) I just stop for no real reason. Not sure why or what I can do to go further.

 

How do you go to the next level? Ideally I would like to go at 300 watts for 1 hour but I am now stuck on 260 Watts and can`t go much further.

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On 1/5/2021, 5:52:18, RenegadeFurther said:

 

I can generate an average of 260 Watts over a 1 hour period, so I might now be in okay shape.

 

With the weight ratio it is about 3.5W/kg.

3.5W/Kg is nothing to sniff at. should be able to fly up those hills plenty quick.

i'm at ~3W/Kg but i'm trying to maintain the FTP, but drop some of the fat, pushing harder just seems to hurt more.

 

also if you do a structured training plan and remember the rest days that can make an improvement as well

 

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12 hours ago, RenegadeFurther said:

Maybe someone can help me.

 

It seems my fitness has saturated and I can`t seem to be able to push harder than 260 Watts (average) per hour.

 

These are my issues 

 

1) I have lost a lot of weight so I might not be able to generate as much power. Cardio Vascular system seems ok, but the lactic acid build up is what is making me stop or go slower.

 

2) Mental Block. I suspect my mind is playing tricks on me. So I go at 310 Watts for 4 minutes and even though I can go longer (some pain in the legs) I just stop for no real reason. Not sure why or what I can do to go further.

 

How do you go to the next level? Ideally I would like to go at 300 watts for 1 hour but I am now stuck on 260 Watts and can`t go much further.


I’d tell you to forget about FTP for a while, go out and cycle. Enjoy the sport and being outside and the mental block goes away. Oh, and join Strava if you haven’t already - the competition and encouragement you get from others helps. The weather is not a problem with the right equipment, I’ve been out cycling on last Thursday, Friday and Sunday - the snow makes an otherwise flat trail  feel like a long uphill cycle. Or go running.

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Why do men have to measure everything? Does it stem from having to know how they compare to other men's stems?

@RF: maybe you have just reached the peak of your potential and there is nowhere to go from where you are now? :ph34r:

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3 hours ago, optimista said:

Why do men have to measure everything? Does it stem from having to know how they compare to other men's stems?

@RF: maybe you have just reached the peak of your potential and there is nowhere to go from where you are now? :ph34r:

it's important to know *for me*, because you can use it to train effectively with.

just messing around on the bike and going out cycling i was always at 2w/kg, i did a test, some proper training, and now i'm at 3.

 

why is this important? because i can go for longer cycles, in a quicker time, and spend time with my partner that doesn't cycle.

if i didn't have the measurements and didn't do the specific training i'd be out for longer.

 

does this make sense?

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6 hours ago, optimista said:

Why do men have to measure everything? Does it stem from having to know how they compare to other men's stems?

@RF: maybe you have just reached the peak of your potential and there is nowhere to go from where you are now? :ph34r:

 

i take this comment is just like all your other comments.

 

"I don`t know how to contribute to this discussion but will chip in anyway"

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Yawn. Dismissive. Disparaging.

 

Ironically, a really useful comment.

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8 hours ago, optimista said:

Why do men have to measure everything? Does it stem from having to know how they compare to other men's stems?

@RF: maybe you have just reached the peak of your potential and there is nowhere to go from where you are now? :ph34r:


I’m always reminded of a scene from Karate Kid (the original and only real one): 

 

- Daniel: You think you could break a log like that?

- Mr. Miyagi: Don't know. Never been attacked by a tree before

 

 😛

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On 1/20/2021, 10:12:21, optimista said:

Why do men have to measure everything? Does it stem from having to know how they compare to other men's stems?

@RF: maybe you have just reached the peak of your potential and there is nowhere to go from where you are now? :ph34r:

 

It is extremely important. When you know your FTP, you can train accordingly.

 

At the moment I am training in my Vo2max zone (maximum rate of oxygen consumption), if I didn`t measure my FTP I would not know what my Vo2 Max zone was.

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On 19/01/2021, 20:36:37, RenegadeFurther said:

but the lactic acid build up is what is making me stop or go slower.

You need to train your lactic acid threshold. See here: "Anaerobic Threshold (AT) is often expressed as a percentage of VO2 max (50% - 60% for the general population, 75% and above for athletes). The higher the AT, the higher intensity the athlete can sustain without producing lactic acid. Therefore, AT is a better predictor of performance than VO2 max in elite athletes." http://ijhsnet.com/vol-3-no-1-march-2015-abstract-14-ijhs14

 

So you need to re-evaluate your trainingsplan wrt to your target trainings heart rate.

 

Also pay attention to your heart rate during warm up, and how long you need to warm up for till you get your lactic acid system in gear so that input=output, since it also affects your aerobic-anaerobic tipping point (vital if you want to stay just under or delay the aerobic-anaerobic switch).

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/259605164_Effect_of_Warm-Up_on_Intermittent_Sprint_Performance Can be surprisingly long, not the 5-10 mins usually done as a warm up, but rather takes 20-30 mins  for input/output to balance.

 

And consider your breathing pattern. If you swim, and you are racing a longer distance, and you breathe too seldom, you flip over to anaerobic and lactic acid builds up and you just hit a wall of syrup before the end of your race. Perhaps you are not breathing enough when you concentrate on producing power.

 

Also fuel: you want increase your glycogen storage capacity, so you need to replenish with carbs directly after training. Determine how many g carbohydrate you need to take in per kg body weight. Hydration (too sweet drinks during training lead to dehydration, dehydration is a performance killer). Do you keep a trainings diary? Food, carbs, water, heart rate, sleep, alcohol (will kill your performance), sleep quality. Calculate your daily intake of magnesium (usually too low), calcium (usually high enough), potassium levels (usually too low). https://www.peakendurancesport.com/nutrition-for-endurance-athletes/supplements/using-magnesium-improve-exercise-performance/ Magnesium needs to be bioavailable, so magnesium citrate is best, magnesium carbonate not good.

 

And you need rest days, else you will end up overtraining. The older you are, the more rest days you need in-between. Could you be in an "overtraining" slump now?

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On 1/26/2021, 11:23:06, ZA1234 said:

You need to train your lactic acid threshold. See here: "Anaerobic Threshold (AT) is often expressed as a percentage of VO2 max (50% - 60% for the general population, 75% and above for athletes). The higher the AT, the higher intensity the athlete can sustain without producing lactic acid. Therefore, AT is a better predictor of performance than VO2 max in elite athletes." http://ijhsnet.com/vol-3-no-1-march-2015-abstract-14-ijhs14

 

So you need to re-evaluate your trainingsplan wrt to your target trainings heart rate.

 

Also pay attention to your heart rate during warm up, and how long you need to warm up for till you get your lactic acid system in gear so that input=output, since it also affects your aerobic-anaerobic tipping point (vital if you want to stay just under or delay the aerobic-anaerobic switch).

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/259605164_Effect_of_Warm-Up_on_Intermittent_Sprint_Performance Can be surprisingly long, not the 5-10 mins usually done as a warm up, but rather takes 20-30 mins  for input/output to balance.

 

And consider your breathing pattern. If you swim, and you are racing a longer distance, and you breathe too seldom, you flip over to anaerobic and lactic acid builds up and you just hit a wall of syrup before the end of your race. Perhaps you are not breathing enough when you concentrate on producing power.

 

Also fuel: you want increase your glycogen storage capacity, so you need to replenish with carbs directly after training. Determine how many g carbohydrate you need to take in per kg body weight. Hydration (too sweet drinks during training lead to dehydration, dehydration is a performance killer). Do you keep a trainings diary? Food, carbs, water, heart rate, sleep, alcohol (will kill your performance), sleep quality. Calculate your daily intake of magnesium (usually too low), calcium (usually high enough), potassium levels (usually too low). https://www.peakendurancesport.com/nutrition-for-endurance-athletes/supplements/using-magnesium-improve-exercise-performance/ Magnesium needs to be bioavailable, so magnesium citrate is best, magnesium carbonate not good.

 

And you need rest days, else you will end up overtraining. The older you are, the more rest days you need in-between. Could you be in an "overtraining" slump now?

 

Thanks for your detailed reply. 

 

So, I am training in my lactic acid threshold, and my heart beat is okay about 155bpm and the lactic acid threshold in the legs is not bothering me, but for some strange reason I just stop.

 

Does anyone know how to stop your mind playing tricks on you when you reach the pain areas?  Rather than stop I would like to continue but my mind won`t let me.

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On 1/20/2021, 10:12:21, optimista said:

Why do men have to measure everything? Does it stem from having to know how they compare to other men's stems?

@RF: maybe you have just reached the peak of your potential and there is nowhere to go from where you are now? :ph34r:

 

Very interesting.

I used to be obsessed about measuring like everybody else. And I claimed it was very helpful to fine tune the best suited training. 

With time I changed opinion. Maybe it helped that a friend, a guy who ran an Olympic final, trains without even wearing a watch. Of course no GPS or HRM either.

After I stopped measuring running pace, marathon and 10km times dropped from 2:49 and 34:49 to 2:37 and 32:46.

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4 hours ago, Gambatte said:

I used to be obsessed about measuring like everybody else.

I´m measuring calories because I hate exercising and don´t want to cycle on my hometrainer for one more second longer than necessary to meet my goal of burning 500 kcal/day on it.

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Yesterday evening, I had a pizza Diavola and 2 glasses of full-bodied red wine, so how many calories is that? I don't count and measure anything 👯.

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On 04/02/2021, 11:26:50, RenegadeFurther said:

 

Thanks for your detailed reply. 

 

So, I am training in my lactic acid threshold, and my heart beat is okay about 155bpm and the lactic acid threshold in the legs is not bothering me, but for some strange reason I just stop.

 

Does anyone know how to stop your mind playing tricks on you when you reach the pain areas?  Rather than stop I would like to continue but my mind won`t let me.

 

You have not mentioned what your workout routine includes.    Is it possible to change or rotate the exercises you do?   That might make things more interesting. 

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On 2/5/2021, 12:58:45, balticus said:

 

You have not mentioned what your workout routine includes.    Is it possible to change or rotate the exercises you do?   That might make things more interesting. 

 

Sorry I must have missed this. I use an indoor cycling machine and connect my heart rate to the monitor.

 

Too cold to go running at the moment.

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3 hours ago, RenegadeFurther said:

 

Sorry I must have missed this. I use an indoor cycling machine and connect my heart rate to the monitor.

 

Too cold to go running at the moment.

 

With gyms closed, i have been able to get decent workouts in with a jump rope and can recommend it to anyone looking to add some variety to their routine.   You can get a very good workout in with less than 30 minutes of activity depending on your rest intervals.    The equipment will cost 12 euros if you get a decent rope.

 

In addition to strengthening legs, hips, and back, it provides a decent shoulder workout and cardio.    The mobility training and hand/eye coordination make it interesting.   I do "sprints" with my oldest son, i.e. jumping while running in place as fast as possible for 45 seconds.   It is a lot like interval training on a track.   

 

I am taking a break while there is snow on the ground, but where possible i jump a surface like a running track, outdoor gym or playground which has a softer, non-asphalt surface.

 

Good luck. 

 

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7 hours ago, RenegadeFurther said:

 

Sorry I must have missed this. I use an indoor cycling machine and connect my heart rate to the monitor.

 

Too cold to go running at the moment.

Nooooooooooo. It is never too cold for running. I've been running since 1988 and never missed a day of running because of the weather.

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