A gift to a doctor

41 posts in this topic

Hello, I'm going to have important medical operation in few days and I was wondering if it is common in here to give something to the doctor for appreciation. I was wondering about box of chocolates, a bottle of alcohol and some item.

Is this common in Germany or is it considered a bribe and even against the law? Maybe it's even suitable to give money as a gift?

 

Waiting for your feedback, thanks!

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Money is certainly not appropriate!

 

If you stay in hospital for a few days then you MIGHT consider giving a gift to the whole staff looking after you at the end of your treatment, which could be something which they can share like chocolates.  That is better because; 

1)  You then avoid issues such as favouritism from a specific person/doctor

2)  It is likely that you will be seen by many doctors anyway

3)  It is the whole staff, and especially the nurses, who look after you.  And they will share it with the doctors etc.

 

But it depends on the circumstances and is certainly not expected.

For example when my daughter was born we done that for both the staff in the delivery area and the staff on the ward.  But when she was rushed in as an emergency then actually we didn't do that (just 1 night in hospital).

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I have wondered if it's socially acceptable to give gifts to doctors but never considered it might be illegal! Good point

 

I'd steer far away from a cash gift in any case as that has various opportunities to be misconstrued.

 

ETA: agree very much with dj that something the whole staff can enjoy is most appropriate. I regifted flowers I got in the hospital to liven up my nurses' breakroom and they loved it.

 

If not food, flowers or a pretty plant for the office would be a nice gesture.

 

 

 

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A friend of mine is a psychiatrist and he has been named sole heir by 3 of his patients. Wouldn´t suggest this for a surgeon though - it might be the wrong incentive.

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45 minutes ago, lisa13 said:

If not food, flowers or a pretty plant for the office would be a nice gesture.

 

 

 

Just want to mention that my local hospital does not allow any plants to be taken in, in case there are creepy-crawlies in the soil.

It might be best to ask the staff about this, and also what sort of "thankyou" they would like - these days, sometimes simply writing a letter of thanks is more meaningful, since so few people actually put pen to paper now!

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8 minutes ago, jeba said:

A friend of mine is a psychiatrist and he has been named sole heir by 3 of his patients. Wouldn´t suggest this for a surgeon though - it might be the wrong incentive.

 

But you live in Greece!

 

Where "cash contributions towards the well-being of a doctor" are required for every medical appointment!

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Just now, lisa13 said:

Even flowers?!

 

 

 

I said plants!

- because of the soil...

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44 minutes ago, robinson100 said:

 

Just want to mention that my local hospital does not allow any plants to be taken in, in case there are creepy-crawlies in the soil.

 

It's not due to creepy crawlies but primarily due to the risk of infection that hospitals ban flowers and plants for patients.

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Why not check if the hospital has a charity program and donate to that? I don't know, which hospital you are having the operation in (good luck by the way) but the Charité has their own charity programs that people can donate to and presumably other hospitals have the same thing - https://gewaltschutzambulanz.charite.de/angebot_der_gewaltschutzambulanz/spenden/

 

This avoids any problems with allergies, what is/isn't allowed, etc. and you can always send a card directly to the Ward where you were staying thanking the Doctors/Nurses for looking after you once you are out of hospital.

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41 minutes ago, warsteiner70 said:

[..] has their own charity programs that people can donate to and presumably other hospitals have the same thing -

@Itsmeeh, throw "elternhaus krankenhaus" into google to find out what a "Elternhaus" close to a "Krankenhaus" is...

 

These places are always in need of donations...

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7 hours ago, dj_jay_smith said:

 

But you live in Greece!

 

Where "cash contributions towards the well-being of a doctor" are required for every medical appointment!

No, I live in Cyprus. And there is no such requirement here.

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@lisa13 - the ward for newborns (intensive care and regular) in Heidelberg prohibits all flowers - potted or cut.  They are mostly put in the hallway that leads to the ward because people cannot take them in. This extended to the nurses' break room.  

 

I dropped off a card with some money for the entire department a few weeks after we went home because I knew the staff collect the money and buy breakfast for everyone,  or dinner when they have collected enough.  

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9 hours ago, jeba said:

A friend of mine is a psychiatrist and he has been named sole heir by 3 of his patients.

Does he use hypnotism? This sounds extremely dubious.

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1 hour ago, optimista said:

Does he use hypnotism? This sounds extremely dubious.

No, they were all elderly and lonesome women who seem to have felt he was the only person caring about them. He does have that empathic vibe.

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So your friend didn´t talk to them about their wills? I  must admit it sounds dubious to me as well....

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He's a psychiatrist. I can see that happening. People who feel as though he is the only person who understands them, that he has brought them out of darkness etc. And he quite possibly is that person, which is OK. I am a bit surprised that it is legal, but hey ho.

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 I thought that it was standard in health care to not become beneficiary of patients because this always would be considered dubious? Like not getting into a personal relationship and all?

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