Salary per month for family

60 posts in this topic

Clearly, you don't live in Munich. €1200 for 95-100 sqm?? €1800 warm is more realistic and then you still need a lot of luck. 

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I think this document answers your question(s):

 

https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/sites/homeaffairs/files/11a_germany_family_reunification_en_final.pdf

 

I understand you would need: Rent ("cold rent") + insurance for your family + 2*364 + 2*237 = 1202 euros (from Table 3; page 34). 

 

Clearly this is not possible with the income you have been offered. The document also outlines the minimum requirements for space, for which you don't have to count your youngest child if <2yo, so quite a small apartment would suffice to meet the requirements, but as stated would be very uncomfortable. I think your family member needs to double the offer to get you in the vicinity of where you need to be in terms of income, or at least add 50%.   

 

Just out of curiosity, what is the main motivator to even start considering such a move?

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Isn't it also the case that for visas the authorities take into account the living costs is each city/region individually.  So that somebody wanting a visa to live and work in Munich would have to earn significantly more than somebody wanting the same job in another city/region of Germany before the authorities would deem it as an acceptable wage and grant a visa.

 

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35 minutes ago, dj_jay_smith said:

 

Isn't it also the case that for visas the authorities take into account the living costs is each city/region individually.  So that somebody wanting a visa to live and work in Munich would have to earn significantly more than somebody wanting the same job in another city/region of Germany before the authorities would deem it as an acceptable wage and grant a visa.

 

Effectively yes.  Getting the residency visa requires, among other things, having a place to live (for example, a rental contract)  and demonstrating that you can pay for it in the future (via a job or retirement income or ...).  So obviously the cost of living in each area comes into play as you apply with the local authorities.  Here in Konstanz we were warned by them about a very tight rental housing market and high prices.  But obviously Munich is yet another world.  

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10 hours ago, slammer said:

Also don‘t forget that As an American thanks to FATCA you are toxic to most banks. 

That's interesting to hear. Since you know so much about this, maybe you can explain why I have never had any problem whatsoever opening bank accounts here in Germany? 

 

Oh wait, I know why! it's because that is a bullshit statement. 

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18 hours ago, eemk said:

I might have a potential job offer from a family member and they are offering to pay 2,000euro/month GROSS. 

 

With that being said, I have read that for a family of four you would have to receive NETTO 1,900-2,200 to get a family reunification visa granted. Is this true? I would really like a link that is official that has some sort of information on this and or some table that shows these figures.

Your problem is not the reunification visa for your wife and kids after you've been working in Germany for a while.

 

Your problem is your work visa to start!

 

The fact that a pal who already lives here is willing to give you a job isn't enough to get a work visa in Germany. Your potential employer has to prove that nobody in Europe is available to do the job. This will be thoroughly checked by the authorities. They won't let you and your pal jump that queue of applicants!

 

And 2000€/month gross doesn't really sound like you having a rare/sought after qualification, sorry.

 

If you cannot get passed that German thing called "Vorrangprüfung" all your plans are void!

 

The very next problem: Is your qualification approved by German law? Example: Having worked as Electrician in the US doesn't necessarily mean that you are allowed to work as Electrician in Germany.

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1 hour ago, lisa13 said:

That's interesting to hear. Since you know so much about this, maybe you can explain why I have never had any problem whatsoever opening bank accounts here in Germany? 

 

Oh wait, I know why! it's because that is a bullshit statement. 

Not bullshit, but perhaps exaggerated.  

https://americansoverseas.org/de/frankfurter-allgemeine-kein-depot-mehr-kunden-mit-amerika-bezug/

I am only aware that Commerzbank has taken this step.

 

Also Switzerland

https://www.zeit.de/2009/26/F-Schweizer-Banken

 

I was told I cannot invest in mutual funds at my bank.  

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It is funny that the OP has already signed off but you all keep going at it.  I think he got the message already.

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4 minutes ago, BradinBayern said:

Not bullshit, but perhaps exaggerated.  

https://americansoverseas.org/de/frankfurter-allgemeine-kein-depot-mehr-kunden-mit-amerika-bezug/

I am only aware that Commerzbank has taken this step.

 

Also Switzerland

https://www.zeit.de/2009/26/F-Schweizer-Banken

 

I was told I cannot invest in mutual funds at my bank.  

 

yeah, but a depot is an investment account, not a bank account.

 

no bank will give americans a depotkonto, but that's not really a concern for OP with that salary, is it?

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7 minutes ago, lisa13 said:

 

yeah, but a depot is an investment account, not a bank account.

 

no bank will give americans a depotkonto, but that's not really a concern for OP with that salary, is it?

I was turned down by an online bank for being an American.  I don't remember which one though. 

 

You are right however, concern about not getting a bank account should not be a reason to not come to Germany.  Still FATCA is annoying as hell... 

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oh yes it most definitely is.  I vaguely recall that there was an effort by banks to deny americans savings and/or girokontos but it was eventually stamped out with existing anti-discrimination laws.  

 

don't quote me on that though :)

 

anyway I have had no problems with dkb and ing diba, and my "starter" account was with hypovereinsbank (hisssssssssssssss).  if you get turned down for a regular bank account you might have a case to force them to take you anyway, but there are plenty of other banks so, whatever.

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12 hours ago, lisa13 said:

That's interesting to hear. Since you know so much about this, maybe you can explain why I have never had any problem whatsoever opening bank accounts here in Germany? 

 

Oh wait, I know why! it's because that is a bullshit statement. 

We have had this dance methinks, Now don‘t get me wrong, I am happy for you and the fact that double taxation has no hold on your Lohnsteuerkarte, but for most FATCA is a monstrosity.

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The first account we opened here, as US citizens, was an N26 account.  No FATCA stuff required there.  So that's a way for someone to get started.

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20 minutes ago, slammer said:

We have had this dance methinks, Now don‘t get me wrong, I am happy for you and the fact that double taxation has no hold on your Lohnsteuerkarte, but for most FATCA is a monstrosity.

There is no restriction against Americans when opening normal bank accounts. That's it.

 

You can try to make it about your lack of knowledge in our previous tax discussion, if you like :)

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Folks,

 

There are two items to consider if you are a US citizen and live outside the US and/or have a bank account outside of the US:  FATCA and FBAR.

 

FATCA (Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act) is handled by both the bank/financial institution and the taxpayer.  Not everyone who live overseas has to file Form 8938.  Here's the reporting thresholds from the IRS website:

 

Taxpayers living abroad. You must file a Form 8938 if you must file an income tax return and:

  • You are married filing a joint income tax return and the total value of your specified foreign financial assets is more than $400,000 on the last day of the tax year or more than $600,000 at any time during the year. These thresholds apply even if only one spouse resides abroad. Married individuals who file a joint income tax return for the tax year will file a single Form 8938 that reports all of the specified foreign financial assets in which either spouse has an interest. 
  • You are not a married person filing a joint income tax return and the total value of your specified foreign financial assets is more than $200,000 on the last day of the tax year or more than $300,000 at any time during the year.

 

FBAR (Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts) - You have to file this with FINCEN/Treasury Department if you meet these filing requirements:  

 

A United States person that has a financial interest in or signature authority over foreign financial accounts must file an FBAR if the aggregate value of the foreign financial accounts exceeds $10,000 at any time during the calendar year. 

 

S.

 

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yeah but that doesn't have anything to do with why and how fatca really and tangibly hurts Americans in germany, which boils down to the reporting requirements for financial institutions. They can't legally bar us from having bank accounts, but we can't invest unless we're filthy rich because no institution wants to deal with the reporting for average people. It also has nothing to do with slammers persistent thought that double taxation is actually and effectively a thing for German residents provided you file your us return properly. This is way off topic.

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On 1/14/2020, 11:49:59, LukeSkywalker said:

Clearly, you don't live in Munich. €1200 for 95-100 sqm?? €1800 warm is more realistic and then you still need a lot of luck. 


Thats the cheapest cold I got outside Munich. No need to get your panties in a twist over the euros.

 

 

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You would be just about ok if you went alone.  You could get a small place for 700-1000EUR, but bear in mind you would then need to factor in all the other expenses - food and drink, transport, entertainment, etc.  this can easily run up another 1000 EUR per month, as Munich is an expensive city.  

 

If you have a family, 2000 is not going to go far at all.  You will struggle.  Also, consider that in a year your oldest will have to go school, which causes additional expenses.

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On 15.1.2020, 22:31:04, lisa13 said:

yeah but that doesn't have anything to do with why and how fatca really and tangibly hurts Americans in germany, which boils down to the reporting requirements for financial institutions. They can't legally bar us from having bank accounts, but we can't invest unless we're filthy rich because no institution wants to deal with the reporting for average people. It also has nothing to do with slammers persistent thought that double taxation is actually and effectively a thing for German residents provided you file your us return properly. This is way off topic.

Ahhh! Now I know where the rabbit in the pepper lays, you mis-read my original post to this topic.

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